Voice Over Education Blog

Welcome to the Voice Over Blog

Welcome to the blog designed for anyone investigating, starting, and building their voice over career.

Here you'll find practical articles written to help you skip the "trial and error" often associated with pursuing and building a career, and instead gain a candid look into the voice over industry, where the work is, why some people get it, why some don't, and tips and techniques to help you reach your goals.

Remember that your voice, interests, and potential are unique. For this reason, our articles provide multiple ideas and scenarios so that you can make the right decision for your career.

Feel welcome to share any experiences and comments by posting them below each post. We're always glad to listen to you. After all, listening is what we do best!

Should you ever volunteer to do voice-over for free?


Here at Edge Studio, we've long made the point that a well-trained voice artist is already experienced when he or she produces a demo and enters the VO job market. Our course plan covers a wide range of script and directorial situation in the student's particular genre(s) or specialty, with comprehensive coaching and realistic performance situations, and what's more, we provide experience in business development and other aspects of our field.

Still, when starting your voice-over career, additional experience is almost always a plus. (In fact, it's a plus throughout your career!)

One way to add to your experience is volunteer work. But should you volunteer to do voice work for free? There are pros and cons, so read on...

Both schools of thought are valid. There are reasons to provide free services, and there are reasons not to.

Why you should not volunteer your services for free.

Turn print text into VO demo scripts in yet more genres. Part 4 of 4.


NOTE: This is the fourth post in a 4-part series. Click here to start at Part 1! Click here to start at Part 2! Click here to start at Part 3!

In this series, we've looked at the various parts of a print ad, and which of them can be used in a Commercials demo script. Then we looked at the process of cutting a script for time. And last week, we showed how to convert print copy into demo copy for Narration, Explainers and Telephony. Can you also do this for Animation and Games, or Corporate Narration, or even Museum Tours? Let's see ...

This process works for almost any genre. Sometimes the difference is in the type of source material, and what you pull from it. Here are three more, just for example.

Writing Animation and Game characters

SOURCE:

  • Reader's Digest
    http://www.rd.com/jokes/funny-stories/


    “I got asked about punctuality. I went on about how it was good to speak clearly and politely, and it was nice to use proper grammar in speech and writing.”

SCRIPT:

    Ask me anything. I know about periods, and commas, and semicolons. I'm the champion at a madcap dash. You wanna hear me use an exclamation point!?? Yessiree, I know everything there is to know about punctuality.

NOTE: In telling a joke, it's usually best to put the "surprise/payoff" word last. So we moved the reference to "punctuality."

Can you turn print copy into a VO demo script for any genre? Part 3 of 4.


NOTE: This is the third post in a 4-part series. Click here to start at Part 1! Click here to start at Part 2! Click here to read Part 4!

Previously, we demonstrated how to turn a print ad into copy for a radio or TV commercial, and how to cut it down to the mere 5-10 seconds you'd want for your demo. You can start with almost any decent print text, such as a magazine ad, a brochure, information in an encyclopedia, corporate training manual – whatever seems interesting, well suited to you, and right for the genre you're demo-ing. You'll also want to have some variety in your collection of clips.

How can you do this with any genre? How do they differ? Let's take a look at turning various types of print copy into an explainer, corporate presentation, a telephony script, or whatever you need.

First, decide what type of information would be typical of the genre you're aiming at. Then think broadly. What kind of work would you like to do? And what would show you in your best light?

There are two differences between a Commercials demo and most other genres.

How to distill a script to the right length for your demo. Part 2 of 4.


NOTE: This is the second post in a 4-part series. Click to read  Part 1  ...  Part 3  ...  Part 4

Last week, we demonstrated how to turn a print ad into a radio or TV commercial demo script. But for a Commercials demo, your cuts should each be 10 seconds (or so) at most. So now, let's look at how to distill it down to the mere 5-10 seconds you'd want to use. (Note: Demo cuts in some other genres tend to be a bit longer.)

You'll also see how, as in preparing a sauce, this "reduction" process often makes the script tastier!

As we demonstrated in Part 1, you can start with almost any decent print text, such as a magazine ad, a brochure, information in an encyclopedia, corporate training manual – whatever seems interesting, well suited to you, and right for the genre you're demo-ing. You'll also want to have some variety in your collection of clips.

How to cut copy down to 5-10 seconds

The original:

I have a problem when it comes to ice cream. I can't make an ice cream cone with less than 5 scoops. Because every time I start scooping Froball ice cream, I start thinking of all the reasons I love it. How do I lick this problem?

Now get out your blue pencil (or, if you used to work at Time Magazine, a green one), or your delete key, and weigh every word:

  • Pare it down to essential thoughts
  • Don't repeat unnecessarily
  • Delete unneeded words
  • Replace "wordy" phrases with single words

The results:

VO professionals' tips from Edge Studio's Tips Jar at WoVOCon


Our business is a wonderful combination of communication skills and the arts, with a strong sense of community and professional relationships. True of almost any business, but especially in our line of work, people realize that by helping others, they help themselves.

So at WoVOCon last month, we put out a "Tips Jar," inviting people to contribute whatever gems of advice or inspiration they have for their fellow voice-artists. We were very excited to receive so many VO tips, and here we'll share them ...

While we're at it, a further thank-you. We had a great time at WoVOCon, not the least as we served coffee and tea at the Edge Studio Cafe. In an industry that requires us to spend so much time behind the scenes, we are grateful for opportunities that enable people to step forward and come together.

As we observed awhile back, in our article A Strategic Approach to Voice-over Industry Networking, face-to-face conversation is important for a variety of reasons, including:

  • By connecting with other voice-over talent, you may eventually be referred for a job that another voice actor isn't right for, or doesn't have time for.
  • Almost anyone might have an eventual opportunity.
  • Being at events demonstrates that you’re a committed professional.
  • Visibility makes you more than just another name in their address book.

So you might recognize some of the names, faces and voices of the people below. They're in random order. Help yourself!

From the Edge Studio Voice-Over Tips Jar

How to Reach Us

Call us 888-321-3343
Email us training@edgestudio.com

Click for Edge location information...

Meet Your Coaches

Edge Alumni Work Everyday

Get free educational
voice over newsletters!

Get free, educational voice over newsletters

Where should we send them?