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The Voice Actor Feedback Forum

Script Genres > English Adult > Narration > Medical & Pharmaceutical

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    A Stitch in Time

    Script:

    A topical medical-grade cyanoacrylate adhesive is indicated as an alternative or adjunct to sutures. Contraindications include the ocular region, and oozing or possibly contaminated wounds.

    66 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Bernrobbo50's recording

    I would like comments about my mic, echo level, etc. Thank you.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Edge270514.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I will copy a comment that I posted to another Forum poster about submitting a recording of the current and active weekly Script Contest.
    _______________________

    Since the Script Contest is meant as a "contest", people have been cautioned about not submitting their recording to the Forum until after the close of the deadline for Contest submissions. I'm not saying that this is the case, but getting feedback gives you an unfair advantage (or disadvantage) over the other contestants. The Contest is meant to simulate an actual audition experience, and in such an environment an auditioner (for a singles spot, at least) wound hardly ever get to hear other auditioners or get feedback from them.

    If you so choose, there is a way to delete this recording so you can resubmit it after midnight EST this Wednesday.

    Click on your name (in blue) - that will take you to "LisaRolanda's Feedback Forum Participation" page.

    Click on "Recordings" (in blue) and you will see a list of your recordings.

    click "delete" (in black). And confirm.
    _______________________________

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    A Stitch in Time

    Script:

    A topical medical-grade cyanoacrylate adhesive is indicated as an alternative or adjunct to sutures. Contraindications include the ocular region, and oozing or possibly contaminated wounds.

    54 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Eagleye's recording

    I use an MXL 2006 Large Diaphragm Condenser Cardioid Mic (used) for recordings with a Xenyx 302 usb preamp, and Reaper for my DAW, editing with Audacity. Also, I will contact the Webmaster because this was posted yesterday for the current Script Contest, but for some reason did not show up on the contestant list?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-88386/script-recording-71207.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi! For the Script Contest, there's a box you check off about listing your entry. It's easy to miss. It's in the area where you upload your entry. As far as I know, you're entered and can win even when the recording is not on the site list. Don't worry.

    Very good recording quality.
    Your voice has a rich, resonant quality.
    This is a tough type of narration. You have the authoritative, knowledgable tone.
    Your pacing and inflection could be even smoother and better to bring the copy
    alive for the listener. Listen for the pause before the word 'wounds' at the end.
    That pause, and some others, take away from the pacing and rhythm that is
    building. Imagine who you're explaining this to, start explaining it in your own words
    and go on to the copy. Transitioning that way works.

    Good luck in the contest!
    Mary

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    59 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear LisaRolanda's recording

    This is my sample submitted for the weekly contest. I have never taken a class and I don't have a real home studio set-up. I did sign up for the entry level class (June), however, I wanted some practice! This is my very first recording so I'm looking for feedback. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-88986/script-recording-71089.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Lisa,

    Welcome to Edge, you will learn a whole lot here! I just wanted to tell you, that you cannot submit a current contest recording. It would be fine if you submitted it after the contest is over. Just a friendly heads up for you.

    You have a nice mature voice that is deep, my voice tends to be on the deeper side too. I am not skilled with medical copy, so I don't have much of a critique to give you. I know that you said that you don't have a home studio set up yet, but can you edit your breaths out? Also, don't leave such a long pause after your "Slate"/your name
    In my own opinion, I would add a little more life to this reading, not sure though.

    Hope this helps, wishing you the best of luck with your Voice Over training, Edge is a great place to take classes and meet new VO friends!!

    Many Blessings,
    Carol

    Peer Feedback:

    Since the Script Contest is meant as a "contest", people have been cautioned about not submitting their recording to the Forum until after the close of the deadline for Contest submissions. I'm not saying that this is the case, but getting feedback gives you an unfair advantage (or disadvantage) over the other contestants. The Contest is meant to simulate an actual audition experience, and in such an environment an auditioner (for a singles spot, at least) wound hardly ever get to hear other auditioners or get feedback from them.

    If you so choose, there is a way to delete this recording so you can resubmit it after midnight EST this Wednesday.

    Click on your name (in blue) - that will take you to "LisaRolanda's Feedback Forum Participation" page.

    Click on "Recordings" (in blue) and you will see a list of your recordings.

    click "delete" (in black). And confirm.

    If you choose not to do so, then here's my 2c:

    I agree with Carol - Pleasant, mature sounding voice, very articulate. Too long a pause after the slate.

    The downside is - it sounds like your reading. Even though medical jargon still has to have that (say it with me now) "conversational" feel. Sure, it's dry copy and loaded with technical stuff and hard to pronounce names, but it needs to sound like it's not hard to say (like this is how you talk every day with your friends).

    Dive in and get into some classes. Don't be afraid to make mistakes and fall down. For many of us (me included) it's the best way to learn.

    Peer Feedback:

    You seem pretty excited about something that most people would not find very exciting. So that is good. I'm sure the client for this audition understands that a dry boring read can put people to sleep. I'd keep your momentum in the remainder of the reading since it sounds like you still had a lot left to read.

    You need to reduce background noise dramatically before this is finalized. You can hear all your subtle movements (maybe adjusting your chair or microphone sound in the beginning) in the background and there is a constant hissing that makes it difficult to focus on your voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks everyone for the comments! I appreciate it! As stated I'm new to this and have never posted before so I don't know all the rules! But rest assured I will not be changing/re-submitting my script. The judges will see the same mistakes you have and will judge accordingly! That being said, I clearly know not to submit a script before judging!! Thanks for that very important tip!

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you did very well in pronouncing all of those medical names and terms. To me, it sounded like you were just relaxing and getting into the flow of this very short script when the time came to wrap it up and move on. I'd love to hear you post a recording of something a little longer; maybe 30, 45 or even 60 seconds.

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    Acetylcholine release

    Script:

    The heavy chain disassociates from the lite chain. The lite chain escapes from the endosome into the citocell. The lite chain of ziomen, is a zinc endoprotease that specifically cleaves Snap25, one of the 3 proteins of the snare fusion complex responsible for the acetylcholine release.

    60 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear TedVoInSpain's recording

    Hi all, the specs on this were - Light but serious, audience will be specialists (leaning about a new product) (in this case, it's dermatologists) NOT all "In your chest, dark, Mr. Know it All" or anything approaching announcery. My agent stressed "Pronounce everything correctly..." ya, like he needs to tell me that? I'm old skool, I called a dermatologist here locally and had the answers in 20 mins. Also, it sounds choppy, but it has to go with a video and needed exact timing for the words and graphics to match. Not my call ;) I chose my preamp settings for a clean transparent sound. Audio chain CAD E100S-Preamp; Warm Audio TB12- (warm audio) WA76 discreet compressor- interface MOTU Microbook II. Feel free to comment or ask questions. Tomorrow, I'll post something from the other end of the spectrum- this was a "Clean" sound- I have another that is a more "Vintage" sound which is more tuneful and has some guts in it but for a completely different kind of read.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8990/script-recording-73385.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The pacing was good and the diction clear. The only word I had trouble with was the first one "heavy" I had to listen a couple of times and if it were not for the script I might not have known. It sounded a bit like heady. Not an easy piece to do. good for you.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the comment, I agree, a tricky one indeed. It took a lot of front load time to check the pronunciations and how they would fit in the final. Thanks for taking the time to listen. (I had to leave out the first part and anything that could identify the customer) Appreciate the feedback!
    If you are old like me, you might realize that this is an ad for a botulism toxin, also known as Botox :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Ted,

    Had to ask TxTom if this is the Ted that he, Richurd and Javier are buddies with. And, indeed, you are.

    I think I commented on a read that you did some time ago with instructions on how to delete it so you could resubmit. (I went back through some of your previous posts and found a reference.)

    So, as a working pro, I'll get real nit-picky and down in the weeds. This seems to be your bread and butter, so these are only visceral impressions. Nuance.

    You followed the specs. The read is up and light, not at all dark and know-it-all-ish.The delivery is just a tad brisk (and I understand the need for the choppiness to sync with video), which causes some of the words to be clipped at the ends - not fully and roundly formed. (Example: "specifically cleaves Snap25" felt a little rushed. And a slight glottal separation between "complex" and "responsible" might sound clearer.)

    A certain "groundedness" with respect to the subject matter might possibly be layered in as well. Up, yet confidently matter-of-fact, but not flat. does that even make sense?

    This is tough stuff. Not only the jargon but delivering it in the style required by the specs.

    A question that I have is the targeted audience as well. Being in Spain, would it be a mixture of languages of non-native English speaking people? That may account for your agent's request (reminder) to be so accurate with your pronunciation. It may also be an aspect of the pace (again, I understand the video sync) so that those non- native English speakers could easily absorb that material.

    Enjoyed it. Would enjoy chatting sometime.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ya, it's me! And I've talked to tom several times about you as well. Listen tedvoinspain on skype, lets hook up here soon.

    I can fill you in a little more on the tech side of what I did, and I appreciate you looking at it from that angle. It's hard to review a clip in less than 2 pages sometime, your commentary is always welcome. I'll show you what I got as a reference- it does have music under- I can't even get AT the final version because you have to be a doctor to get into the place where the videos are!

    With regard to the audience, and this is a really cool thing, there are a lot of Spanish Biotech firms here- it's a cosmetic procedure so commercial application, and the type of "Botox" they manufacture has some special properties etc... So mostly European doctors, but also easily translatable to the us market. Biotech is so global today- Big Pharma- I just wish the vocab fit together a little better ;) Thanks for taking the time to have a look.

    Oh and something else. This was a very sterile clean setting on the preamp. (Warm Audio TB12) I've got something that has a lot more character- more toward the "Vintage" settings on the pre. It is truly a beast)

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Ted. There were a couple of spots where I FELT an edit might have taken place. It's based on the pace breaking slightly before picking back up to what it was prior.

    I'm not going to google the pronunciations on those medical terms...I'm going to assume you got them correct. ;-)

    Peer Feedback:

    I forget that the experts here know more than most and can hear everything! I will sure cop to a couple of kind of tight edits. Because if I could just throw that down, I'd be a DOCTOR and wouldn't have time for VO! Thanks Tom! :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Lovely, very clear, good pace - nice conversational style.

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    Allergies

    Script:

    Do you know what these items have in common? They can kill people who are severly allergic to them. Things as simple as peanuts, milk, eggs and shellfish can cause a severe allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. As many as 1 out of 7 people may at risk for anaphylaxis. Other causes include insect stings, antibiotics, and latex. Are you, or someone you love at risk? Be prepared. Completely avoiding an allergen is impossible. There are treatments that reverse the symptoms of a severe allergic reaction. If you or someone in your family has had any of these symptoms after contact with items like these, talk to your doctor.

    60 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MHeyden's recording

    Always trying to determine what my voice might be best suited for. Any comments appreciated. Thanks! Marianne

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10833/script-recording-52542.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like the seriousness in your tone without alarming the listener. Sounds like you smiled slightly in a couple spots, though, which may not be quite appropriate. Also, the inflection/pitch between "Completely avoiding..." and "There are treatments..." sounded too similar for this bad news/good news pairing. Clear, natural inflection, and terrific pacing. I think your voice sounds great with this type of script.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks so much for the insightful critique Bill. Great point about the good news/bad news snafu. I always love it when I can learn something and apply it to future reads! Appreciate it! Marianne

    Peer Feedback:

    I completely agree with Bill about your ability to convey something serious without making it scary. You say "they can kill people" without either making light of it or beating the listener over the head with how frightening it is. Nice work. I did notice you dropped off in pitch and energy at the end of your sentences a few times (on "anaphylaxis," "reaction," etc.). That might be something to watch for in future reads.

    Peer Feedback:

    Sarah - great observation. Thanks so much for taking the time to give feedback. I will watch for this - I agree that I do tend to drop off in pitch. I have some habits I need to gest past! Thanks. Marianne

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice job, Marianne. The emotional weight and tone was spot on.

    One thing... and this is little, but it can make the difference if you're trying to land the gig...you dropped the word "the" in the phrase"...reverse the symptoms..." (6th line from the top). Also... I noticed an audio "pop" at the word "milk." I listened twice just to make sure it wasn't on my end.

    Tiny things, but they can add up in this competitive business. Otherwise, very very well done.

    Mike F.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks so much, Mike. You're right - these are the things that differentiate one's read as being amateur or professional. Very much appreciate your insight! Marianne

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    72 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear DebInCT's recording

    I just bought a Harlan Hogan Porta Booth Plus. Since the sound is quite different from what I was used to, I'd like some feedback, from those who know more about this than I do, on the recording quality to find out if I'm using it properly The rest of my equipment remains the same, AT 2035 mic, Scarlett Focusrite 2i2, Audacity. I have edited out breath sounds but that's all. Many thanks everyone!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-67786/script-recording-82942.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Although many people swear by them, the Porta Booth things are only so effective. In a deader space it might have served you better, but there is still quite a bit of room reflection in the recording. What is behind you? Is it open space? That is probably where the reflection is coming from.

    I have the same mic and interface in a booth of my own construction which is pretty dead - the noise floor is -61.3dB with my circulating fans on.

    Peer Feedback:

    As James said, the Porta-Booth type of accessory only works if the room you're in is quiet. The device only addresses a reduction of room influences if you address the mic right in front and don't stand back and allow the room to enter the mic via reflections. So you have to read right into the porta-device. I built one for my early recordings and it only worked if cars weren't driving by, planes weren't flying overhead, etc. The room/space has to be pretty quiet. And then you have to avoid introducing the room again by being too far away from the mic and letting the room reflect into the "sweet spot" in front of the porta-booth/mud guard type of device.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you gentlemen. I knew I could count on you both for some helpful advice! I really appreciate it. Wow - these porta booths aren’t as easy as they make them out to be, are they. It sounds like I need to reconfigure my space. To answer your question James, there is open space behind me. Would rehanging some moving blankets behind me help with that? Otherwise, the room itself is rather quiet being in the back of my house. Thanks again.

    Peer Feedback:

    The short answer to that is yes, it would help to drape or tent yourself with moving blankets and/or comforters to deaden the area behind you. Realize that sound is omni-directional, meaning that, even though you are directing your voice toward the mic, the sound waves are being scattered like the ripples in a pond after throwing in a pebble - they radiate out from the central point in all directions. In this case in 3D - front and back, sides to side, up and down. So your voice is in all actuality going around and behind you as well as bouncing off the floor and ceiling.

    Before I built my booth, I had one of those mud flap contraptions and did my recording in a closet. I padded the interior of the closet with sound absorbing/deadening material and pointed the mic into the closet so the mud flap was essentially in the doorway with it's back to the open room. It was marginally effective, but better than the other way around with the sound from the open room bouncing back in from behind me. The PITA (pain in the - y'know) was ducking under the mud flap contraption to crawl into the closet to get into position to record.

    Peer Feedback:

    Great, thanks very much James! I'll do that with the moving blankets and re-record this same script. Keeping my fingers crossed...

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    Atrial Fibrilation

    Script:

    The heart is a remarkable organ. It is a muscle that relaxes and contracts, pumping blood, carrying oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The steady rhythm of these contractions is controlled by electrical impulses that travel through the heart, first through the upper chambers, call the atria; and then through the lower chambers, called the ventricles. In order to reach the ventricles, electrical impulses must pass here, at the atrioventricular node. Atrial fibrillation occurs when a storm of electrical impulses spread through the atria in a chaotic and disorganized pattern, causing the atria to begin rapidly contracting, as a result, the ventricles may also begin contracting faster. When the heart is in atrial fibrillation, the body can't receive the blood and oxygen it needs.

    56 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Sherrill S's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-12306/script-recording-55230.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You know Sherrill?
    I liked it! You were connected to the read throughout -to me that is- and kept me interested AND wanting to hear more!!
    You reminded me of a science DVD I was given when in College! Great pace and voice for this kind of reads for sure!!
    Would love to hear more :)

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    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear erapp1@yahoo.com's recording

    If you spot any regionalisms, in addition to any other areas regarding the performance, I would appreciate it.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-15345/script-recording-48056.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I'll point out the strong regionalisms: called, pass, disorganized, causing, also. I noticed you tend to pause after verbs, such as "controlled" and "occurs" and the modal verb "can't." Never pause after a verb. You'll want to pause elsewhere if you need a breath. Adjust those words and pauses and you're on your way!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi! I liked your voice but IMO, it showed a slight diffidence in your approach. Pacing was varied and it felt like you were reading more to yourself than a confident and informative exercise. Best.

    Peer Feedback:

    You voice is suited to this type of material. You changed your pace during your reading - speeding up in spots and then slowing again in others, and it sounded a bit uneven to me. Also, to me, you started out with a kind of light reading with a young audience in mind and then you switched to a more straightforward approach. Watch multi-syllable words like electrical -- For instance, it sounds like you glided over the first "c" in electrical. I thought the recording quality was fine. Nice job.

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    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Lukky Salas's recording

    I'm trying Medical/Pharma category. Am I clear, smooth? Lukky

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/ATRIAL FIBRILLATION_0.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You might want re-post this or redo it. It is very hard to hear.

    Peer Feedback:

    There are some definite volume issues. Unable to hear this read.

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    Atrial Fibrillation

    Script:

    The heart is a remarkable organ. It is a muscle that relaxes and contracts, pumping blood, carrying oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The steady rhythm of these contractions is controlled by electrical impulses that travel through the heart, first through the upper chambers, call the atria; and then through the lower chambers, called the ventricles. In order to reach the ventricles, electrical impulses must pass here, at the atrioventricular node. Atrial fibrillation occurs when a storm of electrical impulses spread through the atria in a chaotic and disorganized pattern, causing the atria to begin rapidly contracting, as a result, the ventricles may also begin contracting faster. When the heart is in atrial fibrillation, the body can't receive the blood and oxygen it needs.

    36 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear psunderwood's recording

    I've added some room treatment to my recording space: packing blankets and an SE Electronics Reflexion Filter X behind the mic. I'm also trying to tame breath noise by recording more off axis than previously. I'd like to hear how the recording sounds technically and how the performance sounds; I see it as part of a video training film for patients or pre-EMTs or such. The only editing here was trimming the ends off and normalizing to -3 db. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Atrial Fibrillation Take 5 Edited.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi psunderwood,

    My feed back is based on what I can hear.

    I think the room treatment has worked. There were no noticeable echos or reverberations.

    As for the breath noise and other sounds, I could hear the following:

    Mouth sounds
    after 'remarkable organ'...before 'its a muscle...'
    after 'the atria' before '; and then...'
    after 'contracting faster...' and 'When the...' (also breath here)

    Click
    after 'pass here...' before 'at the...'

    Breath..
    after 'pumping blood...' before 'carrying...'
    after 'through the heart...' before ' first through...'
    after 'disorganized pattern...' before 'causing...'
    after 'contracting...' before 'as a result...'

    Though technically not studio quality, the recording should be acceptable "for a video training film for patients or pre-EMTs or such."

    Your performance was good overall except that you sounded a little tired at "When the heart is in atrial fibrillation.."

    All the best!

    Regards
    Jothi

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Jothi. I really appreciate the thoroughness of your analysis, and I'll be scouring the recording looking at the points you raise. Breath control is, I think, my major stumbling block right now, and is probably behind the tired feeling you point out (I think I was out of breath there). I want to play with distance from the microphone, angle towards the microphone, and so on, to get the cleanest recording I can before I start messing with the recording.

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    Atrial Fibrillation

    Script:

    The heart is a remarkable organ. It is a muscle that relaxes and contracts, pumping blood, carrying oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The steady rhythm of these contractions is controlled by electrical impulses that travel through the heart, first through the upper chambers, call the atria; and then through the lower chambers, called the ventricles. In order to reach the ventricles, electrical impulses must pass here, at the atrioventricular node. Atrial fibrillation occurs when a storm of electrical impulses spread through the atria in a chaotic and disorganized pattern, causing the atria to begin rapidly contracting, as a result, the ventricles may also begin contracting faster. When the heart is in atrial fibrillation, the body can't receive the blood and oxygen it needs.

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear rhondaduncan@att.net's recording

    Hi all...I'm trying out a "new" genre and would appreciate any feedback. Thanks, Rhonda

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6779/script-recording-53747.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Rhondauncan@att.net,

    You have a nice voice and very good pronunciation. For me, I felt like this recording sounded a bit stiff overall. Sometimes I even felt like it was a "recorded" voice and not human! I think that if you try to relax a little and give it a little more emotion, it will sound a lot more natural.

    When reading the script, it seemed to me that this might accompany a video or animated drawings of someone's heart. For this reason, when it gets to the line "In order to reach the ventricles, electrical impulses must pass here, at the atrioventricular node," I would think about putting more emphasis on the word "here," as if you were actually pointing to that spot. Because in my mind in a video this would be a moment when that particular area would be highlighted.

    I think that if you try to imagine that you're explaining all this technical stuff to just one person, maybe you're the doctor and that person is in your office and you're showing them what's going on, it might help the overall reading sound more conversational and natural.

    I hope this helps!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks bquesda...it does help! Yes, my thought was the same that this might accompany a video. I like your idea regarding how to put more emphasis on "here." I'm going to try that (very good suggestion). Also, like I said this is a "new" genre for me so I was interpreting this script as a "more informational read." I'm going to submit this for private pro feedback to get a better understanding of how "Medical Narrations" need to be read. Your feedback was very well received.

    Thanks again,

    Rhonda

    Peer Feedback:

    Would love it if you wouldn't mind sharing any insight you learn from a pro feedback!

    Thanks!
    Barbara (Bquesada)

    Peer Feedback:

    Sure Barbara...will do.

    Back to top
    Atrial Fibrillation

    Script:

    The heart is a remarkable organ. It is a muscle that relaxes and contracts, pumping blood carrying oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The steady rhythm of these contraptions is controlled by electrical impulses that travel through the heart, first through the upper chambers, called the atria; and then through the lower chambers, called the ventricles. In order to reach the ventricles, electrical impulses must pass here, at the atrioventricular node. Atrial fibrillation occurs when a storm of electrical impulses spread through the atria in a chaotic and disorganized patter, causing the atria to begin rapidly contracting. As a result, the ventricles may also begin contracting faster. When the heart is in atrial fibrillation, the body can't receive the blood and oxygen it needs.

    33 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear rhondaduncan@att.net's recording

    Hi Barbara (Bequesda)...here's the pro feedback I got from Randye on the medical narration "Atrial Fibrillation." You asked me to share it with you, so here it is. This was VERY HELPFUL to better understand HOW medical narrations work. Professional Feedback: Hi Rhonda - overall, it's really good. Clear, precise, intelligent, articulate. I think this is a good genre for you to explore. Each medical read has its own level of "warmth" required - from almost neutral (e.g. your read here) to more conversational/connected/warm (e.g., patient education) Your pacing is ok - perhaps a bit fast, but as long as you can adjust according to the visual and/or client request, it's good. If this were an audition, perhaps a bit more spacing between idea would make it seems less rushed. The other thing is that your read is SO neutral, it almost seems choppy in places e.g. chaotic/and/disorganized/fashion) - work on smoothness in your phrases; also the client might also want a touch more warmth/connection to the listener (like a "teaching" tone). If on the job, you and the client could decide on the tone. If an audition, I'd go with the specs...or maybe just warm it up a tiny bit. god job! Randye

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6779/script-recording-54121.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I concur. I thought it was a perfectly good read. You'd need the client to tell you whether they wanted it this neutral or more intimate. Sounded great.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you spblat for your feedback...I appreciate you taking the time to give it.
    Rhonda

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    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear erapp1@yahoo.com's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-15345/script-recording-48472.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Love the softness and calming effect our voice gave to me. I now notice the "aull", sound with the word all in other peoples reads. It was pointed out to me in some of my reads. Next time be sure to include the script along with your mp3.

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    39 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    This is intended to be a doctor read: soft, friendly, confidential. Does it sound like that? I know it sounds like someone's grand-father. But, when I was a boy, and the doctor came to the house, he spoke like this. The best of this type is being run now on TV spots for the "Arriva" bloodless glucose meter. He's really convincing! I'd rather have peer feedback than Edge pro feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-26626.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Henry,

    This is a better script for you. The tone was good and you appeared relaxed. I would have used just a tad bit more of emotion and the first line "If you have diabetes" pause, then can continue. Otherwise, it was a good read. Looking forward to your next script. Best of luck.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thenk you. Comments well received. But, "If you have diabetes, it's important ..."
    is one continuous idea. No pause.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with LC. A bit more emotion would have sent this over the top. A pause in the spot she mentioned was also needed. Nice job.

    Peer Feedback:

    Okay, a little more warmth. I would never use that pause in conversation. It's a stopper.
    Your comments are very helpful and important to me. This is an area I could work in.
    I will rework this piece. Thank you for your comments.

    Peer Feedback:

    Just want to add that I am happy with my microphone, the $100 Samson.
    My voice is dead straight, with no further work. Good fit.

    Peer Feedback:

    a thousandfold improvement Henry. I like your voice without all the tremelo. The samson mic is a beauty too. Well done!

    Peer Feedback:

    Really appreciate your comment Nodo. I don't plan to invest in home studio.
    A working VO artist and coach told me to go for the Samson, because she used it. Emotion in a read like this is a problem for me. In talking one to one, I am somewhat reserved. I worked in the construction field, and emotion would get you a punch in the mouth. Honesty is my first concern. Maybe I'll give this a serious shot.
    I was a good character actor. I joined SAG in 1963. But money drew me away.
    The previous piece was a cheeky try, intended to be ethereal and whispery. Bad pick. .

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    Cancer Educational App Narration

    Script:

    You ask what he means by “lesions.” He answers, “Damage to the organs, whether it be from an ulcer, an abscess, or cancer. We will also schedule you for a bone marrow biopsy, which is necessary to help determine the aggressiveness of the cancer, as well as treatment.” The word “cancer” rings in your ears.
    ----
    Your kidneys begin to fail, and the pain in your bones increases every day given the additional bone lesions. Your family does everything they can to make you comfortable, reassuring themselves that you may still pull through. Though you’d never say it out loud, you know that death is inevitable.

    76 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear claudineguild's recording

    I have a new microphone and want to know if this audition sounds good. Please feel absolutely free to criticize the performance as well. I consciously want to improve my audition ability. Here are the script parameters: This narration is for an app that is being developed for the purposes of internal employee education. The company works in the cancer field and would like to give its employees the chance to experience a cancer diagnosis first-hand. The narration will accompany visuals within the app, as it guides the participant through the cancer journey, starting with initial symptoms and ending in death. It is intended to be a somber, thoughtful, and emotional experience. The narration is primarily in second-person, and alternates between describing the inner thoughts of the patient, and the conversations and events happening around them.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-108557/script-recording-98246.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Mic sounded fine to me, your clarity was very good, your pacing was pretty good you could have paused a little longer in some places in my opinion.I wasn't quit sure if your
    inflections and emotions were on point or not.But keep in mind I'm not a pro at critiquing other peoples work.

    Peer Feedback:

    I like the feel. The mic was clear, but could be louder. And I hear a lot of mouth clicks, which I struggle with constantly.

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your voice. I think the copy interpretation is good. The vocal presentation could be just a tad better, for instance when you say the line 'an ulcer, an abscess, or cancer" they all sounded the same in tone. Try a pitch lift on one, maybe abscess to break up the tone, maybe pause on the last one...cancer as that is the worst right? Recording quality - I hear something in the background at first I thought it was with the mic - mechanical/highs? Here are the words around which I hear something "lesions, organs, we, treatment". Good job!

    Back to top
    cenegenics

    Script:

    Age Management Medical System - Cenegenics
    Aging is inevitable, but how you age is not. You have the power to take control and actually manage your aging process. A unique Cenegenics protocol is your gateway to next generation medical science . . . a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to age management that takes you well beyond the conventional approach of quick, routine exams and generalized guesstimates, based on body type, gender and age. In-depth diagnostics reveal your big picture, uncovering your strengths and weakest health links. With that medical data in hand, Cenegenics Affiliate NYC partners with you to create a personalized, multi-faceted program, which meets your health goals and successfully manages your aging process.
    Think of it as "squaring the curve," staying healthy and staving off decline, typically associated with getting older. The result? Youthful aging with a more vigorous, healthier lifestyle. Take charge & revitalize your aging process today ...

    66 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear hunnoe1956's recording

    I have been working on the sing-songy thing you were talking about. I think it's better. Just some general critique would also be helpful as well as some comments about what else may need work before I consider doing a demo. Thank you so much for your help.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-119863/script-recording-93090.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Such a pleasant, voice! The words are very smooth and connected. My only overall comment would be that it sounds like you are holding back your breath, almost as if you wanted to whisper or tell a secret. I can see how that may be appropriate in some cases, but here, I think you would want to convey more confidence and assurance to the listener. Release the breathe naturally, and just sit further away from the mic if you don't want to seem like you're shouting. Hope that's helpful!

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    Cipro Hc Otic

    Script:

    Each mL of CIPRO HC OTIC contains ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (equivalent to 2 mg ciprofloxacin), 10 mg hydrocortisone (equivalent to 2 mg ciprofloxacin), and 9 mL benzyl alcohol as a preservative.

    36 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Lukky Salas's recording

    I'm still trying my new mic so please tell me how the sound is. This is a 24-sec. bit for a Medical text tryout. (I'm not sure it makes sense but I'm reading it as is.) Am I pronouncing clearly? This is a part of the longer text in the script library.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/CIPRO-SHORT.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think that you did a great job, especially with pronouncing the medical terms, your pacing between I thought was good and quality was clear. Good Job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Mike: Thanks for your comments! There were 15 listeners and only one feedback. I was beginning to worry .

    Peer Feedback:

    That script was a toughy. Your pronunciation was crystal clear. There was just a little too much emotion in your reading for such a dry subject. Keep up the good work.
    Mike W.

    Peer Feedback:

    You must be excited to have a new mic! Your recording space is still a little lively, but I think the mic tone is nice and bright.

    I would make this faster, pronounce "HC" as just the letters (it's not just the chemical abbreviation but also the chosen product name, and not a common abbreviation for a unit of volume or mass like the milligrams and milliliters), and my teachers always said "o-tic" with a long "o".

    Nice clarity and voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    Tonia: Thanks for your specific comments. They are very helpful. Yes, a medical friend of mine also pointed out the long 'o' in otic. Is there any difference in pronouncing 'mL' and 'ml'?
    My friend also pointed out the website www.howjsay.com for help pronouncing words, especially medical/chemical terms.
    Lukky

    Peer Feedback:

    Lukky: No, you'd say milliliter for both. I don't know why the script uses mL instead of ml. It's not as though one writes mG. :) I've seen howjsay.com and know some use Merriam-Webster online, too. I worked in biotech for a short spell and have a veterinary degree, so I'll confess that most of the time I'm just using my personal experience on these kinds of reads (which I'll be more careful with when it's for a client!). Your question made me curious about the right written usage, though, and I did find this: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~hillger/correct.htm

    Back to top
    Colon Cancer PSA

    Script:

    Colon cancer is the nation’s second leading cause of cancer death when both sexes are combined. Medical experts recommend screening for all men and women starting at age 50.

    114 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear psjones's recording

    Direction: tone to be serious, but warm and relatable.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-91843/script-recording-80112.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    PSJ,

    Nice voice. To stress the importance of the message, slow down and inflect on key words like cancer, screening, both. In fact , being only 2 sentences you can afford to stretch it out a little.

    Peer Feedback:

    PS
    Slow down and talk to those women who have not had a screening but need to. Compassionately convince them to see a doctor.

    Peer Feedback:

    This is one of those instances where you could actually add commas or pauses for emphasis to drive the message home. How would you have read it if it looked like this:

    COLON CANCER, is the nation’s SECOND LEADING CAUSE of cancer death, when BOTH SEXES, are COMBINED. Medical experts recommend screening, for ALL MEN AND WOMEN, starting at AGE 50.

    Just visually, certain key points are emphasized (not necessarily "punched" or made louder but maybe just somewhat elongated) and the commas don't necessarily mean to take a breath, but just a little glottal pause to embellish the importance of the previous phrase.

    And, as indicated by the previous two comments, if you treat this as a 15 second PSA instead 10 seconds, it gives you the breathing room to give the message some gravitas (the serious tone) because your natural voice is warm and relatable.

    However, consider one thing. You have a "young-ish" sounding voice. This copy is geared toward men and women 50 years of age and above. Would you actually be offered this as an audition? To my sensibilities, I hear someone older (over 50) who possibly has actually had the experience of beating colon cancer through the benefit of early detection by following the advice of this spot. Just my 2c.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks guys, good points. It's kinda funny, after hearing this recording or any for that matter a few times, ya say to yourself, I should have done it this way or that way. But it's always helpful to get different opinions on "which" way would be the most impactful. PSJ

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your voice. It's approachable and down to earth. But I am wondering if perhaps this read is a little to upbeat and cheerful given the subject matter?

    And in response to your last comment-- I am in total agreement, always analyzing my auditions after they have been sent in and hearing how I could have done it better in this or that way. It seems kind of impossible to know what folks are looking for!

    Back to top
    Comorbidities

    Script:

    We are looking for an Asian male talent who is fluent in English with a slight Asian accent. This is medial narration spot:

    Welcome to the Comorbidities section of Diabetes Conditioning Part I. In this activity, you will focus on comorbidities that are common in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    It is important to understand the meaning of comorbidity. A comorbidity is a concomitant but unrelated pathologic or disease process; usually used in epidemiology to indicate the coexistence of two or more disease processes. Notice the word "unrelated" in the definition. What this means is that diabetes is not a cause of the other disease nor is the other disease a cause of diabetes. That is why this section will not include the same information as in Part I - which represented complications of diabetes that occur in different parts of the body.

    Obesity not only increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, it makes management of diabetes more difficult. Obesity increases risk of cardiovascular comorbidities such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis. It may limit patients' ability to engage in physical activity, increase insulin resistance - which may require higher insulin doses for patients needing insulin and alter neuroendocrine signaling and metabolism.

    54 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear John Wang's recording

    This would be the first time I am auditioning for such a part but I matched the specs they were looking for so I decided to give it a try. Any feedback would be much appreciated!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-91316/script-recording-72687.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The pacing and sound was engaging despite me knowing very little about the content, very impressive

    Peer Feedback:

    Great pacing and pronunciation. I heard a couple of breaths in there which are hard to hide without background music. With a script like this you probably won't get the luxury of background music you can always turn your head when you breath or depending on the editing program you can edit out the breaths but leave the pauses. If your using Adobe Audition CS6 you can actually highlight the breath and turn the volume down to almost eliminate just the sound of the breath. Other than that it sounded great!!!

    Peer Feedback:

    isn't comorbidity pronounced KOE-mor-bid-eh-tee, not com-or-bid-eh-tee.
    I thought I was hearing the latter.

    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for the feedback everyone!

    I edited out a lot of the breathe but some of them went into the next sentence so I couldn't just silence that part. I wasn't sure whether I was supposed to get rid of all the breathe either so I left the small ones in there so it sounds more natural. I've never really done narration so I wasn't sure about this decision either.

    When I looked up the pronunciation (CAN), I heard "com." It might be "koe" if an English accent was used?

    Peer Feedback:

    Liked the pacing and enunciation, very crisp. Felt like I understood what you were talking about even though I'm unfamiliar with these medical terms, lol. Fine job

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    Corneal Epithelium

    Script:

    The corneal epithelium is a thin layer of fast-growing and easily regenerated tissue kept moist by tears. The epithelium absorbs oxygen and cell nutrients from tears, and then distributes these nutrients to the rest of the cornea.

    33 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear ahboggs's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7943/script-recording-33077.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Excellent clarity and good clinical tone for the most part. Some inflections didn't sound quite natural to me, a little sing songy I guess, and you dropped both "by tears" and "from tears" which I think is a mistake.

    Peer Feedback:

    Joyce, I loved the clarity and your diction! I could listen to you for hours and hours!
    Thank you!

    Peer Feedback:

    oops Sorry ansley......I think I "changed" your name....please forgive me!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, guys! I appreciate your feedback! Bill, I hear what you mean about dropping the words!

    Peer Feedback:

    Good clarity and diction. I did hear some echo but maybe it was my monitors. Good job.

    Back to top

    22 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Lukky Salas's recording

    Today I am trying Medical/Pharmaceutical. Is the reading clear and smooth? Lukky

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/ATRIAL FIBRILLATION.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Technically impossible to hear. Volume level is almost non-existent. Also, make your original recording on something other than an mp3. Convert it to mp3 after you're done for better quality.

    Peer Feedback:

    Again, hard to hear, plus what you posted was not for the cornea script.

    Back to top
    Corneal Epithelium

    Script:

    The corneal epithelium is a thin layer of fast-growing and easily regenerated tissue kept moist by tears. The epithelium absorbs oxygen and cell nutrients from tears, and then distributes these nutrients to the rest of the cornea. The part of the epithelium that serves as the foundation on which the epithelial cells anchor and organize themselves is called the basal membrane. The Bowman’s membrane is a transparent sheet of tissue composed of strong, layered protein fibers called collagen. The corneal stroma accounts for 90% of the cornea’s thickness, consisting primarily of water (78%) and collagen (16%). Collagen gives the cornea its strength, elasticity and form. The collagen’s unique shape, arrangement and spacing are essential in making the cornea transparent.

    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MHeyden's recording

    Just practicing . . . any comments appreciated!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10833/script-recording-57400.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Marianne
    To make this sound listenable is an accomplishment and you did it. You're not practicing, you're flogging yourself with a cat-o'-nine tails. Really good!
    BillH

    Peer Feedback:

    Haha, thanks Bill. No wonder it hurt so damn much!!!

    Back to top
    DNA Replication

    Script:

    The process of DNA replication begins with a separation of the double-stranded DNA helix, initiated at multiple steps by enzyme action. As the original DNA unwinds into template strands, DNA polymerase catalyzes the synthesis of new duplicate strands, which reform a double helix with each of the original strands. This is called replication. Each daughter molecule, therefore, contains one of the parental strands. It is estimated that the original DNA molecule present in the fertilized zygote must be copied 10 times during the course of a human lifetime.

    54 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear alexander's recording

    Thanks in advance for your comments on recording quality and vocal performance. I am more interested in thoughts about the recording quality for audition purposes. Thanks again!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3040/script-recording-33140.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Great read,very clear. The first helix should have an upward inflection to indicate there is more to come. in other words, It sounds like it ends with a period. the second time you say strands the same thing happens, it sounds like your ending, but there is still more to come.The third time you say strands makes the sentence sound a little redundant because now your working with the same word in the same sentence and somehow someway they all need to sound a little different from each other. possibly, hitting other words around the "strands" word may help. In the sentence " each daughter molecule,therefore, contains..." I would keep one of those comma's.Without them, the sentence sounds a little run on or rushed. I don't see "10 to the 15th times" in the script. Overall great read, great tone, felt good!

    Best of luck
    Shane

    Peer Feedback:

    sorry,I forgot to comment on your recording. I do hear a hiss. Your voice seems to be nice and clear. Do I think the hiss could hurt you for auditions? Well, it really depends on what the client likes to hear. Some may be Ok with it, others may not. I think the best thing to do would be to remedy the hiss to strengthen your chances. Hope this helps!
    Shane

    Peer Feedback:

    Good quality recording...great technical read, you have an easy to listen to voice.

    Back to top

    113 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cncarlson4's recording

    Checking out a new studio set up. Any noise or other obvious issues? Thanks for the feedback!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-83993/script-recording-76343.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds pretty good. Reasonably full spectrum and no noticeable noise or processing artifacts. Seemed a little heavier on the top end than the bottom but not an issue really.

    Peer Feedback:

    Well, your studio sounds ok...but there's some distortions going on in your file that I have to assume are probably due to either your processing or even the possibility you clipped before you processed your file. It's present a few times and one place...if you want to hear it is in "abnovirus" ...that's just one of a few.

    If you want us to evaluate your processing, put together a clip that has the same read with no processing and then with your processing following it...all in the same clip. Don't compress too much. Keep your sampling frequency higher than 128 for sure...192 is better and 256 would be a lot better. The higher the better.

    I'm not hearing your space. I'm hearing distortions not created by your space.

    Peer Feedback:

    TxTom and touzet,

    Very helpful comments which are much appreciated. The distortions are many and I heard it immediately in "adenovirus." I normalize to -3dB and de-click with Izotope Rx 4, which obviously I'm riding too hard. I don't have a mouth noise problem, so I'll leave that step out completely or back way off on the sensitivity and see if I can get away with some minimal automatic clean-up only if needed. I can up the sampling rate to a max of 192 in Twisted Wave so I will do that as well. Those distortions are not present in the unprocessed file.

    I'm very happy to hear you weren't hearing noise.

    Thanks again!

    Nate

    Peer Feedback:

    I just got a processing stack from George Whittam. He also reminded me that when recording files in Twisted Wave, select best quality, not the default "recommended" quality because "recommended" quality is audibly degraded. I'll do that to and resubmit and see what you all think

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    Exercise for Better Sex

    Script:

    We all know that exercise can tone our bodies, make them healthier and even more attractive. But did you know it can also improve your sex life? Start with a cardiovascular program to get your heart in shape. Next add pelvic exercises that will increase partner satisfaction.

    33 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear erapp1@yahoo.com's recording

    I just put my whisper room together. How does it sound?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-15345/script-recording-36780.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds good to me! Only thing is maybe you might be a little too close to the microphone? I like the pacing.

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance - Start with a cardiovascular program to get your heart in shape. There was a pause after start. To get your heart in shape was read one word at a time in a sing\song way. In my opinion that line was choppy and made for a not so good read. Try again.

    Peer Feedback:

    I hear a little reflection in the room. Is that an actual WhisperRoom? Or something like it? Vocally, you've got some problems with accent/regionalism that you'll most definitely need to address. You can hear it in "partner, heart, cardioVAScular..." You're also a bit halting or choppy. Mouth noises abound.

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    Fibromyalgia

    Script:

    “Fibromyalgia syndrome, or F-M-S, is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people causing widespread pain in joints, tendons and muscles.”

    “Patients feel pain in as many as 18 specific “tender points,” small areas on the body less than an inch across. Even the slightest pressure on a tender point can cause excruciating pain.”

    “Sufferers may describe their pain as a deep persistent ache, stabbing or shooting muscular pain, or a burning sensation just beneath the skin.”

    “Other common symptoms include incapacitating fatigue, depression or anxiety, trouble sleeping, and problems with memory.”

    “To be diagnosed with FMS, the patient must have pain in at least 11 of the 18 tender points, and must have pain in all four quadrants of the body.”

    “Many researchers think the brain and spinal cord process pain messages incorrectly, causing FMS patients to feel pain more intensely.”

    “Physical or emotional trauma may trigger fibromyalgia. People involved in auto accidents, soldiers at war, or others in stressful situations sometimes develop FMS.”

    “Since there is no cure for fibromyalgia, treatment involves managing the symptoms with pain and antidepressant medications, and improving general health with proper exercise, adequate sleep, and a healthy diet.”

    44 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear sherri.gray's recording

    Just trying to figure out the categories where my voice naturally lends itself, and I'm not sure if I have the right balance of medical expertise and emotion with this one. Thoughts?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-124986/script-recording-96084.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Practice on the forum is to post no more than two per 24 hour period. If you notice, your four posts have knocked over recent postings down the page and the further they go down the page, the less chance they'll get any attention. The practice has been "post one, critique two" or "post two, critique four". That way it encourages participation for everyone who is active. You're new, so I'm just letting you know how it's been around the forum.

    Peer Feedback:

    Understood - thanks for letting me know!

    Peer Feedback:

    The other rationale for that is to get (constructive) feedback so that you may apply the techniques and suggestions to subsequent reads. I'm not saying this happened, but if you've developed a certain habit that may need correcting and you just post one after another after another after another, you may not even receive critique at all. No benefit to you.

    Peer Feedback:

    This makes perfect sense and I'm so glad you both took the time to share these best practices with me. Thank you!

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    Functional Training

    Script:

    Welcome to our functional training series. Breaking it down, functional training is simply turning your attention to training the body for movements we perform as we go about our daily lives. Movements like standing , sitting, stepping, reaching, pushing, pulling, getting balanced. Our training series has broken down those movements into a series of workouts to help you draw attention to how you perform those activities on a daily basis. This is designed to bring your awareness to your posture and your form, to the muscle groups that allow you to work in those capacities and hopefully keep you safe and keep you strong.

    28 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MHeyden's recording

    Just looking for feedback on this training video. Although it is an exercise video, I was a bit conflicted about tempo. I wanted to be upbeat, but felt that I needed to slow down at times because I feel that the audience might be a more senior group.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10833/script-recording-57597.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you are right in seeing this script as targeted to seniors. You kept the pace slow enough to be soothing and your inflection kept the energy level upbeat and cheerful at the same time. I think you did well on this read.

    Peer Feedback:

    I'd hit "functional training" harder since it's the jargon you're explaining. Nice with the big list. Liked the coloring on "getting balanced" very much. I'd slow it down a smidge more in the first half, and a lot more in the second half. I just love your voice and you're always so articulate without sounding choppy.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello
    I liked your read a lot as peers commented you are clear easy to listen to. On one of the Saturday classes we talked about breath control in long sentences, in the sentence
    "Our training series has broken down those movements into a series of workouts to help you draw attention to how you perform those activities on a daily basis" you could let yourself take a breath without making the sentence sound choppy. if I hear it correctly you edited that sentence between workouts and to maybe you could take a small pause there, but I might be wrong. Good job overall.
    Regards
    Balazs

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi All - thanks for the feedback. Much appreciated. Balazs - you are exactly right - I did edit out a breath at that exact spot . . . good ears! That is something I struggle with - knowing when it's okay to just breathe within a longer section and allow it to be part of the read . Think I might add that issue to my next coaching session. Thanks much! Marianne

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice voice. Easy to understand.
    You hit a high note on: simply...training...standing" - too much.

    Slow down more starting with "Our training.."

    Lukky

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice up-beat sound to the tone. It could have slowed slightly and kept the smile IMO and still be as good. Recording quality is excellent, but I'm pretty sure I heard either a couple of punch-ins or re-reads that didn't QUITE match the material immediately before it. But we get extra sensitive to that kind of thing with our critical ears on this board. I liked it a lot overall.

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    Germs

    Script:

    A reassessment of diseases that might be infectious has been greatly facilitated by increasingly powerful tools of detection. Kaposi’s sarcoma, known for more than a century as a rare cancer that occurred in elderly men of Mediterranean extraction, was unmasked in the 1980s and 1990s, when a large number of KS cases arose in people whose immune systems were compromised by HIV. Statistical analysis led to the suspicion that the chain of infection was sexual. Over the past decade, scientists have accepted the infectious nature of about a dozen other diseases, including hepatitis C, nasopharyngeal cancer, Whipple’s disease, bacillary angiomatosis, Bell’s palsy, and the “aplastic crises” of sickle-cell anemia.

    68 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Andre Hughes's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Germs.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Andre,

    I thought this was read well. No doubt it does sound like it was read some, but I don't know how you do this script and make it sound conversational. This is not chatting with the neighbor over the fence unless you live in a strange neighborhood. The recoding was clear and clean I thought.

    Because it is so deep I looked at it for obvious signs of EQing the top end out thinking you worked to get this tone. I didn't see anything odd so I pretty much have concluded you sound this way. Lucky you. Still, while no one would want to turn James Earl Jones into a soprano I would like it sound a little less muddy, so I am all in favor of adding a little above around 2K for a brighter sound. If you are playing around with a "tube" preamp software or hardware or anything that adds to the low end - stop. You don't need it.

    There is occasionally a strange squeak in your S's. Not normal sibilance, but a high pitched and loud whistle. With your voice I would expect sibilance to be maybe 4 -6K. Listen to the C near the end in hepatitis C. It whistles right around 10K. It happens several times in this script and I think needs to be edited as I found it very distracting. You are not winning my audition with that in there. I tried some EQ on that occurrence and knocked it down about 10 dB in a pretty tight band centered around 10K and I thought it sounded better. Just do the S's where it whistles not the entire file (yeah I know that's a lot of work).

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback Tom. The only thing that I did to the recording was the normalization. I will try to work on the EQ as you mentioned. Thanks again!

    Peer Feedback:

    I will point out a specific thing that hit my ears.
    "Karposi Sarcoma that has been known for more than a century as a rare cancer..."
    You're using a higher pitch at the end of the word cancer and at the end of the word century that might actually be better suited with a downward inflection. I think that this type of thing might lead people to feel it was not conversational. If you were really saying this sentence, those words would be different. more than a century(lower) as a rare cancer(lower) and emphasis the words "more than" and "rare".

    I love your tone and your voice is actually beautiful.

    Peer Feedback:

    First of all, I love the sound of your voice--the timbre is fantastic! I thought your delivery was clear and clean-sounding.

    I noticed that you inserted some words into the script that were not there (e.g., "by *the* increasingly" and "occurred *only* in elderly"). Also, I thought the pauses between the different diseases were just a bit too long; try shortening the pauses so that the list sounds smoother.

    Overall, I thought it was a very nice read--good job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Your current settings/setup is a little sibilant. I had to pull my headphones off my skull to listen through the whole thing. Are you EQing your upper sound?

    Back to top
    Homecall

    Script:

    Today in the United States, over 10 million people need help with their daily activities -- from simple eating or bathing, to round-the-clock nursing. 70% live at home -- and desperately want to remain there -- if help is available. HomeCall exists to enable them to remain at home ... in comfort ... with privacy and independence. Years ago, HomeCall recognized that all across the country there was a growing need for services that make it feasible for older persons to remain in their homes ... rather than make the heartbreaking move to an institution. So we supplied homemaking services such as meal preparation, light housekeeping, and personal care.

    109 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Skmigs's recording

    So literally my first day doing this. I do not have a developed ear yet so any comments on audio quality are appreciated. I also am a complete novice with the editing aspect (I'm using Twisted Wave). I was told to take out the breaths while editing… but is that just for between sentences, or quick breaths in between thoughts? Because I took out all of them and I think it makes the recording sound very strange. Anyway, thanks in advance for the help!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-94626/script-recording-76204.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Pretty great for your first day. I'm relatively new at this too, but I've come around to the view that technology plays a back seat to the instrument, namely your voice. Rather than worry about deleting all the breaths, try to learn how to breathe during a read in such a way that it's not offensive to the ear (I don't yet know how to do this, but I know it can be done...see "Excerpt: American Carnage: Wounded Knee 1890" recently recorded by jamesromick). I edit out my great heaving gasps between sentences, and I try to take sips of air mid sentence (planned in advance with marks on the script) and leave those "sips" in the recording.

    So people will tell you about levels, and background noise, and a high pass filter, and the noise at the end of the recording. That's useful, but keep your eye on making sure you know the script, that you love the script, that you care deeply about the subject matter so that your listeners will too. That, I think, is the part most deserving of your early efforts. And once you've mastered it, you'll be recording in a studio, with an engineer and a director to sweat the tech stuff while you just play your instrument.

    I too use TwistedWave. Here's how I do it: http://youtu.be/QP9mOsa9dss

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you so much, that's helpful. And the video is exactly what I needed today after repeatedly yelling at Twisted Wave when I was trying to edit. ;) Will check out the other recording as well for the breath technique. Thanks again!

    Peer Feedback:

    There was a piece of advice that I got from a home inspector when I bought my first fixer-upper. He told me, "Do it a room at a time. That way you won't make yourself crazy."

    The same kind of idea applies to VO. When you're first getting your feet wet, concentrate on one thing at a time, don't take it all on and let it overwhelm you. And as you post recordings, clue us in as to what it is that your goal might be for that particular submission to help you get the specific feedback you require.

    spblat offers good advice in that, fundamentally, it is how you interpret and relate to the script that should probably be the first priority. Recording quality, mic technique, editing, manipulating the recording (EQ-ing and FX processing) and all of that will come in time.

    Another fundamental thing is to recognize and slightly "billboard" the product or service that the commercial is about. There's a long set-up here. HomeCall isn't mentioned until about 1/3 of the way into the copy. And you ran right over it! Both times! All of this other stuff is important, yes. But it's really just background and reasons why you should have this service. The service that you're advertising, HomeCall, is only mentioned twice, therefore it needs to be emphasized and clearly understood to be the focus of this narrative - without it sounding like a sales pitch.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you. You're right and I did not notice how I ran over the name of the service.

    Specifics: the mic. I have that 30 day return policy so I was wondering how it sounded. I went to B&H and tried a bunch... my ear just isn't discerning the nuances yet. I wound up with a mic the sales guy recommended, and I like it fine, but is there anything in the recording sound-wise that struck you wrong? Sorry if these are ignorant questions, but it's a big investment.

    Peer Feedback:

    Did you talk to my good friend Bill Dexter at B&H? He won't steer you wrong. But realize that B&H's sound system is top of the line, so the mic you bought is going to sound very different in your particular recording environment. However, they will help you find the mic that suits your voice.

    Did you get a USB mic or a mic with an interface? And if so, which one(s)? (mic and/or interface)

    And did you explain to whomever you talked to that you were going to use it for VO and not music production or simple podcasts? There's a difference.

    Realize though that no mic, no matter the quality or the price, will serve you well if you do not have a sound deadened, treated space in which to record. An inexpensive mic will sound just fine if you have a well treated space (along with some other factors mentioned below). Those mud flaps things and porta-booths are limited and not the ideal answer if you intend to audition and/or produce quality recordings from your home studio. It doesn't necessarily have to be an expensive or elaborate proposition to create an acceptable recording environment. There is a little reflection (echo) to this recording which means that you probably need to treat your recording space get it "deader", less reflective of hard surfaces like hardwood floors and drywall walls and ceilings.

    The software you use isn't a huge issue, it depends on what you are comfortable with using and how steep a learning curve you are willing to tackle. They all only understand the 1's and 0's that go into your computer, they have slightly different looks, some different bells and whistles, some common features and different levels of user-friendlinesses. I noticed that you've edited out most of the breaths, so I assume that you are somewhat familiar with editing (although you missed the "click-off" at the end. More about that later.). Different people have different preferences. My DWA of choice is Reaper.

    http://www.reaper.fm/

    I hear some "thumping" in this recording (different from the popping plosive issues) that sounds like you've bumped the mic stand or the surface on which the mic is mounted. Pop screens are effective for plosives, but can only catch so much. It is better to practice good mic technique than to rely on a pop filter alone.

    What is your recording environment? Is the mic on a stand (with a shock mount) or placed on a shelf? Are you sitting or standing? (Standing is better. You use the energy of your entire body that way and you can be more animated.) How close are you getting (what is your proximity) to the mic? (That "hang five" position is a good place to start.) Are you monitoring yourself as you record with a set of good studio grade headphones? (Over the ear, closed back ones. Not the commercial grade ones like Beats, noise cancelling ones like Bose or simple earbuds. Another thing to talk to my friend at B&H about.) Is your computer close to the mic? (The mic will pick up fan noise and mouse and keyboard clicks, and possibly even some electronic interference which may create "line noise" in your recordings. No line noise in this recording, but the detectable click-off at the end signals to me that you've placed your mic pretty close to your computer.)

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you so much, this is all very useful information.

    Yes, it was indeed Bill that helped me! Great guy. I bought the latest Apogee mic. Originally I was only looking at interface mics, due to the advice in the home studio class. But Bill felt the quality on the Apogee was just as good, and it would be better suited to me (and my very limited technical skills!). It is quite easy to use. But like I said, I don't have a good year for sound yet.

    I am recording in a closet with moving blankets on the sides and pillows above my head. If you are hearing echo though, I will need to improve upon it. I would love to be standing up, but there isn't room there for me to do so. This is a temporary set up until we move in June; then I will have the space to set up something more ideal. But in the meantime, I want to make the most of what I have. Are there other materials you would recommend inside the closet to deaden sound other than what I am using?

    No, not familiar with editing. I just found the "silence" option and used it with the breaths. Hoping to learn it as I go, and will check out Reaper as well.

    Mic is on stand. Didn't even know what a shock mount was and had to Google that! Do you recommend a particular one?

    I am "hanging five" from the mic. (Or rather, from the pop filter.)

    I do have Sony 7506 headphones. I'm having a really hard time using them, however. I feel like I am hearing my voice with a slight delay through the headphones. Is this normal? I didn't experience that in the B&H store. Maybe it is my set up? But it's very distracting, so I have not been using them.

    The computer is close to the mic only because I have no other choice in there. But your advice is helpful and I will have to keep that in mind for when we move. In the meantime, yes, I definitely need to learn how to work better with the mic so there are no extraneous noises on the recording.

    Hope I have not scared you off with my many questions. ;) It is a wonderful blessing to get help from those in the know.

    Peer Feedback:

    Since you're using the Apogee, I am assuming that you are also using a Mac. I am not as familiar with that architecture as I work with a PC.

    The delay you are hearing is called "latency" - it's the slight delay that comes from the way your computer processes the signal coming from the mic through the sound card and into the output to your headphones. Which also leads me to assume that it is a USB mic that is going directly into your computer with no interface in between. If you were using an interface (which is the way you heard it at B&H), you would plug your headphones (which are great, by the way) directly into that rather than listening to yourself through the computer - no latency issue that way. Latency can also be something that is happening with your software too. There also may be a way to adjust the preferences on your computer to minimize latency, but I'm not at all sure about that. Other Mac guys might be able to advise you on the latency issue. Or you can Google it. There may even be some answers on YouTube as well.

    I just looked at the Apogee MiC 96k on the B&H website. Is that the one? Not sure that you can mount it in a shock mount. And if you are using the stand that comes with it, place it on some sort of padding and not on a hard surface as it will pick up vibrations and transfer them to the mic - thus the thumping sounds.

    You didn't mention which software you are using either, but I am further assuming that it is a stock Mac product that came with the OS, like Garage Band or something. Not the best solution for VO, IMHO. I'm not a Mac guy, so others may take me to task for that. But along with my assumption is that you just used some sort of "preset" in the software to eliminate the breath sounds rather than actually manually minimizing them or snipping them out of the wave form. That preset is similar to using what is called a "noise gate", it reduces the sounds it is preset for (in this case breaths) to zero volume - it's like flipping a switch off and flipping it back on again when the software detects actual vocal frequencies. Again, not an ideal thing because they're not fool proof and may leave sonic artifacts or clip of the ends of some words that it may detect (think) is a breath sound. Better to learn how to edit and use specific processing effects rather than rely on presets which are only generically general and geared more towards the average consumer.

    Just went back and read some of the other comments. Twisted Wave is the program you should attempt to conquer. Lots of useful YouTube tutorials. George Whittam (Whittam's World for Edge and EWABS) is a huge proponent.

    Bill at B&H is a great guy. I recommend him to everyone.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the tips -- I will look into Whittam's World. I like how Twisted Wave is set up, but it's very trial and error for me now. (I did manually eliminate the breaths with the "silence" function. It doesn't actually cut them out per se, just adds silence over the section you highlight.)

    Yes, it is the Apogee MiC 96k and I use a macbook. I bought a stand for it, rather than use the desk mount it comes with. Will try paddoing underneath. But I am rather concerned about the latency -- thank you for the explanation, btw. I will do some research now, and I hope it's an easily corrected problem. Otherwise I think I'll have to return the Apogee and go with a mic with an interface. It's too distracting a problem otherwise.

    Peer Feedback:

    The Apogee is a really good mic. And I wouldn't want to contradict Bill, but I think your original instinct is correct in going with a mic and interface. He will be able to set you up with that too. He might have not fully comprehended what your purpose was. No latency issues with an interface, and you don't really have to break the bank on one for your setup. Bill will do you right.

    Ain't B&H somethin'? Never seen a setup like it. If I'm in the neighborhood, I sometimes just go in to gawk and drool.

    Sweat it out, but master Twisted Wave. You'll be glad you did.

    Oh, and get a USB extension so you can move your computer further away from your mic/interface in your recording environment.

    Peer Feedback:

    I just made several adjustments on Twisted Wave and to my system preferences that are supposed to mitigate the latency issue. We'll see. But otherwise we'll head back to B&H after the holiday and trade it in. Yes, it's quite extraordinary in there. My husband is rather excited about my vo work now that he knows he includes shopping in a store like that. ;)

    Yes, will get the extension. Thank you again for all this help, it's invaluable.

    Peer Feedback:

    I thought I spotted a headphone jack on the bottom, but their website specifies "input only" and that means that any monitoring is through your computer or tablet/iPhone. So, the real trick is to reduce that latency to near or absolute zero. Otherwise, monitoring just really messes with your brain while you try and speak.

    I use an Apogee One and if I choose to monitor, I get such a slight latency, it doesn't affect me. But if I had a suggestion, I would say to make absolute positive that your computer doesn't have any other programs running while you're recording. Don't force the computer into using virtual memory. Not knowing how much RAM you have, but I'm kinda assuming you're using a MacBook since you say it's close to the MiC in the closet...presuming a portable Mac. Most MacBooks of the past couple years are coming with 2GB of RAM. With the OS taking more and more RAM, there's not much left before virtual memory is being used. And what that means is that the programs being used are having to write things to the hard drive as they're working instead of simply doing it in the electronic (and really fast) computing space. Trying to explain it simply...if you have less RAM than your programs and operating system are requiring, the computer then begins relegating "virtual RAM" to the hard drive and then is able to work beyond the limitations of your physical RAM.

    So...if you can keep your recordings down to ONLY the absolute minimum...Twisted Wave and nothing else running at the same time, you might find an improvement on the latency issue.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you. That makes sense. (I've learned more about how a computer works this week than I have the rest of my life, thanks to starting VO and the generosity of the knowledgable folks on this website!). Will try today with only Twisted Wave working and hear if there's a difference.

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    64 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear ecstern's recording

    Hydroxylation of an alkene, the addition of an –OH group to each of the two alkene carbons---can be carried out with reagents such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and osmium tetraoxide (OsO4) Since oxygen is added to the alkene during the reaction, we call this an oxidation. Both of these hydroxylation reactions occur with syn, rather than anti, stereochemistry and yield 1,2-dialcohols (diols, also called glycols).

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113588/script-recording-97796.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Recording quality sounds great, as does your performance. Very conversational, talking to me and not at me. I like it a lot.

    Peer Feedback:

    Well done - you definitely sound like you know your subject matter, so it inspires confidence. I think you give it just the right amount of excitement that it deserves (could be very dry) without going over the top.

    Sounds a little rushed, mostly the pauses between sentences. Needs an extra half beat in there. Did you edit the pauses between the lines?

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    IHES and PD

    Script:

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) is one of a group of intrinsic pulmonary eosinophilic syndromes that are idiopathic in nature. Aggressive therapies can include busulfan, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin-A, etoposide, azathioprine, hydroxyurea, vincristine, or interferon alfa. Imatinib is used in myeloproliferative IHES.

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) often involves risk of pancreatic anastomotic leakage. To perform a safe and reliable pancreaticoenteric anastomosis with minimal leakage, most surgeons rely on binding pancreaticojejunostomy--also known as Whipple’s procedure.

    98 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jrandy's recording

    How do you list several tongue-twisters?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-117268/script-recording-93788.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    JRandy,

    Fantastic elocution . Vocals sound a little weak? Could be you were too far from mic. Other wise good job!

    Peer Feedback:

    wow. pancreaticojejunostomy is right up there with Eyafjallajokull and Papahānaumokuākea.

    nice work on a terrifying script.

    DS

    Peer Feedback:

    You clearly have exposure to the medical field in some way. Your read flowed quite effortlessly in that regard and I have to assume your pronunciations were on the mark because there's few references to check out to determine right or wrong. What I WOULD suggest for a medical read is to narrow the range of inflection to a less casual feel. I comes across to me like you're reading this like you might a fiction read to children....and further...SLOW DOWN. This is really sounding rushed to me. Even to people familiar with the drugs being discussed, I think you need to slow down the delivery.

    It's not a familiar field to me...but I've listened to and watched quite a few drug ads and medical discussion videos while waiting in my (several) doctor's offices waiting areas.

    You have some definite skill with the really difficult medical terms. Your voice is pleasant. Work on pacing and you'll improve. Hope that helps. Nice work.

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    Laser Skin Treatments

    Script:

    Laser Skin Treatments
    Lately, it seems that every time you walk into a dermatologist’s office, the doctor wants to whip out his latest toy--the laser. Broken blood vessels? No problem at all. let’s laser them. Scars? One single zap and they’re gone. Ditto for moles, wrinkles, excess hair, tattoos, stretch marks--you name it. But according to Dr. Roy Geronemus, director of the Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, “There’s a huge list of things that can be done with lasers, but they’re also being overused and abused, and some salons and even doctors are making claims that can’t be backed up yet.” In this video, we tell you the hype-free truth about the various top laser treatments--including when you might be better off with a low-tech alternative.

    29 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear erapp1@yahoo.com's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/LASER SKIN TREATMENTS.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hm. This slower, easy-going read with elongated words made this read much lower in energy than your usual read. It didn't quite work for me. The copy is a real mix with the joke in the beginning and the more professional ending, isn't it? I tried to break it down myself and wasn't quite sure what I'd do with it other than more energy. "Energy" is my word of the week, by the way, after getting a critique from a coach that an mp3 of mine was too low in energy, so I'm pretty much going to project that onto the entire forum. ;)

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked the inflections in your voice, but the read came across as slow to me, even for a video. The tone comes across to me as a depressing one and really doesn't change much from that through the end where you mention the hopeful alternative. I think that's because of the slow pacing?

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for your comments. I will definitely have more energy in my next read and quicken the pace.

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    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear erapp1@yahoo.com's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/LaserSkin2.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The recording quality sounded pretty good to me, but the biggest problem here was the lack of energy. It sounded very much like a read performance.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with MusicJunkieK1; recording quality is good, but the read is a little slow and subdued. Also hearing a slight accent. Maybe speed up the pacing and work on not drawing out each word so much. Otherwise, I think your voice is well-suited for this type of narration.

    Peer Feedback:

    I think this second take is still low in energy and needs to be faster. I hear variations from your first take, and more pitch range, but the overall tone and feel is similar to the first. Consider, too, that the last was 56 sec and this is 58.

    Try standing? Pretending the person you're talking to is a little further away? Going super perky for a read and then pulling back for more of a compromise?

    Have you rehearsed it a lot? You could be stuck in a certain read with this one. Scott Burns had a fun idea in a Sat technique class, recently. He suggested putting on a "character cloak" for a read--pretending you're a certain character and using that character to do the read. ex. excited cheerleader, a particular actress, et cetera. Could be worth a try.

    Or you could eat chocolates and watch junky TV. That's about all the energy I have right now with the pollen that's currently polluting my world. Blah!

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    18 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Kate's recording

    All feedback welcome. Thanks Kate

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7330/script-recording-34788.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice voice and nice read. Good pacing and control. You made something scary like laser treatment, sound harmless and helpful. Very believable. Well done.

    Peer Feedback:

    You could make cobra baiting sound perfectly safe. The accent is killer and just makes me want to listen to more. I already had laser eye surgery but now looking into laser skin treatments! The only thing I noticed is that you dropped off on the plural of patients...without a script to read it took three listens to realize it was plural.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks to you both for the feedback - yes you are absolutely right, I did drop the "s" on patients. How was audio quality? Just curious to know what you thought about that. Thanks again for the kind words Kate

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    Medical Marijuana (Myths and Realities) Narration

    Script:

    Marijuana, also know as cannabis, has been used for more than 3,000 years for the treatment and management of pain, digestive issues and psychological disorders. Despite the fact that marijuana is thought to be useful for treating several medical conditions and symptoms, there is great debate about its safety and efficacy. Yet a growing number of states are legalizing its use for the treatment and management of certain medical conditions.

    95 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear psjones's recording

    I had a difficult time choosing the MB. Perhaps it would be better without music?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-91843/script-recording-81570.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    psjones -
    I liked the read. a couple thoughts:

    I thought the pace might have been a bit rushed. maybe a little more pausing between sentences would make it feel a bit more natural.
    Also, if I were you, I'd round out your "and"s a bit more - they sound like "ained" rhymes with "rained".

    regarding music bed, it's a matter of taste. I can see you're going for a little bit of a mystical sounding theme. all the more reason to slow down the delivery.

    I can still hear some room noise. it's worth the time to get rid of that.

    DS

    Peer Feedback:

    Dave, Thanks for listening and your suggestions. I tried to fit this script into a 30 sec spot and unfortunately it does seemed a bit rushed. The room noise varies in my recording room which is always a challenge. Sometimes it's minimal or non existent and other times more noticeable, like in this recording. It also seems to vary within this 30 sec slot. But that is something I can fix. Also I do have a tendency to have "lazy mouth" and drop the last consonant in certain words and adding music makes it more noticeable. My natural speaking habits (I talk too fast) are spilling over into VO and that I need to be constantly aware of and correct. Of course I can over compensate at times and over articulate. I have to find common ground. Your observations were spot on and I really appreciate it. Thanks again for taking the time to help out. -psj

    Peer Feedback:

    One of the things to notice (and it would be more apparent if you got actual specs with the copy) is to know what "genre" the copy fits into. The clue here is in the title:

    Medical Marijuana (Myths and Realities) Narration

    It's not a commercial, but maybe part of a medical presentation, drug policy narration, explainer video or the like. So, unless the spec also mentions it, there is no real time constraint. Thus limiting yourself to :30 was probably a mis-assumption. Things I've seen in the spec for something like this are: Conversational, informative but not preachy, friendly but authoritative - like you're familiar with the subject, persuasive but not opinionated, informational in a friendly sort of way. Lots of contradictory types of direction. You may even get something like: "We're looking for an Alac Baldwin or Morgan Freeman delivery." That doesn't mean to imitate them, just to deliver it in that flavor and style.

    Thought I heard some Canadian or Northern Midwest in here on the word "about". And as Dave mentioned, the sharp, nasal A's on "and" need some rounding off.

    Also hear a little echo/room noise in here. Some additional sound deadening for your recording space may be in order. Not easy to eliminate or lessen that in the software alone.

    Peer Feedback:

    Now THIS is my kind of narrative copy! :D I am very well versed in this stuff right here (the 420 in my name isn't just recreational -I'm starting my own informative podcast on MMJ!) Great choice! lol

    You punched every single "and" in this script. While you can definitely find an and to hit in this one, punching every single one really takes away from the effect and just makes it annoying instead. As far as the MB, it's not my taste either and I wouldn't put it in an audition, but it is right on par with the types of MB I hear in many narrative videos about cannabis -pro and con (but mostly pro).

    I felt like you needed to be more relaxed (hahhaha it's a weed video -or article) and involved; the rushing kept you from sounding connected. Mostly I'd like to hear more of the conflict in your delivery (thought, despite, yet) -the irony of this situation is lost.

    Peer Feedback:

    James and bean, thanks for listening. Love the feedback. James, I was trying to possibly make this part of a Educational demo for the future and felt I needed to keep it to 30 seconds, (thus my mis-assumption). The whole script is very lengthy, perhaps 2 full pages. This was only the intro. But your point is well taken, it made me rush! (not good). It's amazing how a simple word like "and" and "to" can cause conflict in my reads. Like bean said, when to punch when not to punch. Trouble is I sometimes say "ta" instead of "to" and 'an" instead of "and". So the trick is when to say these words appropriately. I have an extensive medical background so I have a limitless supply of source material right at home, and this was my first "medical" post on here. More to come, most likely.
    Bean, so true about punching too often, I feel like I'm over-articulating, which is the opposite of "lazy mouth" :), another challenge for me. Your point about being more relaxed and add a bit of diversity in delivery to certain words would be much easier if read more deliberately, great point. BTW, I'm neither Canadian nor a Midwesterner. This is good and bad, because I'm hiding my real regional accent (good) but creating another (not on purpose-bad), oh dear! Great discussion folks, your the best.

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    Medical Research

    Script:

    Medical research (or experimental medicine) is basic research or applied research conducted to aid the body of knowledge in the field of medicine.

    Medical research can be divided into two general categories:
    the evaluation of new treatments for both safety and efficacy in what are termed clinical trials, and all other research that contributes to the development of new treatments.
    The latter is termed preclinical research if its goal is specifically to elaborate knowledge for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

    87 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear gheilweil66's recording

    Been awhile since I've used the forum here. Hoping to get back in more often starting with this piece.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113914/script-recording-92507.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds like you stumbled just before starting the second paragraph. Thought I heard a slight groan. Also heard breaths during pauses.

    Peer Feedback:

    Could be smoothed out by timing breaths during natural pauses instead of in the middle of sentences. Pacing was also a bit slow and it could use a bit more energy. It's a serious piece that shouldn't be rushed, but it seemed slightly drawn-out. Submit another recording, if you want - it's not bad, just needs some polishing.

    Peer Feedback:

    The basics are there but a couple of pointers: maybe drop a half pitch when speaking parenthetically so the listener clearly knows you are speaking in parenthesis.
    The second paragraph begins a little high in pitch which could give it a bit of a dubious tone rather than a confident explanatory one. Good initial efforts!

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    Medical Video Presentation

    Script:

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive process in which CV inflammation plays an important role. In the presence of inflammatory stimuli, such as elevated LDL-C, atherosclerosis develops as vascular endothelial cells express adhesion molecules that capture monocytes on the arterial wall.

    At the same time, changes in the permeability of the arterial wall allow the entry and retention of LDL-C particles and monocytes. As monocytes enter the arterial wall, they engulf LDL-C particles and become lipid-filled macrophages which aggregate as fatty streaks—the hallmark of early atherosclerosis and plaque development.

    76 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear kenbond's recording

    Audience is mainly medical professionals so going for informative and authoritative. A lot of challenging words to pronounce, especially atherosclerosis! Lol.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113659/script-recording-98190.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Copy Interpretation - good articulation of medical terminology.

    Vocal performance - you seemed to really be emphasizing certain words almost as a pattern - 1st sentence 'process' 'CV' 'important' 2nd presence, inflammatory, stimuli, elevated ect. might try to make it smoother flowing without punching so many.

    Recording - I did hear your breaths, I would take them out.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ken --
    Not having listened to your reads in over a year, I can say that you've gotten a lot more relaxed and have smoothed out the delivery a lot. This is a nice read. I liked the continuous flow vs. the lilt in deliveries of the past. Practice makes perfect. I told you a long time ago that after 1,000 reads, you'll be much better. So it seems.

    cheers!
    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    Dave - That means a lot coming from you. Thank you! You were right. Just need to keep plugging away. And I know I still have more to learn but I'm enjoying the ride.

    Back to top
    Mitrochondrial Encephalomyopathies

    Script:

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders in which mitochondrial dysfunction produces clinical disease. In the central and peripheral neuromuscular systems, they include such diverse disorders as Alper’s disease, a progressive cerebral poliodystrophy of infancy, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, a relatively benign disorder characterized by exercise-induced myoglobinuria. Mitochondrial myopathies are diseases in which the clinical presentation and course of illness are dominated by pathologic involvement of muscle.

    28 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Sherrill S's recording

    Trying a tongue-twisting medical read.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-12306/script-recording-53394.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I thought that the recording quality was good. The voice actor's performance is very credible.

    Peer Feedback:

    OK, I tried to say the first sentence, and I now know this is not for me, hahaha, at least not yet. Sherrill your voice and delivery sounded "patient," like an experienced nurse or doctor explaining new material to, say, young med students or something. Very pleasant and relaxed.

    The only thing I would change is to enunciate "of" clearly in "group of disorders." It sounded to me like "groupa' disorders," which would probably be OK for a more casual radio spot (I have to catch myself when I say "ta' " instead of "to" sometimes). :)

    Peer Feedback:

    I like the recording sounded convincing to me. I commend you for your pronouncement of the medical terminology.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks everyone for you comments. Thanks Elisa for your suggestions. I am really trying to work on speaking clearly. As a Californian my "ta" for "to" is hard to break.

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    Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Script:

    Although pathologic concepts regarding squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma have remained relatively stable during the past 10 years, those regarding the class of neuroendocrine tumors have continued to undergo revision and refinement. Neuroendocrine tumors are defined as those that produce biogenic amines. Pathologically, this can be demonstrated by a positive argyrophil or argentaffin stain, the presence of nerursecretory granules by electron microscopy

    30 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Andre Hughes's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/neuroendocrine tumor.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I love your deep clear voice. My comment is on the first word "although", and the word "those" were the most noticeable words in the first sentence. I'm trying myself to really learn to place more emphasis on words that define the message more than ancillary words. You have no room sounds as far as I can tell (I'm on my laptop with no headphones). No echo or hiss. Your voice sounds very trust worthy and kind.

    Listen to this script if any others have worked on it, and pay attention to just the first sentence to see where they are emphasizing things.

    Keep going!

    Peer Feedback:

    Andre,

    Love the timbre of your voice as well as your clarity. Your pronunciation is spot on except for "adenocarcinoma." I believe the emphasis is on the first syllable, not the second. I've worked in the medical field for quite a while, so I've heard that word plenty.

    The quality of your recording sounds great.

    Looking forward to hearing more from you.

    Deidre

    Peer Feedback:

    Andre,
    You have a reassuring and grounded quality in your voice and listening to your pronunciation was effortless (I did feel like you struggled to say them). I would comment on the inflection or the cadence of the reading, while the words came out, i couldn't follow the flow and function of the sentence. Can't wait to hear more.

    Peer Feedback:

    Andre,

    Great pipes! Medical reads are and will be the the most challenging to read. Watch your pronunciations,and direction or flow. A sentence is always going somewhere with info. If you just hit or build up to the nouns you'll be in fat city! Keep voicing!

    Peer Feedback:

    Lovely quality to your voice...but be careful to hold on to your audience...the mellow quality with such technical terminology could lose their interest. The challenge with medical reads is to keep it fresh and interesting....

    Back to top
    Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Script:

    Neuroendocrine Tumors
    Although pathologic concepts regarding squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma have remained relatively stable during the past 10 years, those regarding the class of neuroendocrine tumors have continued to undergo revision and refinement. Neuroendocrine tumors are defined as those that produce biogenic amines. Pathologically, this can be demonstrated by a positive argyrophil or argentaffin stain, the presence of nerursecretory granules by electron microscopy.

    95 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear fostertalk's recording

    I have a new RODE NT1000 mic for voice work and was wondering about its studio quality and such... THX! :)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-97258/script-recording-92057.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow fostertalk you've got some tough words in there. It seems like your volume increases at the beginning of those words. I also think the pause after "Pathologically" is a little too long. It doesn't flow the way a normal conversation would.

    Peer Feedback:

    Whoa! You're recording too hot. Either that or you normalized the file to 0dB or higher. Research recommended guidelines for VO rendering. Usually the peak level shouldn't be above -3dB for a comfortable listening level. Also sounds like you used a noise gate because there is some "fuzz" or noise underlying the VO, but it is not present in the "gaps" between phrases where there is total silence. That creates a kind of "pumping" effect which is disturbing to the listener, even if they don't quite know why. And it psychologically creates anxiety, especially with long form narration. It's the equivalent of turning a light switch on and off in a windowless room while trying to walk from one end to the other.

    You also may be working a little too close to the mic. Pulling back even a half inch or an inch makes a big difference. It may also help with the plosive popping, but you'll probably still need a pop filter.

    Peer Feedback:

    Over-modulation can be very distracting, but I tried to look past that. We've all been there, and it's easy to fix. James gave good points, above. The pacing was fine and your voice seems well-suited for this type of read. Nice and clear. I look forward to hearing more!

    Back to top

    18 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lcw115's recording

    Recorded this script awhile ago. Sound quality may be a little off, as using mini-laptop with built-in microphone and editing with Audity. However would like comments about performance. Also would appreciate constructive and positive feedback. Thank you.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7256/script-recording-26907.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm sure I've heard this on the radio. Performance, great. The tone you used in each sentence to emphasize a point all sounded natural and the read was slow but deliberate. It sounded like "an older friend telling me something I didn't know about osteoporosis. Mature lady voice, great one again! Nodo420

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you Nodo, you're really giving me a lot of confidence! That's what I was hoping for in the delivery to be at pace where the audience could relate to information given. You're work is great and looking forward to your next script. Best of luck, LCW.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Lcw,
    This was well done. Must agree with Nodo, your tone is very natural and conversational, very good vocal performance, you connected with the audience emotionally and made the message memorable in the mind of the listener. Good job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Michael,

    Thank you, so much! I'm trying to find a genre for my voice whereas I like Narration, Documentary and certain commercials, and may do a script for an Audiobook. Also, working on the pacing and the pitch and just the basics of VO's. Once again, thank you for your comment and I will be waiting to hear your next script! Best of luck, LCW.

    Back to top

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lcw115's recording

    As I mentioned, I am justing seeking comments on performance as I am practicing with scripts. I will be re-recording a majority of scripts in the future using better sound equipment and adding music tracks to some of them. Please comment on performance. Thank you.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7256/script-recording-26296.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    It's really hard to judge this one. The recording quality was not good. Your read may have been very good, I believe I have heard some of your other work. I am not sure if it was the original recording quality that was poor or the format you saved it under, lots of loss. Please record another and be sure to choose the highest quality when you save it.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks sreagor, I will do this over. I know it's somewhat difficult for my Peers to judge a script with the sound editing software I have, but I just wanted to focus on the read and the performance. As I mentioned, I'm going to be doing a lot of scripts over using better equipment for the recordings. I will do this one over and I may take a hiatus for a few weeks to focus on my practicing. Thanks for your comment.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi,
    Thanks for the comments. I was exactly where you are right now when it comes to editing and adding sound a few months ago. With a little practice you'll be light years ahead of where you are presently. I still have a lot to learn myself when it comes to Audacity. Email me at Earthbul@Hotmail.com and hopefully I can help you out. Take care.
    Jerry

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance - you read to slow, remember you are speaking to older people some who might have difficulty hearing so a higher volume is better, you were not speaking to a single person. Try again. I could hear you fine...no concern about the equipment. try again.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Jerry and Sabrina. Jerry I will send and e-mail to you and I appreciate your help. Sabrina, I know what you mean about the pacing. I read the script somewhat slower because I have a tendency to read fast, so because this was a script about a medical condition, I went for a slower pace. However, I will do this one over in the future. Once again, thank you both for your helpful comments.

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    Pharmacy Locator

    Script:

    Welcome to the Automated Pharmacy Locator.
    Please enter your 11-digit account number now.
    Please hold while we access your account information.
    Please enter the five-digit zip code for the area in which you would like to locate a participating pharmacy now.
    Please hold while I check for your participating pharmacies.
    The pharmacies in the area you selected are Walgreens and CVS and John's Pharmacy
    If this concludes your call, simply hang up, or you can stay on the line to enter another zip code.

    39 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear erapp1@yahoo.com's recording

    Please let me know if you hear any regionalisms.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-15345/script-recording-49048.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello! Nice read. You have a nice soothing sound. I did hear some regionalism.

    Sounds like Please Hole vs hold, area sounds like airy. Overall very pleasant. Maybe a bit more energy in the read. But overall good.

    Peer Feedback:

    You go from diction that might be slightly too precise to some that need more precision. The line "please hold....account information" has a few under pronounced syllables where there's a few 't's that might have too much put to them. There is a LOT of mouth noise. You'll want to hydrate better to minimize the noises. Pleasant voice, but I would have preferred just a little more smile. Good luck.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ditto to TxTom's critique. Since this telephony, leave spaces between instructions for a response. I know that an engineer would do that anyway, but it gives you a little space to make a slightly different read from one instruction to another, maybe one "up" and another one "down", inflection-wise. Smile.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with the above comments. sounds a bit synthetic/artificial too me rather than natural in the delivery.

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    Running Basics

    Script:

    Run faster by relaxing. Almost any runner who can look less tortured while running will probably run faster. For that "less tortured" look, concentrate on this sequence:
    1. Most important, relax your jaw. If you can relax your jaw, everything starts to open up.
    2. Consciously drop your shoulders. They should be loose and down, not tightly bunched up around your ears.
    3. Shake out your hands and arms.
    4. Think "smooth, efficient, fast." Say it again: "Smooth, efficient, fast."

    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Crystal's recording

    I'm working on sound quality and need to know from you all how my sound is. I'm using a MacBook Pro with Twisted Wave. Just tweaked this copy a little with Amplify and Normalization. Help, ideas...whatever... are all appreciated. If my recording is flat, too fast, or disjointed...go ahead and tell me. I can take it... Thank you

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-409/script-recording-47784.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You have a good voice for this but you were rushing the script a little. I just listened to it a second time and realized why it sounded rushed. Are you recording a line at a time? If so - DON'T. It is very important that you learn to deliver the read in one shot. By reading in sentences you lose the flow of your natural delivery. the sentences become unnatural and choppy. So before recording know your script inside and out. That way the story or information you share will flow like thoughts and not like sentences. Hope this helps. If not I at least got you out of the awaiting feedback jail.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for getting me out of the feedback jail. I appreciate your comments, but wondered what to do with the numbering sequence in light of what you said. How should I present numbers and do it naturally? I know, practice, practice, practice. And, you know what, I will. But technically speaking, was it loud enough or too loud? Just wondering.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello Crystal!

    I thought the volume was loud enough. Sounds fine to me...

    Peer Feedback:

    I went to audio engineering school, ages ago, when we still cut tape with a razor balde. One of my tasks was to edit an interview to take out extrainious pauses and "ummm"s and the like. But there were also spots where we were required to splice in a breath, because, my instructor told us, if a sentence went on too long with out a natural pause for a breath, the listener (possibly without even knowing it) would be holding their breath or somehow be tense.

    So, if Richurd is correct in assuming (as I do too) that you are recording a line at a time (or bits of lines) and patching it together, find a breath somewhere and patch that in as well. (Smoothly - some of your edits were a bit abrupt.) Doesn't have to be much, but it will somewhat eliviate Richurd's sense that you've rushed through the copy. I, for one, do not think that this is a terrible thing to do. (confession-I've done it) It's also an instructional piece, so you shouldn't feel constrained by a time limit. So, take your time.

    But it is a good personable read. You sound like you've picked a someone to talk to.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, James, for your input. Wow, an audio engineer from the "olde" days. This is what I really appreciate from Edge Studio--providing us a forum to work with so we can connect with others who have experiences in their history that can help the rest of us. I'll take all comments to heart and keep practicing (and listening to you all as well).

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    Sample -Medical Animation

    Script:

    When you apply a new patch, write down the date and time that the patch is applied, change the patch at the same time of day, one week, exactly 7 days, after you apply it. After removing and disposing of the patch, write down the time it was removed and how it was disposed. You may use the phone app to help keep track of application and removal information for your application sites, and see when you can apply the patch to a previously used site.

    Each patch is sealed in its own protective pouch. Do not apply a patch if the pouch seal is broken or if the patch is cut, damaged, or changed in any way.

    Prepare your application site
    Your patch should be applied to a hairless or nearly hairless skin site. If needed, you can clip the hair at the skin site. Do not shave the area or remove the hair in any way that may irritate the skin site. The skin site should be free of cuts and irritation (rashes, swelling, redness, or other skin problems).

    71 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Stefane's recording

    Hi, I'm new to VO and this is my first recording. I'm looking for feedback on both the read and technical. So much to learn! Thanks in advance.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-108095/script-recording-85405.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Stefane,
    Good first attempt. You have a nice voice. You didn't mention the purpose or audience or how it will be used, but I would guess it is part of a course or instruction of some kind. The pace seems okay, but it is quite mono-toned and a bit cyclical, and I think you need to work on speaking some more clearly. Some I noticed:
    - In the last sentence of the first paragraph, the word "application"
    - 2nd paragraph, "in it's own" and "changed"
    - 3rd paragraph "application", "your patch"
    You might try looking into some mouth and tongue loosening/warm up exercises before recording, and try speaking with heavy exaggeration on each syllable hear the difference, then record again reining the exaggeration back in to sound more natural. Hope this helps.

    Peer Feedback:

    Mostly agree with Jareth.

    This looks like an instructional video VO or a recording included with this particular patch product.

    So, as instructions (and to sync up with video or still pictures), the pace is just a little brisk and some of the words need a little more succinct enunciation (as mentioned by Jareth).

    The sound quality is generally pretty good. However there is a little white noise fuzz underlying the recording. The good thing is that it seems your recording environment relatively quiet and non-reflective. Don't know if you applied any processing FX or if this is just a raw recording. A noise reduction plugin might help take care of that fuzz problem.

    You might also experiment with mic placement and add a pop screen (if you haven't already) for the plosives - there's just a little popping here and there.

    Peer Feedback:

    I don't know much about the technical side, but I agree with Jareth and jamesromick when it comes to the performance aspects. One way bring a script alive, even though the content is as dry as all get out, is to act super passionate about it. Pretend you just LOVE explaining medical procedures. Find the most important bits of each sentence and emphasize them (e.g "apply", "new", "date", "time" in the first line). I am starting out myself and am working on these same things. :) I think you have tons of potential, keep at it!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you all for your input & encouragement. I needed to hear some unbiased opinions ;-) I appreciate your suggestions and will use them to keep working on it.

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    Script submitted by Tonia

    Script:

    Corneal Epithelium

    The corneal epithelium is a thin layer of fast-growing and easily regenerated tissue kept moist by tears. The epithelium absorbs oxygen and cell nutrients from tears, and then distributes these nutrients to the rest of the cornea. The part of the epithelium that serves as the foundation on which the epithelial cells anchor and organize themselves is called the basal membrane. The Bowman’s membrane is a transparent sheet of tissue composed of strong, layered protein fibers called collagen. The corneal stroma accounts for 90% of the cornea’s thickness, consisting primarily of water (78%) and collagen (16%). Collagen gives the cornea its strength, elasticity and form. The collagen’s unique shape, arrangement and spacing are essential in making the cornea transparent.

    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Tonia's recording

    Same first upload, but hopefully louder this time. Have at it. It's long, so feel free to crit with broad strokes. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-31886/script-recording-57069.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Great job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi! Tonia. You deserve kudos just for reading, what to my ears sounds pretty laborious script of medical terminology and you obviously have some acquired skill there. Great job for making it sound interesting. Best.

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice read - your voice is engaging and helps keep the content interesting.

    Peer Feedback:

    Terrific, Tonia!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the kind comments, everyone. I'm in the thick of figuring out new equipment and DAW, and it's amazing the time it takes. I have two young children and my husband's job is 100% travel, so my participation in the forum will probably be in fits and starts, but I appreciate the help and find it a great motivator to have others ready to catch my work on the other end!

    Back to top
    Script submitted by Tonia

    Script:

    Corneal Epithelium

    The corneal epithelium is a thin layer of fast-growing and easily regenerated tissue kept moist by tears. The epithelium absorbs oxygen and cell nutrients from tears, and then distributes these nutrients to the rest of the cornea. The part of the epithelium that serves as the foundation on which the epithelial cells anchor and organize themselves is called the basal membrane. The Bowman’s membrane is a transparent sheet of tissue composed of strong, layered protein fibers called collagen. The corneal stroma accounts for 90% of the cornea’s thickness, consisting primarily of water (78%) and collagen (16%). Collagen gives the cornea its strength, elasticity and form. The collagen’s unique shape, arrangement and spacing are essential in making the cornea transparent.

    18 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Tonia's recording

    Here's my first upload. I'm not sure if it will upload properly. I'm having some technical difficulties with file formats and my DAW.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-31886/script-recording-57055.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Argh. Short story--just ignore. It's too quiet and I'm having technical difficulties converting file formats. Hopefully will manage a louder version when the kiddos go to bed tonight.

    Peer Feedback:

    yeah...that's at -13.1db. Amplify or normalize it up to -3. I always try and record as close to -3 as possible and when working on the file, normalize it to 0db and do whatever I need to do...add the music tracks or sound f/x mix it till done and then pop it in the oven. I mean then mix it down to two tracks and then normalize to -3. The reason i do the mixing at 0db is so I can hear it all better and make sure nothing's clipping or distorting. Remastering the two-track (stereo) down to -3 brings it to the recommended level.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Tom. Huge help!

    Anyone know a good beginner book for the technicalities of recording VO? I comb the internet for decent content and find plenty, but so much of it is for those already experienced in recording music. I feel like I'm reinventing the wheel with this stuff. I don't know what I don't know. You know?

    Peer Feedback:

    Dan Friedman - his bio is in the instructors directory - has a book that might be helpful.

    Here's a link to his website.

    http://sound4vo.com/

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    See Your Chart

    Script:

    "SeeYourChart" is an easy to use and safe way to access important areas of your medical record. Available from any computer with an internet connection, you and those people you authorize, can access these areas from the main toolbar: a calendar with your upcoming appointments, a list of medications, demographics, labs, clinical summary and vital signs.

    Not only can you view the information online, you can also print out that information so it's available when you need it.

    50 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear psjones's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-91843/script-recording-86339.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Good tone! Very friendly. I especially like how your voice sounds on the downward inflections and 'ar' combos as is 'chart'...very warm! Great pacing too! A suggestion I have would probably be to offset the product name more...I wasn't sure at first listen that 'See Your Chart' was the product...it sounded as if you were telling me to see my chart...there is also a slight dialect on the phoneme [u] as in 'computer' and also on [oU] as in 'out'...may not be an issue...I was raised in Brooklyn, studied in Ohio, and live in the South...so I often catch a ton of little dialect issues that pop up making me not as 'generic' as I'd like to be. But again, may not be a real issue...

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    Sickle Cell Anemia

    Script:

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most commonly known genetic disease, it is also
    the first human disease whose molecular mechanisms were properly understood. It
    is disproportionately more prevalent among the black community, most notably in
    people of or recently descendant of equatorial Africa where the frequency of
    carriers of the trait can be as high as 40% of the population.

    Sickle cell anemia affects the way the body handles and responds to low levels of
    oxygen and for people with the full disease, the slightest of exertions can cause
    severe complications.

    35 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Kar9ai's recording

    I realise I need to work on my tones and emotion while speaking, I don't want to sound impersonal. So how does this sound? I'm aware that the sound quality could be improved but I'm trying to concentrate on voice performance right now.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-83693/script-recording-65348.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Kar9ai,

    First of all, let me say that I love the slight accent that you have! It's just enough to be noticeable, but not too much to be distracting…it's quite pleasing.

    I thought your pacing was good, and you handled some the more complicated words and word combinations quite well.

    While I do think that this read is a bit "impersonal", I don't know that a script of this kind really calls for a lot of emotion from the reader. If emotion and tone is something that you want to work on, try choosing some scripts that really call for those characteristics. This to me is more of a documentary/news story style, which typically doesn't require a high level of emotion.

    The only thing I personally would like to hear in this read is perhaps a bit more oomph or assertiveness in your delivery. There were a few times in the script where I felt as though you were on the verge of getting too soft, where your voice was almost ready to crack or get into "whisper mode". A little more push from your diaphragm should help that out a lot.

    Hope that helps!

    Sheats

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Sheats on this, the read maybe calls for an impersonal tone...but, that is an exercise in self direction. Ultimately it's what the client asks for. If they're paying for someone to sound happy about sickle cell anemia, bring out the sunshine!

    That being said, I also agree with the suggestion of a different script. Try some commercial scripts about food or something you're interested in. Otherwise, I think your unique accent is appealing enough for someone to cast you in plenty of narration projects.

    Nice job Kar9ai!

    David Michaelson

    Peer Feedback:

    Kar9ai,

    Great job with this technical copy. I agree with the above comments. This doesn't call for a personal interpretation. If anything, authoritative is what you're going for here. Keeping your voice up by using your diaphragm is key.

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    Umbilical Cord Blood

    Script:

    Phenotypic analysis shows that approximately 1% of cord blood mononuclear cells express high levels of CD34 antigen on their surface, but none of a panel of lineage antigens, suggesting that they are hematopoietic progenitor cells that have not yet committed to a specific lineage. Approximately 1% of CD34hi/Lin- cells are primitive hematopoietic progenitors that produce B lymphoid and multiple myeloid progeny for up to 7 weeks in stromal cell cultures. Twenty-one percent of CD34hi/Lin- cells also express low levels of the Thy-l antigen and are threefold to fourfold enriched over CD34hi/Lin- cells in primitive hematopoietic potential as measured by long-term culture and phenotypic analysis.

    73 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear coppertiara's recording

    I recorded this in my home studio (i.e. my closet). Your feedback on all aspects of this recording is appreciated. This is my first submission to this forum.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-129309/script-recording-96760.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Nicely done on the enunciation of the words. the one thing that stands out is all the popping sounds when saying your P`s. a pop screen would help a lot. other than that, nice job !

    Peer Feedback:

    Ken, thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I did have a pop filter in place, but your comment sent me googling for an education in how to place it properly. I think it was too close. I am just learning and I appreciate the feedback.

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    printer friendly version edit
    .Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Script:

    Although pathologic concepts regarding squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma have remained relatively stable during the past 10 years, those regarding the class of neuroendocrine tumors have continued to undergo revision and refinement. Neuroendocrine tumors are defined as those that produce biogenic amines. Pathologically, this can be demonstrated by a positive argyrophil or argentaffin stain, the presence of nerursecretory granules by electron microscopy

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 5 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    printer friendly version edit
    A Stitch in Time

    Script:

    A topical medical-grade cyanoacrylate adhesive is indicated as an alternative or adjunct to sutures. Contraindications include the ocular region, and oozing or possibly contaminated wounds.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 6 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    printer friendly version edit
    ADD

    Script:

    While there is currently no cure for ADD, treatment can usually help to manage symptoms. Treatment is geared toward helping those with ADD control their weak attention spans or high energy levels. This generally requires a combination of the following treatments: behavior modification and other psychological or psychiatric treatment, educational assistance, and medication. ADD is recognized as a disability under the Americans With Disabilities Act, so it is illegal to discriminate against a qualified applicant or employee because he or she suffers from ADD.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 16 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    printer friendly version edit
    Age Management Medical System - Cenegenics Script submitted by hunnoe1956

    Script:

    Aging is inevitable, but how you age is not. You have the power to take control and actually manage your aging process. A unique Cenegenics protocol is your gateway to next generation medical science . . . a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to age management that takes you well beyond the conventional approach of quick, routine exams and generalized guesstimates, based on body type, gender and age. In-depth diagnostics reveal your big picture, uncovering your strengths and weakest health links. With that medical data in hand, Cenegenics Affiliate NYC partners with you to create a personalized, multi-faceted program, which meets your health goals and successfully manages your aging process.
    Think of it as "squaring the curve," staying healthy and staving off decline, typically associated with getting older. The result? Youthful aging with a more vigorous, healthier lifestyle. Take charge & revitalize your aging process today ...

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    Alzheimer’s

    Script:

    This amazing network is maintained by carefully orchestrated chemical and electrical signals traveling through a system of nerve cells pathways. The symptoms of Alzheimer’s begin when this delicate signaling system is disrupted.

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    Atherosclerosis

    Script:

    High blood sugar, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure contribute to the formation of plaque on the inside walls of the blood vessels. This process, known as atherosclerosis, reduces the amount of blood that can pass through the blood vessels.

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    Atrial Fibrillation

    Script:

    The heart is a remarkable organ. It is a muscle that relaxes and contracts, pumping blood carrying oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The steady rhythm of these contractions is controlled by electrical impulses that travel through the heart, first through the upper chambers, called the atria; and then through the lower chambers, called the ventricles. In order to reach the ventricles, electrical impulses must pass here, at the atrioventricular node. Atrial fibrillation occurs when a storm of electrical impulses spread through the atria in a chaotic and disorganized pattern, causing the atria to begin rapidly contracting. as a result, the ventricles may also begin contracting faster. When the heart is in atrial fibrillation, the body can’t receive the blood and oxygen it needs.

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    Aventis

    Script:

    Director's Notes:

    We are launching a new interactive promotional campaign on our website. We are a pharmaceutical company that develops drugs for many serious and critical diseases.

    This campaign should not be salesy whatsoever. Cancer patients are strong and do not want to be pitied so please do not read this narration in a somber tone. Our outlook for the future is bright and promising and we would like this narration to reflect that.

    Please slate first name, last initial and the date.

    Script Title:

    Aventis

    Script:

    Millions of people are diagnosed with cancer every year. This disease hampers the prospects of many for a long and full life. At Aventis, we offer innovative drugs for the treatment of common cancers, such as breast or lung.

    To learn more about how we develop effective treatments for cancer, please click on the video link below.

    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Elton E. Jones's recording

    Hello Michael. Attached is this week's contest submission. I believe I'm ready to have my demo produced and would like for you to be my prep coach (you should be hearing from your office soon). I have been busy compiling scripts for the demo (13 commercial and 7 narration) and look forward to getting started to get your input. In addition to the guidelines from Edge to prepare for the demo, please let me know if there is anything else I should be doing between now and then. I've gotten very positive feedback from the other coaches on various reads and was very encouraged by your last review. I'm looking forward to your review of this one. Take care. Elton

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-[uid]/ecoaching-21820.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Elton, definitely sounds warm, but sounds just a tad mechanical in some points - on this type of read you want to go for warm and slightly comforting

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, pitts2k. You're right. I'm still working to smooth out the rough spots.

    E

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    Back to Life Journal

    Script:

    Sadly, too many times people with back and neck pain get a prescription of disability when they go to the doctor. "Don't play tennis. Don't play golf. Don't go fishing." While a day of rest may be okay right after an injury, the best therapy for back pain is movement. In fact, too much rest can make muscles and tendons less flexible - and more prone to future recurrent strain and back pain. Fact: You need a 20 minute walk to counter the effects of three hours of lying down. How would you know this? You'd learn that and more by reading our free 16-page Back to Life Journal. The Journal provides tips for those with back pain on how to get back to tennis, back to golf, or back to biking. Download your copy of the Back to Life Journal at NorthJerseySpineGroup.com.

    (script by jamesromick)

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    Blood Glucose Meter

    Script:

    If you have diabetes, it's very important to use a blood glucose meter.
    It helps you keep your blood sugar level within a healthy range.

    They don't all look like this one, but they all pretty much work the same way ...
    you provide a drop of blood, and the meter shows your glucose level.
    No need to freak out ... it's just a little pinch.
    Using the meter is really easy

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    Blood Glucose Meters

    Script:

    If you have diabetes, using a blood glucose meter is very important. It helps you keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. They don’t all look like this one, but they all pretty much work the same way. You provide a drop of blood, and the meter tells you what your glucose level is. Don’t get freaked out, it’s just a little pinch, and using the meter is really easy. The first thing to do is to load a test strip into the meter. That’s a little piece of paper that reacts with your blood.

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    Breast Cancer Research Foundation

    Script:

    Breast Cancer doesn’t just affect women. Consider the families and friends whose lives are also changed. In the U.S. alone over 215,000 women and 1,500 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and over 40,000 will die.
    We cannot rest until we win the battle against breast cancer. At the Breast Cancer Research Foundation a minimum of 85 cents of every dollar donated goes directly to cancer research and awareness programs. The Foundation has a 4 star rating, the highest possible, from Charity Navigator, and an “A” from the American Institute of Philanthropy.
    For more information, go to our website at www.bcrfcure.org or call toll free 866 Find-A-Cure..With your help we can erase this disease for good.
    The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Prevention and a Cure in our lifetime.

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    Cardiovascular Health

    Script:

    Many common health problems can put your cardiovascular system at risk. High blood pressure puts stress on the heart and other major organs. High cholesterol can clog important blood vessels. Uncontrollable diabetes affects how well your heart works and--like all of these conditions----can lead to heart attack, stroke, and severe kidney disease. That’s why it’s so important to keep these cardiovascular conditions controlled. Each one of them has a specific treatment goal, an actual number you should be trying to reach. Do you know yours? If not, talk to your doctor; find out what your goals are and what you can do to reach them. Because a healthy heart is within your grasp today.

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    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Jim Lankford's recording

    Steve: Attached is a short recording from my Home Studio. On this recording, there is NO processing, EQ or gates applied. The chain is simple; an AT4040 microphone plugged directly into a PreSonus Inspire 1394 A/D interface into a Dell PC and recorded with Cubase LE. I also have a dbx 286A mic pre / processor available to use, but have chosen not to utilize up to this point. How would you rate the overall sound quality? What can I do to improve it? Should I use the dbx mic pre or will it add unnecessary noise to the chain? What is the noise floor and is it acceptable? Are the accoustics okay? I'm basically in a small closet with a lot of sound absorption on the walls. When doing a “finished” product, what would you do to “sweeten” the sound (compression and how much, EQ, etc.)? I have a good quality mastering program (Ozone 3) to apply processing -- compression, EQ, expander, loudness, gate. Thanks, Jim Lankford jrlford@msn.com

    /sites/default/files/Jim Lankford_Home Studio Eval o.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The quality of your recording was really good. I don't hear any room effects. All vocals get some processing, so you'll probably hear your voice get punched up a little in a demo recording. But I'd say your setup is ready for prime time.

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    Choosing The Right Health Plan 2

    Script:

    The open enrollment period for your health-insurance plan comes once every year, usually during the fall. The corresponding paperwork typically generates as much enthusiasm as your yearly tax forms. But don't be tempted to just put a check mark next to your current plan. With so many insurers and employers raising health-insurance premiums and scaling back benefits, you need to know how your health plan stacks up against any others offered to you at work and whether it's the best choice for you.

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    Choosing The Right Surgeon

    Script:

    Choosing a cosmetic surgeon is much too important a decision to leave to chance. But with so many doctors vying for your attention, how do you choose? For 23 years, busy successful men and women – actors, models, sports personalities, and more recently, baby boomers – have turned for guidance to cosmetic surgery consultant, Denise Thomas.

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    Cipro Hc Otic

    Script:

    CIPRO HC OTIC (ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and hydrocortisone otic suspension) contains the synthetic broad spectrum antibacterial agent, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, combined with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid, hydrocortisone, in a preserved, nonsterile suspension for otic use. Each mL of COPRO HC OTIC contains ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (equivalent to 2 mg ciprofloxacin), 10 mg hydrocortisone (equivalent to 2 mg ciprofloxacin), 10 mg hydrocortisone, and 9 ml benzyl alcohol as a preservative. The inactive ingredients are a polyvinyl alcohol, sodium chloride, sodium acetate, glacial acetic acid, phospholipon 90HB (modified lecithin), polysorbate, and purified water. Sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acied may be added for adjustment of pH.

    Ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, is available as the monohydrochloride monohydrate salt of 1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1, 4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid. Its empirical formula is C17-h18-FN3-O3-HCl-H2O.

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    Corneal Epithelium

    Script:

    The corneal epithelium is a thin layer of fast-growing and easily regenerated tissue kept moist by tears. The epithelium absorbs oxygen and cell nutrients from tears, and then distributes these nutrients to the rest of the cornea. The part of the epithelium that serves as the foundation on which the epithelial cells anchor and organize themselves is called the basal membrane. The Bowman’s membrane is a transparent sheet of tissue composed of strong, layered protein fibers called collagen. The corneal stroma accounts for 90% of the cornea’s thickness, consisting primarily of water (78%) and collagen (16%). Collagen gives the cornea its strength, elasticity and form. The collagen’s unique shape, arrangement and spacing are essential in making the cornea transparent. The Descemet’s membrane is a thin, strong sheet of tissue that serves as a protective barrier against infection and injuries.

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    Corporate Product

    Script:

    At Bayer, a passion for science inspires us to address
    many of the health challenges in the world today.

    Here, at Bayer’s manufacturing site in Berkeley
    California, is where our commitment to the hemophilia
    A community begins.

    Hemophilia A is a deficiency in clotting factor eight – a
    condition that prevents the blood from properly clotting.

    The BHK cells were also modified by adding the gene
    for a 70-kilodalton human heat shock protein, referred
    to as HSP70.

    In addition to enhancing the host cell’s resistance to
    apoptosis, or programmed cell death, HSP70 also
    enhances proper protein folding of Kovaltry™.

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    Depression

    Script:

    Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine:

    Depression, also known as depressive disorders or unipolar depression, is a mental illness characterized by a profound and persistent feeling of sadness or despair and/or a loss of interest in things that were once pleasurable. Disturbance in sleep, appetite, and mental processes are a common accompaniment. Everyone experiences feelings of unhappiness and sadness occasionally. However, when these depressed feelings start to dominate everyday life without a recent loss or trauma and cause physical and mental deterioration, they become what is known as depression. Each year in the United States, depression affects an estimated 17 million people at an approximate annual direct and indirect cost of $53 billion. One in four women is likely to experience an episode of severe depression in her lifetime, with a 10-20% lifetime prevalence, compared to 5-10% for men. The average age a first depressive episode occurs is in the mid-20s, although the disorder strikes all age groups indiscriminately, from children to the elderly.

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    Disease

    Script:

    One of the biggest problems is drug resistance--the ability of infectious microorganisms to evade the drugs designed to stop them. These drug-resistant strains now include some pneumonias, tuberculosis, malaria, and AIDS. A second problem is the emergence of new infectious diseases. While AIDS and Lyme disease are obvious examples, more than 30 new disease-causing organisms have been discovered since 1976.

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    Drugs And Youth

    Script:

    Marijuana, the most popular drug of the 60s, is up to 20 times more powerful today than it was in the days of “flower power.” “Pot” was once thought to be a drug with few negative effects. Now there is concrete evidence that marijuana is harmful; it interferes with learning, and it impairs the healthy growth and development of children. This potent form of marijuana has 2-3 times the THC levels needed to cause severe psychological symptoms. Marijuana affects the brain, interfering with the ability to remember and think clearly, and to drive safely. It increases the heart rate and blood pressure, and causes damage to the lungs.

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    Ear Infections

    Script:

    You’ve seen your child’s symptoms. Crying all night. No appetite. Waking every hour or two, running a fever, tugging at little ears. Just when you thought you had it conquered for the season, your child’s ear infection is back. Bacteria are often the culprits. Fortunately antibiotics may help. But your role is also crucial. And the more you know about ear infections, the better prepared you are to fight them. Remember these tips. If you suspect your child has an ear infection, see your doctor. Don’t insist on a prescription for an antibiotic if your child has a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu. Tell your doctor if your child is taking other medications. Complete the prescription, even after your child starts to feel well.

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    Ear Video

    Script:

    Let's look at the parts of the ear. The flap on the outside of your head is called the outer ear. It leads to a long tunnel called the ear canal. At the end of the ear canal is a skin stretched across the tunnel—tight like a drum. This is called the eardrum.

    Let's see what happens to sound waves as they move through the ear. We'll use the sound from a radio as an example. The sounds from the radio travel in waves. The waves are collected by the outer ear and sent through the other parts of the ear to the brain. Now, let's see how each part works.

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    Exercise For Better Sex

    Script:

    We all know that exercise can tone our bodies, make them healthier and even more attractive. But did you know it can also improve your sex life? Start with a cardiovascular program to get your heart in shape. Next add pelvic exercises that will increase partner satisfaction.

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    Fibromyalgia

    Script:

    “Fibromyalgia syndrome, or F-M-S, is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people causing widespread pain in joints, tendons and muscles.”

    “Patients feel pain in as many as 18 specific “tender points,” small areas on the body less than an inch across. Even the slightest pressure on a tender point can cause excruciating pain.”

    “Sufferers may describe their pain as a deep persistent ache, stabbing or shooting muscular pain, or a burning sensation just beneath the skin.”

    “Other common symptoms include incapacitating fatigue, depression or anxiety, trouble sleeping, and problems with memory.”

    “To be diagnosed with FMS, the patient must have pain in at least 11 of the 18 tender points, and must have pain in all four quadrants of the body.”

    “Many researchers think the brain and spinal cord process pain messages incorrectly, causing FMS patients to feel pain more intensely.”

    “Physical or emotional trauma may trigger fibromyalgia. People involved in auto accidents, soldiers at war, or others in stressful situations sometimes develop FMS.”

    “Since there is no cure for fibromyalgia, treatment involves managing the symptoms with pain and antidepressant medications, and improving general health with proper exercise, adequate sleep, and a healthy diet.”

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    Functional Fitness

    Script:

    Welcome to our functional training series. Breaking it down, functional training is simply turning your attention to training the body for movements we perform as we go about our daily lives. Movements like standing , sitting, stepping, reaching, pushing, pulling, getting balanced. Our training series has broken down those movements into a series of workouts to help you draw attention to how you perform those activities on a daily basis. This is designed to bring your awareness to your posture and your form, to the muscle groups that allow you to work in those capacities and hopefully keep you safe and keep you strong.

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    Germs

    Script:

    A reassessment of diseases that might be infectious has been greatly facilitated by increasingly powerful tools of detection. Kaposi’s sarcoma, known for more than a century as a rare cancer that occurred in elderly men of Mediterranean extraction, was unmasked in the 1980s and 1990s, when a large number of KS cases arose in people whose immune systems were compromised by HIV. Statistical analysis led to the suspicion that the chain of infection was sexual. Over the past decade, scientists have accepted the infectious nature of about a dozen other diseases, including hepatitis C, nasopharyngeal cancer, Whipple’s disease, bacillary angiomatosis, Bell’s palsy, and the “aplastic crises” of sickle-cell anemia.

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    Glaucoma

    Script:

    Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve, which is the part of the eye that carries the images we see to the brain. The optic nerve is made up of many nerve fibers, like an electric cable containing numerous wires. When pressure inside the eye increases, damage to the optic nerve fibers may occur, causing blind spots to develop. These blind spots usually go undetected until the optic nerve is significantly damaged. If the entire nerve is destroyed, blindness results. Early detection and treatment by your ophthalmologist are the keys to preventing optic nerve damage and blindness from glaucoma.

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    Glucose Meter (VO for video)

    Script:

    If you have diabetes, it is very important to use a blood glucose meter.
    It helps you keep your blood sugar level within a healthy range
    They don't all look like this one, but tthey all pretty much work the same way...
    you provide a drop of blood, and the meter shows your glucose level.
    No need to freak out ... it's just a little pinch. Using the meter is really easy.

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    Heartsaver First Aid and Adult CPR Course

    Script:

    This American Heart Association course will teach first aid assessments and actions. Topics covered include: general principles of first aid, medical emergencies, injury emergencies, environmental emergencies and adult CPR. Blood borne pathogens will also be discussed as well as the chain of survival, activating the EMS system, systems of heart attack, diabetes, stroke and seizures. Class will consist of watch, then practice scenarios, with plenty of time for hands on learning.

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    HomeCall

    Script:

    Today in the United States, over 10 million people need help with their daily activities -- from simple eating or bathing, to round-the-clock nursing. 70% live at home -- and desperately want to remain there -- if help is available. HomeCall exists to enable them to remain at home ... in comfort ... with privacy and independence. Years ago, HomeCall recognized that all across the country there was a growing need for services that make it feasible for older persons to remain in their homes ... rather than make the heartbreaking move to an institution. So we supplied homemaking services such as meal preparation, light housekeeping, and personal care.

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    Hormone Action - Biochemical Aspects Of

    Script:

    Hormone trace substances produced by various endocrine glands, serve as chemical messengers carried by the blood to various target organs, where they regulate a variety of physiological and metabolic activities in vertebrates. Endocrinology, the study of hormones and their action, has long been an important field of vertebrate physiology, but apart from biochemical studies of the molecular structure of some of the hormones, until the late 1960s, little if anything was known of the biochemical mechanisms of hormone action. In the last few years, some important advances have been made in the molecular analysis of hormone function.

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    • TJS August 27, 2015
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    IHES and PD

    Script:

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) is one of a group of intrinsic pulmonary eosinophilic syndromes that are idiopathic in nature. Aggressive therapies can include busulfan, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin-A, etoposide, azathioprine, hydroxyurea, vincristine, or interferon alfa. Imatinib is used in myeloproliferative IHES.

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) often involves risk of pancreatic anastomotic leakage. To perform a safe and reliable pancreaticoenteric anastomosis with minimal leakage, most surgeons rely on binding pancreaticojejunostomy--also known as Whipple’s procedure.

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    Kissing and Colds

    Script:

    Go ahead and pucker up -- a smooch won’t transmit the sniffles, according to experts. Your mouth contains natural defenses such as antibodies and enzymes that make it hard for cold viruses to set up shop. Rhinovirus, the germ responsible for the majority of colds, prefers to hang out on your hands and in your nose, says Barry Stade, Ph.D., director of the department of clinical virology at Paterson University Medical Center. So unless you rub noses when you kiss or hold hands and then immediately wipe your nose, it’s safe to smooch when you’re sick.

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    Laser Skin Treatments

    Script:

    Lately, it seems that every time you walk into a dermatologist’s office, the doctor wants to whip out his latest toy--the laser. Broken blood vessels? No problem at all. let’s laser them. Scars? One single zap and they’re gone. Ditto for moles, wrinkles, excess hair, tattoos, stretch marks--you name it. But according to Dr. Roy Geronemus, director of the Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, “There’s a huge list of things that can be done with lasers, but they’re also being overused and abused, and some salons and even doctors are making claims that can’t be backed up yet.” In this video, we tell you the hype-free truth about the various top laser treatments--including when you might be better off with a low-tech alternative.

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    Light Chain Deposition Disease

    Script:

    Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is the deposition of monoclonal light chains in multiple organs. It is a rare disease characterized by deposition of nonamyloid immunoglobulin light chains, and they do not stain with Congo red and do not exhibit a fibrillar structure when examined ultrastructurally. It is categorized as a “monoclonal deposition disease” in the World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. LCDD was first described in 1976 in two patients with end-stage renal disease as granular deposits of free light chains in multiple organs, including the kidneys, that did not stain with Congo red.

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    Medicare Informational Video

    Script:

    Medicare Part B covers a wide range of outpatient and physician expenses regardless of where they are provided - at home, in a hospital, nursing home, or in a private office. Covered services include diagnostic tests, including X-rays and other laboratory services, as well as some Pap smear screenings.

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    Migraine Headaches

    Script:

    Today, thanks to new medical research, doctors have a better understanding of migraines. They know that a migraine is more than just a “bad headache.” It has a unique set of biological causes and physical symptoms. These symptoms include at least two of the following: pain on one side of the head, throbbing pain, pain that’s moderate to severe, pain that’s aggravated by activity. Migraine symptoms also include one of the following: sensitivity to light and/or sound, or nausea with or without vomiting. Doctors also have better insight into how much a migraine can affect you and everyone around you. Today doctors can diagnose migraines better; and they can provide treatment programs that are surprisingly effective.

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    Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathies

    Script:

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders in which mitochondrial dysfunction produces clinical disease. In the central and peripheral neuromuscular systems, they include such diverse disorders as Alper’s disease, a progressive cerebral poliodystrophy of infancy, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, a relatively benign disorder characterized by exercise-induced myoglobinuria. Mitochondrial myopathies are diseases in which the clinical presentation and course of illness are dominated by pathologic involvement of muscle.

    7 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott F.'s recording

    Thanks for your time and contribution... Also, I am always concerned about the tonal quality of my system. I currently use a AT 4060 tube mic, which goes to a dbx 286a. I do my recording via adobe audtion 1.5. Thanks for any input.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-555/Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathies_0.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    In medical reads, the technical terms are RARELY spelled out with syllables that don't matter. Your pronunciation of 'myoglobinuria' left out a syllable. Most of the read was quite good...but that was a word of medical importance which cannot be mispronounced.

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    Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathies

    Script:

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders in which mitochondrial dysfunction produces clinical disease. In the central and peripheral neuromuscular systems, they include such diverse disorders as Alper’s disease, a progressive cerebral poliodystrophy of infancy, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, a relatively benign disorder characterized by exercise-induced myoglobinuria. Mitochondrial myopathies are diseases in which the clinical presentation and course of illness are dominated by pathologic involvement of muscle.

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    Natural Remedies

    Script:

    Here’s the amazing truth: herbs, vitamins, and other natural remedies can cure you as well as--or even better than--potent drugs, and they are much safer. These marvelous natural remedies can lower your cholesterol, open up your arteries, regulate your heart, relieve depression, overcome anxiety, fight sleep problems, regenerate your liver, restore your memory, heal arthritis, cure hay fever, shrink varicose veins, and treat the flu as well as dozens of other diseases.

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    Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Script:

    Although pathologic concepts regarding squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma have remained relatively stable during the past 10 years, those regarding the class of neuroendocrine tumors have continued to undergo revision and refinement. Neuroendocrine tumors are defined as those that produce biogenic amines. Pathologically, this can be demonstrated by the presence of neurosecretory granules by electron microscopy.

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    Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Script:

    Although pathologic concepts regarding squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma have remained relatively stable during the past 10 years, those regarding the class of neuroendocrine tumors have continued to undergo revision and refinement. Neuroendocrine tumors are defined as those that produce biogenic amines. Pathologically, this can be demonstrated by a positive argyrophil or argentaffin stain, the presence of nerursecretory granules by electron microscopy.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 2 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Nightmare-asthma

    Script:

    For a kid with asthma, the joys of childhood quickly become living nightmares. A playful kitten, a cuddly puppy, a bouquet of flowers, all are potential triggers for terrifying attacks. Don’t let Asthma rob another childhood. Call 1800 Lung, USA. The American Lung Association.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 3 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Nu-Vile

    Script:

    We all worry. Funny how the more secure we get, the more we seem to have at stake. Getting older used to be about getting closer. Closer to freedom. Closer to goals. Closer to life. Now … it's different. Now, we want it back.
    That's where Nu-vile comes in. Nu-vile provides tailor-made transfusions of rich, rejuvenating blood, drawn from only the healthiest babies on the market. Nu-Vile. Get closer to life again.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on a recording of this script that one of your peers recorded.

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    Osteoporosis

    Script:

    Calcium has long been known to help prevent osteoporosis, the brittle-bone disease that afflicts many older Americans, especially women. Calcium is particularly helpful in girls and women under 30, whose bones are still forming, and in post-menopausal women, who tend to lose calcium from their bones. In one study, children who took a 700-mg. calcium supplement in addition to a calcium-rich diet had denser bones than those who ate the diet alone. Calcium supplements have also been found to reduce bone loss in post-menopausal women, especially those who get less than 400 mg. of calcium a day from food, reports Beth Dawson-Hughes, M.D., a calcium/osteoporosis researcher at Tufts University.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on a recording of this script that one of your peers recorded.

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    Pituitary Tumors

    Script:

    The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. A tumor of the anterior pituitary can cause excess growth hormone production, leading to gigantism or acromegaly. Too much thyroid-stimulating hormone can lead to hyperthyroidism, and excess adrenocorticotropic hormone can cause Cushings Syndrome. Finally, an increased production of prolactin can cause galactorrhea, absence of menstrual periods, and infertility in women. In men, increased production can cause impotence, infertility, feminization, and galactorrhea.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 3 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    25 people have played this

    Demo Recording:

    Click to hear Art656's recording

    I'm taking another stab at this. My delivery is a little more focused than it was the first time I did this one. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-53734/script-recording-55746.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    It's clear, well-enunciated, well-pronounced. Since it's medical, and therefore serious, you have the gravitas down... but...I think I would just want a tiny bit of warmth. Just a bit. If you are talking to me, I just want to feel you are...more human. Make sense? This is just picking...because it's a very good read.

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow. You sounded exactly like narrations to film strips I watched when I was in school. Did I give away my age by saying when I was in school, the medium was film strips? I agree with sarahsally on adding a smidge of warmth. Before I even saw her comment, I was thinking the same thing myself. It was, I guess I would call it 'clinical' and very serious. Just my two cents but if this was for med students to listen to, it was perfect. If it was for just 'regular people' to listen to, I'd want it to sound a little more empathetic...like you are more a regular person than a med student. It sounded completely professional, to me.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you ladies! I appreciate the input!

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    20 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lombardgeezer's recording

    Looked for the most boring script to see if I can bring it to life for doctors or medical students

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7094/script-recording-24044.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This was a warm, sincere read. I could believe the speaker cared and new what she was talking about. Excellent handling of medical terms. A couple of mouth clicks here and there, but over all very good.

    I can't comment on the recording quality with any expertise, but I couldn't hear anything offensive.

    Great job!
    Jan

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    10 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Lukky Salas's recording

    I'm trying again. Tell me if I can be heard this time! (I need advice on sound quality, etc and will get some soon.) Please tell me about the performance - clear? understandable? fast/slow? Thanks, Lukky

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/3-CORNEAL EPITHELIUM.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Lukky - as far as the sound goes, I'm hearing you a bit better, but there's quite a bit of background static still. I don't know whether that's a mic issue or an issue with the room you're in, but it's not the sound quality that I'm sure you're aiming for. As for performance, I think your pace might have been a bit fast, but more than that, it seemed disconnected. While you were articulate and sounded intelligent, I didn't feel that you were talking to me and trying to teach me something. If you could find a balance between conversational and educational, I think it would sound great. Best of luck. Marianne

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    11 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear phillipq45's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10286/script-recording-55288.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Well, it's a brave effort for it being your first ever recording. The wrong: a lot of hiss, errors left in the read, a regional sound (not terrible, but present) and a good bit of under-enunciation. A general sense of boredom in the delivery.

    The better: cajones on trying something this long for a first recording. Nice resonant voice. Good general pronunciations (different from enunciation).

    You'll want to improve articulation a bit and connect better with the script.

    Welcome to the forum!

    Peer Feedback:

    phillipq45 --
    Nice pipes. I like the baritone range. the inflection was pretty monotone, but that could be ok for a narration of a educational briefing, or something --
    If this was supposed to be a discovery channel TV show, then it's way too flat.

    But, man, you are seriously just reading. Like a book report in front of the class. Albeit with a nice voice.

    You sound really tight, like you're a little nervous at the mic,
    or you've gotta swallow, but you can't now, because you have to read....

    As TxTom says, "welcome to the forum!"

    cheers,
    DS

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    Apoplastic Cellular Transport

    Script:

    Connecting the cytoplasm of adjoining cells is the plasmodesmata. It creates a continuous pathway called the symplast that allows for the movement of molecules between cells.
    The apoplast, cell walls and extracellular spaces, is also a location for water and mineral movement.
    Inside the cell wall of every endodermal cell is a belt of waxy material called the Casparian strip. This blocks the movement of water and dissolved minerals. Water and minerals must move through the plasma membrane and then into the xylem (they cannot be transported via the apoplastic route).

    89 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear TedVoInSpain's recording

    I had the opportunity to do a bit of bio medical stuff the other day. It's lots of fun. This request was for a totally dry audio which they will later process into training segments.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8990/script-recording-84307.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance was very clear , dictation was awesome , could pace a little on some specific parts. But over all It was very good. Great Job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey! Thanks Rey, It was sitting in the no mans land so long I was afraid it sucked. :) This was an odd bit I did, it was or is going into Indian Public High Schools. The visuals are pretty good but I was on a bit of a time crunch in some parts, but that was because of the speed of the visuals.
    Note that in that text, I see 9 words that I'd previously never said aloud. The project spanned about 10 pages and I'd say 20% of the time I spent on the whole job was researching pronunciation, but also listening on how it is used in a sentence.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ted,

    Jumping back into the Forum pool?

    Nitpicking: Only comment I would make is to slow the pace just a touch. If you're dealing with medical term mouthful - especially for Indian Public High Schools (I'm assuming in India) where English man not be their primary language, at least not spoken in the home - you might want to "lay it out" just a touch more.

    Peer Feedback:

    Great job Ted. The diction was spot on. I like that you took your time through some of the tongue twisters instead of rushing like some others on this site. Pleasant and informative is just what the Doctor ordered ; )

    Peer Feedback:

    If there is one nit to pick...pace. Otherwise, sound quality is excellent, the diction was right on, attitude just right. James is apparently hearing the same thing I am...just a tad fast..IMO, even if your audience is nothing but doctors. Nice to see you post something, Ted!

    Peer Feedback:

    HEY Guys - Waving at James and Jerry! Well, not BACK in...I pop in from time to time when I have something decent to share. Just recently I sent a couple of hopefuls this way. Hopefully they will see me posting here and not be so timid.
    Oh hey on another note, don't know if you remember Scott Mcdonald? We've kept in touch and the other day he contacted me for a job he couldn't do and I got it :)
    So to anyone who's reading...This forum is such a great place, I myself started here. But it's just to get you to the first step of the industry. Make all your mistakes here, but more importantly, get an idea about what sounds right for you.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Ted!

    Your gear sounds great! Pacing is fast for a learning tool. A bit hard too on consonants. Articulation is amazing otherwise! Great work bud~!

    Peer Feedback:

    Ted -
    long time, no hear.

    I like the friendly tone in this otherwise very technical read, which can be prone to sounding dry. 'Friendly' seems more inviting to listen to the details.

    I agree with the pace (a little fast) - maybe more about "patience" (not patients...lol) with the phrasing. I think a patient delivery conveys more authority or something.

    Nice job. I look forward to more. And yes, this forum is just about the best free VO resource around.

    cheers,
    DS.

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    8 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Dewayne Hickman's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-583/Medical Narration.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Great job with this - the only thing I can point out (and it is hard to do) is that it sounded like you had a bit of a lisp when reading some of the words. Also, at the beginning you had an almost bored tone to your voice. I am not expert though - great job!

    Peer Feedback:

    If someone sounded bored and had a lisp, then I do not think it would be considered a great job. I do not know what you mean by sounded bored, but a medical narration is not supposed to be happy go lucky sounding. Also, a lisp? Could you be confusing sibilance with a lisp? I assure you I do not have a lisp. Please point these things out to me as I love criticism and learing from it. Frankly though, I just do not see it as you do. Maybe with your help I can. Am I just seeing things the way I want to? I look forward to hearing from you and recieving more criticism from you and other people on this site. Have a great day.

    Peer Feedback:

    OK, there is a little sibilance, not anything that creates a problem. Everybody has some.

    The tone however sounded to me like the bass was over boosted, actually more like a low pass filter took out everything above maybe 6k. It made it a little muddy I thought. I am assuming it is not over processing with a De-esser, as I don't think sibilance is that big a problem for you.

    It almost sounded like a flanger affect when you said "atherosclerosis, reduces the amount of blood". Listen to just those words, they have a little halo of a squeak surrounding each word. This definitely wasn't your voice, but some processing that was done I believe.

    As for your read, it was good technically. Very clear, good enunciation. Just what this script calls for. Perhaps a couple of the pauses (really the first one between "pressure," and "High") were a little too long I thought and that made the pace seem slow.

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    3 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lindavw's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-333/artherosclerosis.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You have an ideal voice for this medical stuff, and you can handle the medical terms. Kudos to you!! I feel the way you read the first three things (list) sounded strange to me. I think it may be because you emphasize the second "blood". it would make sense to do this if all three items had "blood" in them but they do not. Also the the first "blood" in the last sentence was hit a little too hard for me. I hope my points came across clearly. Remember, just my humble opinion!!

    Peer Feedback:

    I thought you gave a good, clear reading. I thought your emphasis was good: it made sense to me. I haven't listened to many of the technical recordings, but I thought your read was a little too dry. Also, as you probably are aware, there is a lot of noisy hum in the recording!

    Peer Feedback:

    Technically, not bad--matter-of-fact and straightforward, if a little dry. I've found that often with medical, technical, and scientific reads, the more abstruse and jargon-laden they are, the more likely the client is to want a "conversational" read. Ironic, no? So the challenge is to humanize something inherently abstract and arcane. This applies to both you and the fellow above you: Dewayne. This doesn't mean "happy-go-lucky", but it does mean you should warm it up a bit--less sense of lecturing or reading aloud from a medical text, and more sense of a friendly medical professional explaining something over coffee to a patient's family member. Watch pronunciation of "atherosclerosis". You differentiated the items in the opening list well, but conceptual clarity would be added by a slight emphasis on blood PRESSURE as distinct from blood SUGAR. The point of the last line isn't that atherosclerosis reduces the amount of BLOOD that can pass through the blood vessels (your emphasis), but rather the AMOUNT of blood that can pass THROUGH the blood vessels. (Please don't let the fact that the only way to indicate emphasis in these critiques is by using capital letters lead you to believe I'm advocating OVER-emphasis--just a different emphasis.)

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    89 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Dianne Cotten's recording

    This is my first submission for feedback. I'm just getting started and still need to get more range in demos. I'm open to all critiques. Thank you for listening!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-83765/script-recording-83316.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    the three things that are listed., HBS,HC,and HBP does not blend well with the rest of the copy....The read had a great tone and your voice had great clarity and for the quality of recording was very nice!!

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your delivery. You had a great tone and pace through out the recording! How you say "vessels" stands out though. Overall good recording though.

    Peer Feedback:

    eglover177, Thank you for commenting. I'm not sure how the "list" does not blend well, would you mind elaborating?

    Bullardben1, I am assuming it is the last "vessels" that stand out. I guess that's what I get for recording at 2 in the morning. The Perfection filter was turned off. Best to make those mistakes on samples and not the real deal. Thank you for commenting.

    Overall, I am very happy the recording quality is good. I'm just getting back into the business and on a bare bones budget, recording with Blue Yeti USB mic and audacity in a walk in closet. Thank you Edge Studio for such a tremendous amount of helpful information!

    Peer Feedback:

    There is quite a bit of breath noise, sometimes in the middle of a sentence, which makes the read a bit choppy.

    There is also quite a bit of sibilant sizzle on nearly all of the S's on and after the word "walls", not uncommon in women's voices. A little fiddling with the EQ would knock down some of those frequencies and not have them be so sharp sounding. There are also some very good (free) de-esser plugins that are pretty effective.

    Peer Feedback:

    James touched on the performance notes (breathing etc) which I agree with. However, there is nothing wrong with the list of symptoms or causation "mixing with the rest."

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you James and TxTom. I will work with the EQ settings, as well as practice, practice, practice on naturally eliminating the breath sounds and other mouth noises. I appreciate all of the comments. Blessings!

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    115 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear DonnaCookVO's recording

    Want to confirm that can be heard through both earphones and speaking at a good rate. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-123263/script-recording-95168.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Yes, it can be heard through both earphones and speaking rate is good. Sounds like you ran out if breath at "through the blood vessels." The emphasis on the word reduces is probably not necessary in a medical narration, but it may help to re-engage the listener.

    Peer Feedback:

    The words "and high blood pressure" were punched harder than high blood sugar and high cholesterol. Don't think that was necessary as high blood sugar and high cholesterol are equally as important, in my opinion.

    Agree with the previous comment that punching the word "reduces" wasn't necessary.

    I was able to hear the recording through both earphones.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with previous feedback and want to add that I felt like you were saying
    Hi! to the blood sugar and cholesterol instead of meaning that these are "High" issues. If you can get what I mean!
    I can hear through both headphones. Lose that emphasis on "reduces".

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with the others. the punches you gave were not necessary. good quality.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good read, be careful where you punch up words that they make sense in normal conversation, some of these were not really necessary.

    Peer Feedback:

    You are very animated and it's a little choppy. Maybe smooth it out a little. You have a lovely voice!

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    63 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear donnie0darko0's recording

    setting up home studio, seeing how it sounds

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-102833/script-recording-83124.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The recording sounds very informative and I applaud you on pronouncing "atherosclerosis" without a hitch. I know that medical terminology is definitely not my area. The recording quality sounds fine; do you have a pop shield?

    Peer Feedback:

    Volume was too low, there was a good amount of mouth noise and I think I heard a click at the end, but I am listening through my speakers, not headphones. I thought it might be a little hollow sounding too, but that's iffy with the speakers, but just so you know. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice pronunciation. I agree with another reviewer...the sound quality needs to improve. I listened through my computer only and found it hard to hear you, and you sounded like you might be 5 ft away from the microphone. I hope this helps adjust your microphone/sound system.

    Peer Feedback:

    There is a bit of "noise" underlying the recording - that static fuzz sound as opposed to an electronic buzz. Your recording environment may not be "dead" enough - more sound deadening treatment may be in order. Some of that could be taken care of with a noise reduction plugin and/or high-pass filter applied.

    There is also some reflection - not reverb - which indicates that there are some hard surfaces that may need padding with sound deadening material.

    The initial recording volume is low and you may be a little to distant from the mic. Start at the "hang five" distance and move toward or away to find your "sweet spot".

    You might also fiddle around with some EQ frequencies. There is a lack of crispness - kind of sounds like you're talking into a tube.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you everyone for your feedback, it's invaluable! I will be re-configuring and re-recording.

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    88 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear donnie0darko0's recording

    I've tweaked my setup a bit- re-situated the foam backing I have behind the microphone, moved my position somewhat and changed the blankets I was using for sound dampening. I also ran it through 1 pass of "noise removal" on audacity. Let me know if there's an improvement!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-102833/script-recording-83238.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    how far away are you from the mic? Sounds a bit hollow. nice read though

    Peer Feedback:

    donnie --
    can you liven the delivery up a little? I realize it's a dry subject, but anything you can add to it would help a lot.
    did you pronounce atherosclerosis correctly? it sounded like you said "ath-er-ah-sclerosis"...should it be "ath-er-oe-sclerosis"?

    regards,
    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    @redfrohock should i move closer or further away to help alleviate the hollow-ness?

    @DS Thanks, but I'm not actually looking for feedback on delivery, I'm looking for feedback on the recording quality, trying to tweak it and get it right with what I have.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ah. I didn't read your comment closely enough last time...
    I think your recording sounds a little hollow. I think there's still some room noise. having foam in front of the mic is usually much less effective than having sound baffling behind you and above you. that's where reflected sound will come from that gets back into the mic.

    cheers,
    DS.

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    5 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear smountjoy's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-1227/script-recording-10269.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This type of voice work is not my strong suit, but although this is the first of your work I've heard, I would say it is definitely yours. You sound like an authority on the matter and your pacing is quite good here. If I had to nit pick anything I'd say you didn't need to emphasize the word "through" in the last sentence.

    Great work!

    -- Kevin

    Peer Feedback:

    A really nice read, with one exception: the word "atherosclerosis". You seem to pronounce it "ARTHROsclerosis". It should be "ATH-ER-Osclerosis".

    Liked the read, though.

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    120 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear boxermom2000's recording

    Just tried EQ using Audacity, to boost the bass. Would love any and all feedback! ~Laura

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-87511/script-recording-75647.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi! Laura. You had me on the first line! "The heart is a remarkable organ". There was some mouth noise but I thought you did an excellent job, particularly on those hard to pronounce terms. Best,

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello Laura,
    Very well read. Your voice is well suited to this kind of script.

    Peer Feedback:

    Very well done ! I really like your voice for this type of script. Overall I thought the recording quality was pretty darn good . You missed the word " and " between chaotic and disorganized. but that's a very minor nit picky thing :) and maybe the last sentence
    could have used a little something ...maybe a little up swoop on the word " needs " at the end ? I'm still a rookie so I would defer to the more experienced ears on what they think. :)

    Again though, tough script and a great job !

    Peer Feedback:

    I totally agree with you terry66, and might add that a few of the sentences were a little up at the end in the beginning, but that's so minor. Very nicely done!

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice. A lot of difficult copy to nail. Some plosives popped. You'd be great at e-learning.

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    20 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear dreamerbird's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-93954/script-recording-73911.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    In the area of recording quality I heard some echo. You'll want to make sure that goes away by recording in a room with soft surfaces. If a room like that isn't available get as close to the mic as you can, possibly sitting in a corner. Your voice sounds clear but your delivery is a little slow and it sounds like you take a breath after every one or two words. Not only does that chop up the sentences and interrupt the flow of your speech but it can also make it easier to get light-headed by the end of your read. Think in terms of saying your script instead of reading it.

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    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Mike Forbes's recording

    Love to hear some constructive feedback. Thanks so much!!!!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-344/script-recording-48118.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Mike you obviously have an excellent command and knowledge of medical terminology which made it interesting. I just thought your reading was overly dramatic in some places. The challenge here is to be informative without being too expressive. Best.

    Peer Feedback:

    Mike, Awesome job! I think all you need to do is mix the levels of your voice and music a little better as your voice seemed to be too present. You'll also want to tame the reflections in your recording environment. And some pauses were too short and made the recording sound a little bunched up. But all of this can be fixed without the need to re re-record. Your tone and tempo were terrific.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you Javier and Arlen...

    Points well taken! I appreciate your taking the time.

    Best of luck.

    Mike

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Mike, nice read. I agree with Javier that your voice was too loud and the music too low. Also as Arlen mentioned, you're too excited with some words.

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    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear DebInCT's recording

    Newbie here so any comments and suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-67786/script-recording-59701.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm glad to read that you took my first critique to heart. I don't know if you recorded this one after reading that critique, but based on listening to this one, I will give you one of the most often expressed suggestions of forum posters after they've gotten some experience and coaching: imagine you're speaking to your husband/best friend/significant other. What someone means when they might say "I'm being read to" is that a "conversational feel" is missing.

    Listen to your two posts from this evening and imagine it was your best friend delivering that to YOU. Does it sound like someone simply speaking to you? Or does it sound like someone reading off a screen or page to you?

    A good suggestion I might offer is to have a friend or partner/spouse listen to your posts. See if THEY think you're speaking to them casually....or do THEY feel like you're reading.

    Good luck. Good first posts.

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    14 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear eppervesce's recording

    Tell me what you hear. I am taking the Home Studio class later this week and hope to find out how to augment recording quality. Thanks in advance

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-28067/script-recording-60102.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi There.

    I like your timing, inflection and clarity.

    What I think I hear (as I am still learning myself) is a high, thin quality and the breathing between phrases - kind of shrill sound.

    What is your recording software? I have been using Audacity and have a learned a little about normalizing, noise removal, high and low shelf filter and a little equalizing.

    You will pick up a lot in your course I'm sure. Keep at it!

    Mellonee

    Peer Feedback:

    I had just listened to your Thomas Jefferson track before this. This one worked much better for me. You seemed to have a much better command of the script's intent on this one. The phasing did seem more apparent on this track. If you are using open type headphones, you may want to turn them down and be sure not to turn your head to the side at all...or maybe just get some closed ear phones.

    Peer Feedback:

    I appreciate the suggestions, thank you. Home Studio is tomorrow. I do use Audacity but don't know how to adjust anything. I'll be asking lots of questions.

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    22 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear swiftyfish's recording

    Constructive criticism please on clarity and peerformance. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-57343/script-recording-56971.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    First sentence - "...it's very important to use..." got slurred to "iz very imporn-new-use". And "really" in the last sentence sounded like "rilly".

    A lot of "ya" for "you". If you were going for a Wilford Brimley type of read, you have to commit to it.

    Peer Feedback:

    I wonder how much of what you hear is clarity in the recording. Please address that for me. I have a nephew who works for MTV and a brother who is a a memebr of the actors guild and the variety actors guild. Although they are probably biased related to my being family they have not commented the same way. Both have extensive voice coach, and recording training.

    When I sent the sound bytes over they weren't picking these things up. I asked them to be critical of these recordings. Listening to myself is a very difficult because it's like reviewing a typed paper where you miss your errors, even after 3 attempts to correct them, so I appreciate your input. Any input you have on my review and articulation of recordings will be helpful for sure. You probably are accomplished in tuning into these errors as you sound like your active in the voice over experience so thank you for the read!

    The comment about what to expect in an audition was great, and again thank you!

    Peer Feedback:

    Agree with James on the diction. One thing to consider when asking family to critique your stuff (other than the idea that they might not want to say anything discouraging) is that they may have the same speech patterns as you! Something to consider.

    Like James said, it could lend to a character type of read, but if that is the case, deliver it throughout. But that's your regular speech tendencies, it might be a hard habit to break. I, for one, have a hard time not saying 'ya'll' to northerners.

    Peer Feedback:

    I could tell that you were going for a relaxed and easy read and talking to someone who was perhaps new to diabetes and its regimen. I also noticed slurs in the places that were mentioned in previous comments and I heard a couple of very slight mic pops. I don't think you were too close to the mic all the time; they happened toward the middle of the read.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Chris!

    I look forward to further feedback from you. Do you have any suggestions on modification of delivery that could inhance the easy read? Possibly exciting the listener without being over the top. I need to avoid treating the listener as a patient.

    Thank you James!

    I did listen to Wilford Brimley voice samples today and was able to identify your point. Appreciate the read! I also listened carefully and found the slurring and poor annunciation but had to listen several times carefully. Very hard for me to pick up on. Possibly with more practice I will find these issues more easily and correct them as I speak.

    Thanks Tom!

    I may have a north eastern accented speech habit I need to be careful of for sure. You are right on target with the voice similarities in the family. Appreciate the feedback bigtime.

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    4 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Greg's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-797/script-recording-12482.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Fantastic. This sounded effortless. Such dry copy, but you add enough warmth and wisdom to keep the interest up. Your voice and delivery suite this perfectly in my opinion.

    I did notice the slightest "hum" come in on the 2nd to last sentence and stay to the end whenever you spoke. Again, very slight, but thought I should bring it up in case it's a connection issue. (I listened 3 times to be sure, there is a faint "hum" there)

    Best of luck to you! You're a real talent.

    BB

    Peer Feedback:

    Greg. This was a fantastic effort given the tedious subject matter. I bet you are as irritated as I was listening back to those nasty mouth clicks. Perhaps a glass of water before your reading would have helped but other than that I really enjoyed listening to your voice. Well done.

    Peer Feedback:

    Best cure for the mouth clicks is to eat/suck on Granny Smith Green Apple slices.

    No, seriously- it works like a charm. But ONLY Granny Smiths.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the comments. I truly appreciate them all. Mouth clicks are a chronic problem for me. A year ago at this time I was undergoing cancer treatments which included 7 weeks of radiation (5 days per week) around my neck. The extensive radiation killed my saliva glands. Believe me, I have tried everything I and others could think of, including Granny Smith apples, water, mouth sprays, olive oil, Grether's Pastilles...best I can do is attempt to edit out the clicks as much as possible. If only those listening to my real auditions would do so through cheap PC speakers the clicks wouldn't be so apparent :o)

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    17 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Ian Miller's recording

    Here's a medical read...I believe I have got the pronunciation right...

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-14151/script-recording-36571.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance - you nailed that read. Are you used to reading this type of material or are you a doctor. Your comfort level in this read and the Voice Actors Voice is really noticeable. This read is much better, smoother and more confident. Very good.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Sabrina...no medico here...there's something satisfying about getting the old chops around difficult words and phrases... Ian

    Peer Feedback:

    Well you "go" Ian and get your chops around those difficult words and phrases...you did good.

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    10 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Larry Terp's recording

    First Medical Script Practice. Some breathing couldn't eliminate. Comments welcome.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3804/script-recording-26653.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This script is a nightmare of tongue twisters and places where you could get tongue tied. You read it so clinically, precisely and with the proper pacing in my opinion. The tone of voice was appropriate to the subject matter and this would be perfect to present to Doctors! Ahhh, except for 2 little things.

    Since I'm no doctor, everything that A. could possibly be mispronounced, B. have more than one pronunciation or C. is a word that I have never spoken aloud before in my life, I look up. I look up to see (a) what is the correct pronunciation, and if there are any acceptable alternate pronunciations. I go to dictionaries and websites (as I did in this case) because in these cases, pronunciation must be correct. First one is the word "...basal membrane..." You say Basil like the spice and it's more like Basil in Basil Rathbone. If this were the real thing, at this point I'd pick up a phone and call a dermatologist. I may be wrong... However not on the next one.
    "Descemet’s membrane" looks like a good read, but... rule number 1 applies and in this case... It's pronounced - des a mays not des a mets. Think french on the pronunciation.

    You can change those 2 sentences in minutes in your studio. The key is knowing without a doubt how it's pronounced and even if you THINK you know, and in my case I refer to rule number one above, double check it. 80% of the general public wouldn't catch those 2 mispronunciations... but 100% of your target audience would. Heck, the guys in the studio might not even pick this up, but the person looking for this script would. So even though it is a near perfect read, and it is really good (you should add reading this kind of material to the stuff you read well) this could be rejected if you sent it like this.

    If I didn't enjoy your stuff so much, I'd never spend time examining it. Very well done, very professional. Nodo420
    Pronounciation references:
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/descemet's%20membrane
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/basilar

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Nodo: Thanks for the fine feedback. Point taken. I'm not a doctor or pharmacist and had a nagging feeling some of the pronunciations could have been off. I should have checked first. Larry

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    10 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear midnightninja5's recording

    So I'm just beginning this and I don't yet have the proper software or microphone, but I don't want this to stop me from getting started. Please be harsh. I'm one of those people that thrives on constructive criticism.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6116/script-recording-21571.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your voice...very friendly. The read was good as far as word formation; but could be a little smoother from word to word and phrase to phrase. There were some mouth-sounds audible ; but that could be mic technique or dry mouth due to nerves.. Nice job, overall.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good first effort! I agree with RansomPlace...you might concentrate on a more even delivery. These medical scripts are difficult because the content is so dry. Most clients want conversational and relaxed reads...but I think that this type of job is the exception. I would love to hear you do something a little more fun ...relaxed. Keep up the good work!

    Peer Feedback:

    Good job on a tough script. As noted before a bit choppy. You may want to back off the mic just a bit to avoid the mouth noises. A pop filter would help as well.

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    40 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear 's recording

    Trying to smooth out my delivery, keep it warm and informative. Thanks for any feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3974/script-recording-32796.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice, veeery nice! Your voice is so calming! Wow

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Bill,

    Great delivery! Could easily hear this for a tv spot. You had a nice relaxed tone, kept it informative and the music bed was perfect. Good job!

    Lenny (LCW)

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice job there, Bill. Consistently good.

    Peer Feedback:

    Delivery is good, music apropos, nice flow, good all around!

    Keep pushing ever onward!

    Wolf

    Peer Feedback:

    Yep. What everybody else said. Very good job of one-on-one communication.

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked this a lot. I thought the tempo was perfect. I listened to it with my eyes closed and was able to absorb and follow you effortlessly. You sound informative and engaging thereby keeping the listener's interest. The tone was very nice and you weren't overly pitchy. Really nice job!

    Alex

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Bill, to me this was almost perfect. I think I would only change the way you said "functional training series.' "Series" sounded a little too announced." Everything else sounds great as usual. Excellent job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Javier,
    Honestly, I wasn't quite sure how to say the phrase, "Functional Training Series" All three words are important but, I think, the first two modify the third one in this phrase. So, does Series get the most emphasis? Anyway, I hear what you're saying and appreciate your feedback.

    Peer Feedback:

    Super recording, the one thing i noticed is that the music bed at the begging starts on a level then drops a bit as you start your performance then goes up again for a moment.Overall a pleasure to listen to you.

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice overall delivery, good choice of music.

    Really like your voice for voice-over.

    Was this for an e-learning series or ? You were very consistent on keeping your range compressed. Especially like the list starting with, standing, sitting, stepping, etc.

    The only part for me that could be improved was the last long sentence, which seemed a little stiffer that the rest.

    Overall it was very nice.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback, Balazs and Scott. Yup, this is a narration script in the medical genre, so not commercial at all. I agree that it got a little stiff or less believable in that last sentence, Scott. You have a keen ear.

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    15 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear marvel.tr's recording

    I just want to see if you get this.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6875/script-recording-31228.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Marvel.tr, you have good diction, and a very nice voice. I think all this read needs is a little more conversational tone and it'll be great. It's not bad at all though. I look forward to listening to more of your entries soon.

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    3 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear voiceartist's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2475/script-recording-11387.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Artist, you need to watch your recording level--it's way too low here. And there's an annoying line hum in there somewhere, which may be related. Hard to assess the delivery when the background is so distracting.

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    85 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear darcyd's recording

    I hope everyone's week is off to a great start. Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-85385/script-recording-79351.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice was very well suited for this script. You did a good job on your pacing. The recording was clear and easy to understand. The only thing I found that was a bit off were your sentence ends. Your voice went down instead of up. Other than that, I really enjoyed this read.

    Peer Feedback:

    Your pace was good, and you're engaged, but I don't feel that you're connected. Mostly because of the words you were or weren't punching, and I didn't get any comforting from you.

    Take the first "want" Ideally, we're watching this at the dentist's office, so we know he wants us to watch it... just rush over it to get to the why. Then when you rush over ""We want..informed" to me that's where you should bring in an emotional change. If there's a "comfort care menu" this makes think this is specifically for people who are really nervous about receiving dental care. And your happy go lucky comes off as disregarding that.

    You also have a tendency to hit the same pitch on your points eg technology/procedures/require all hit the same note. Makes it a bit sing songy.

    I also felt the articulation could have been a bit sharper.

    But good job :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you Mark and Bean,

    Very valid points and another reason this forum is so helpful. Things I just don't pick out listening back to myself.

    Thanks again, very useful feedback.

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    3 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Kabirsvoice's recording

    I have always been told my voice is too urban to do medical..do not bother...so I figured I woud try and get some feedback. Thanks.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3214/script-recording-13589.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This sounded good Kabir, but your delivery could be smoother.

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    6 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Phil Williams's recording

    I've not done any medical readings before, and as a newbie...there's a search to find the niche...I'd appreciate any feedback...thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3299/script-recording-14583.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice work Phil
    You breezed through the medical lingo and you were clear.
    I liked the speed too

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi skoshi,
    Thanks very much...still trying to find the elusive "niche"...
    I appreciate your feedback.

    Peer Feedback:

    It was a nice attempt but I felt as if you were reading the words rather than really thinking about what the implications were if someone actually has these types of symptoms.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you very much for the comments on this Medical read...I've redone it, hopefully with a better sense of what I was actually reading...thanks for any additional comments.

    Peer Feedback:

    The pacing was good. If it is intended for an educational video, for example, I think you have a good read here. As mentioned above, it does not sound concerned about the ramifications if someone has these symptoms, but I didn't get the feeling that's what you were aiming for.

    Peer Feedback:

    you have a nice voice, but I thought it could have been paced slightly faster.If this was an in depth training tape, it might get lengthy.

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    7 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Voiceologist's recording

    The feedback from this sight is truly invaluable. Thx!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-5243/script-recording-19783.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds very good. Your voice is easy to listen to and should be perfect for these types of scripts. At about 7 seconds, "blood vessels" sounds a bit muffled. Other than that, great pacing and clarity.

    Peer Feedback:

    Funny Javier, I thought that it sounded too brassy and toned down that area with the EQ. I'll change it back. Thx for your comment.

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    3 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Andi Arndt's recording

    Wanted to try a medical narration piece, since I am pretty sure I'd do well at it (I teach anatomy as part of my university-level voice for theatre class, and also studied Latin). Hope to get some feedback!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-4687/script-recording-17960.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Andi, very nice read. It is well articulated, clear, and well paced. My only comment is that you omitted the noted percentages of water and collagen. This may or may not be important. Personally, I would include that information since someone took to time to note it. Otherwise, good job!

    E

    Peer Feedback:

    Score! You did well on this one... you held my interest in what could potentially be a very boring piece for somebody who doesn't really know the subject; and that is one of the hardest thing to do with these paragraph long science type scritps.

    The missing percentages...again it's hard to say if that's a problem..perhaps they were not supposed to be read out and would appear on-screen during the video. Regardless, good work.

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    2 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear blackstone.lawrence's recording

    Hi there ! Will reciprocate. I've got thick skin, let me have it.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2611/script-recording-14617.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Again, great voice, but I think you need to work on modulation. If you listen closely, you'll notice that the volume of your voice on some words is somewhat erratic.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Blackstone! Overall this is decent, not bad! Once again I do agree with Javier :). I also hear the same kind of odd rythymic pattern of reading in certain sections. There are also sections where you you almost sound like your kind of just blazing through the sentence - almost sounding like you don't care, want to get it over with, etc. It's not that you read it too fast but just in a non-authentic tone. A prime example of this was this sentence "The collagen’s unique shape, arrangement and spacing are essential in making the cornea transparent." You also missed the word "unique" in that sentence but you may have already known that. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback, I've listened to your recordings and respect your opinion.

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice recording quality. I agree a bit too fast. Slightly more pause needed at commas.

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    4 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear flippertrojan's recording

    once again, being an MD, trying my hand at some medical narration for my niche...what y'all think?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3131/script-recording-13700.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Go for it - this would be an excellent niche for you if you're an MD and you've got a wonder voice (for this and many other applications). I think you mispronounced distributes - to my ear - your emphasis was on the first syllable and it should be on the second. But other than than - this was excellent including the recording quality.

    Peer Feedback:

    Yep. I agree with GC. Also be careful not to chop-off the ends of some words as this can make your delivery sound a little....well...choppy. :-) A LOT to like though!

    Peer Feedback:

    Whew! Your voice tone is fantastic. I'd hire you in a second! This is definitely your niche. I agree about the "distributes".

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    7 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Taylor Made Voices's recording

    This is a one take submission that can have better polish with practice. Am more curious about the audio quality that others are hearing, i.e. background hiss/audible breathing. Any & all feedback is appreciated. Thank you!! from Robert

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-547/script-recording-17753.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Taylor,
    There are a number of things that can be done to eliminate either background or line noise. Here are some:

    A hum eliminator. A Mixer. Your software.

    The hum eliminator's job is to eliminate line noise. The mixer will allow you to control the level of noise via the slider. Your software, depending on what it is, should have a noise reduction feature. It works well but you have to learn how to use it because it can distort your vocal if it's not set right.

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    8 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Voice Choice's recording

    This is my second download to this site. Very appreciative of any and all feedback. Thanks.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-1877/script-recording-19284.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, welcome to the forum. Nice voice for this copy. A couple of things. The pacing is strong for the 3/4's of the copy and you seem to take a few extra breaths between words. You also hear each time you take a breath. You make want to back away from your mic a tad. Also, the recording was panned all the way right. Other than that good vocal. keep it up....gman

    Peer Feedback:

    You have such a nice, clear voice and it sounds very professional. Good tone and good pronunciation. It is not easy finding anything wrong with this but maybe smooth it out a little and speed up the pace a touch. I think this was near perfect.

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    Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Script:

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects millions of Americans. Like osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis occurs more frequently in women than in men. Adult rheumatoid arthritis can occur in people in their 20s and 30s, though it appears more commonly in those over 45 years of age. Researchers now believe that treating rheumatoid arthritis early and aggressively not only may control joint pain, inflammation, and stiffness, but also may slow the progression of the disease.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on a recording of this script that one of your peers recorded.

    • bish January 27, 2011
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    Running Basics

    Script:

    Run faster by relaxing. Almost any runner who can look less tortured while running will probably run faster. For that “less tortured” look, concentrate on this sequence:

    1. Most important, relax your jaw. If you can relax your jaw, everything starts to open up.

    2. Consciously drop your shoulders. They should be loose and down, not tightly bunched up around your ears.

    3. Shake out your hands and arms.

    4. Think “smooth, efficient, fast.” Say it again: “Smooth, efficient, fast.”

    Recordings:

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    Senior Living Community - Video Brochure

    Script:

    At our senior village, you’ll have plenty of time to be active – because you can leave the cooking to us. Your monthly fee covers one meal a day – and you can use it for any meal in any dining room. Most people are happy to say goodbye to planning, shopping and cooking night after night. Plus you’ll never eat alone again. There’s always someone new to meet in our dining rooms.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 3 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Skin Cancer

    Script:

    Women between the ages of 25 and 29 get melanomas more than any other cancer. But most of them neglect the top stay-safe strategy: a monthly skin exam -- yes, even in the winter. Skin cancer can surface throughout the year -- in fact, the sun you got last summer may be the mole you see right now. Look for any change in the shape, size, or color of moles, and watch out for ones that bleed or have a crusty texture. See a dermatologist once every two years for a professional skin check -- or make an annual visit if skin cancer runs in your family.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 4 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Smile

    Script:

    Want to improve your smile?
    Cosmetic dental procedures, including bridges, crowns, whitening, veneers, implants, braces, or gum reshaping are all wsys to improve the look of your smile.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on a recording of this script that one of your peers recorded.

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    Swan-Ganz Catheters

    Script:

    The purpose of this video is to present the senior nursing student with basic information about Swan-Ganz catheters, and caring for critically-ill patients, with this hemodynymic monitoring device. The Swan-Ganz catheter is a term used to described any balloon flow-directed pulmonary artery catheter. The catheter was developed in the early 1970’s by two physicians – Dr. Swan and Dr. Ganz.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 2 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    The Endothelin Axis

    Script:

    The endothelin axis, which comprises endothelins and their receptors, is thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of tumors, including prostate, ovarian, colon, lung, breast, and kidney tumors.

    Endothelins are peptides that exert their effects by binding via two G-protein coupled receptors, endothelin receptor A and B (ET-A and ET-B). ET-A and ET-B appear to promote tumor progression by several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and bone deposition in skeletal metastases through activation of osteoblasts.

    Activation of ET-A by endothelin-1 promotes tumor growth and progression by inhibiting apoptosis, synergizing with other growth factors to cause cell proliferation, and by stimulating the production of the key angiogenic factor vedge-F in response to hypoxia. ET-A activation also induces matrix-degrading enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases and urokinase plasminogen activator, which have important roles in tissue remodeling and tumor metastasis.

    In neuronal cells, ET-1/ET-A binding is involved in nociceptive effects associated with cancer bone metastasis and remodeling, and thus may be associated with the bone pain in patients with bone metastasis. In contrast, activation of ET-B by ET-1 promotes vasodilation and induces apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 5 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    The Vagus Nerve

    Script:

    The vagus nerve represents the nerve of the fourth and subsequent branchial arches. Caudally from the ganglion inferius, it descends along the internal carotid artery and the common carotid artery and arrives in the mediastinum via the superior thoracic aperture. The right nerve passes over the subclavian artery, and the left over the aortic arch and behind the root of the lungs. From that point on, both nerves are in close contact with the esophagus, forming the esophageal plexus. Terminal branches pass with the esophagus into the abdominal cavity via the diaphragmatic esophageal hiatus.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 4 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    The Vetscan VS2

    Script:

    Introducing the all new Vetscan VS2, the only single, point of care that provides accurate testing information in minutes. With a new sleek, state of the art design, the VS2 offers simple menu driven choices on a high resolution full color touch screen.

    With only two whole drops of blood for each rotor, getting immediate blood test results, with uncompromising accuracy, has never been easier.

    The immediate results from the Vetscan VS2 system allows doctors to diagnose and begin treating patients during one office visit and allows for better medical care, and quite frequently, a better outcome.

    With Vetscan's trusted name and proven performance, the next generation Vetscan VS2 point of care analyzer, enhances the ability of veterinarians to diagnose health issues in real time at the point of care.

    New features and benefits of the VS2 are:

    * Precision reference laboratory quality results with built in quality control and calibration called: IQC

    * A simple, intuitive, and easy to navigate user interface.

    * Maintenance free

    * Speed: Capability of ten minutes or less

    * Small platform, space saving, and elegant design

    * Complete portability

    * Customizable reference ranges, instrument settings and preferences

    * The ability to accomodate advancing technologies for new rotors and CD rom software upgrades

    * Five different language options

    * Direct compatibility with supported USB peripherals such as keyboards, printers and networks

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on a recording of this script that one of your peers recorded.

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    Vitamins

    Script:

    Vitamins are molecules that are essential for normal body functioning. They make possible the processes in the body that digest, absorb, and use nutrients. There are 15 vitamins, most of which cannot be made by the body and must be supplied in the diet. Vitamins are needed in very small amounts by the body, but when they are not provided, deficiency diseases may occur. These diseases are relatively rare in Western countries, but some are still common in less wealthy parts of the world. The vitamins can be divided into two groups. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble vitamins. Vitamin C...ascorbic acid, and the B-group vitamins, B1...thiamine, B2... riboflavin, B3...niacin, B6, B12, folacin, pantothenic acid and biotin, are water-soluble.

    Recordings:

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    Waterlase Hydrokinetic Procedure

    Script:

    Your dentist wants you to watch this video, so that you are completely comfortable with your upcoming Waterlase HydroKinetic procedure. The Waterlase uses technology to pea variety of dental procedures, one or more of which you require.

    We want you to be informed. So in the next 15-minutes, you will learn about the latest care options, and how they will affect you. Using the supplied video glasses and CD player, you will 'virtually' experience the entire procedure. At anytime, you can pause the presentation and choose an option from the Comfort Care Menu, linked below.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 3 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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    Yasmin

    Script:

    As if finding the right guy wasn't hard enough. Now you've got to find the right birth control pill. Yasmin knows the secret to both is good chemistry. A pill that works with your body chemistry? Yasmin is the only birth control pill that affects the excess sodium and water in your body while also maintaining, or in some cases increasing your potassium. That's because Yasmin contains a different kind of hormone, which makes it a different kind of pill. And or course, it's a low-does pill that's clinically proven to be over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. Talk to your campus clinic about Yasmin. Even if the guy turns out to be wrong, you could end up with the right pill.

    Recordings:

    Hear and comment on 2 recordings of this script that your peers recorded.

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