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The Voice Actor Feedback Forum

Script Genres > English Adult > Narration > Documentary

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    'Sgt. Pepper' 50th Anniversary: The Making of a Rock Classic - Extended Intro

    Script:

    Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band spun the music industry on its heels. When the album came out, the public devoured it, the critics raved, and other musicians stopped in their tracks, recognizing that the game had changed forever.

    69 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear hushpanda's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-169848/script-recording-107989.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Hush The recording quality is great and you have a nice tone. I would love to hear this read with a bit more emotional energy/enthusiasm that would fit the content so well. I mean, it's the Beatles. They were SO colorful and had so much dimension. Try your next take imagining that you're talking to someone who has never heard of the Beatles, but you know would love them, so you're trying to convey what a big deal the band was.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi! You speak clearly, but you did make a mistake with the name of the album. Also, it sounds like you're really close to the mic and there is some background noise. And, as the other commenter said, some more energy would be great. Good try and keep at it!!

    Peer Feedback:

    There is a pretty clear edit after the title of the album and the rest of the line. Make sure when you edit takes together you have the same quality throughout. Also, more emotion and tone with the album title would be nice. Thanks for sharing!

    Peer Feedback:

    You have such a nice voice, but you are so unenthused on the subject matter. The public devoured it! Critics raved! Spun the industry on its heels! but you're --meh.
    You must get the name of the album right. Your audience will hear that mistake and miss the next two lines.
    A pretty good deal of mouth noise, I think Cecily W is right that you may be too close to the mic.
    "Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band" is the spring board of the whole paragraph. This must be clear and purposeful. Do not rush it, do not throw it away to get to those action phrases. Those action phrases are coming off of this amazing collection of songs --this title has to convey the importance of the words that follow.

    Peer Feedback:

    You got the title wrong. Total audition killer.

    put more life your read! This about a game changer! The critics are gobsmacked! This is the 60's!

    cheers,
    DS

    Peer Feedback:

    ...What Dave said...apart from the misread on a classic title, it needs more excitement.
    - touzet -

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    1933

    Script:

    1933 was dark all over the world.
    Japan was already in Manchuria, and the League of Nations was dying in Geneva.
    In Germany, the Reichstag fire was history, so was the Weimar Republic.
    In Italy, Benito Mussolini had translated a people’s search for security into savage conquest.
    In rich, fertile America, fear and uncertainty lay heavy upon the land.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt stood beside Chief Justice Hughes on the steps of the Capitol on that raw afternoon of March 4th, and a nation with 15 million unemployed…listened.

    72 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear bigglescomfychair's recording

    First recording in my newly-finished studio environment. If household conditions are just right, it seems pretty quiet. Whaddya think?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-162167/script-recording-107789.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for creating such a service. I really liked this post. In exchange, I want to recommend a service that will help you not only to study wit , but also to organize your working time correctly.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for creating such a service. I really liked this post. In exchange, I want to recommend a service that will help you not only to study with a lot of samples https://tooly.io/civil-rights-movement/ , but also to organize your working time correctly.

    Peer Feedback:

    In regards to sound quality, I couldn't hear anything that didn't need to be there so good job with the environment. As for the read. It felt a bit choppy. Some parts were fast and then you would pause at an odd place and then continue on. Try to think in phrases.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012.

    225 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Hamish's recording

    Hi Michael @EdgeStudio. Hello from Japan. I'm presently in a research-phase of beginning my own Voice-Over business & the recording i've uploaded for you to critique, is what i've entered into your EdgeStudioContest. It (the recording) feels to be a good honest start HOWEVER with practice, i think it could certainly be much improved. For example -> a more dynamic/flexible voice tone. All i used was my iPhone4 to record this one, which seems to be of a decent quality. Do you have some arising questions for myself, that you'd like to ask ..? If you'd like to talk about the recording on the phone, when's a good day/time to call your office ..?..If yes -> on this number 888-321-3343 ..? With Regards. Hamish Holmes. (e-signatured. +8180-2489-2947.)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-27721/script-recording-47095.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Hamish -
    this isn't Michael@edgestudio.com (FYI). you submitted your request to the entire viewing audience...
    so here's what I think:
    your voice has a nice texture and register. great raw material to work with.

    you sounded really nervous, or tentative at the mic. If you do voice recordings 100 times, that feeling goes away on the 101st.
    What accent is that? I'll go out on a limb and not guest Australian -- I'll say kiwi. But I'm an American, so what do I know...?
    ;-)

    Cheers, and I look forward to your next 99 submissions! Hopefully you'll find Edgestudio feedback forum to be a great resource.

    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you have a great voice, to me the read sounded liked it needed to be a little faster read.I'm new to this so take that in mind.Good Job

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounding choppy, maybe bigger breaths to make it sound more fluid. Tone is good but maybe a little lighter on the mono tone and a little more not a lot of excitement make it feel more like you care about the copy. Good Job.

    Peer Feedback:

    I too think it has too be a little faster, need to add some intrigue since this sounds a little too boring, try to change speeds, go up and down in tones etc.

    Peer Feedback:

    This is the nice content for me to be aware of. I'm also wondering if you have content about glass staircases and all the moments related to it. This info would be just in time for our work at so I'm looking for the decent in-depth thoughts about it.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    126 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MHeyden's recording

    Any and all comments appreciated - a few of the words that I hit are now sounding questionable to me!!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10833/script-recording-53786.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi MHeyden,

    I think you have very good timing and diction.

    My one comment on this recording is that, to me, given the subject matter, your reading sounds a little happy. I might like to hear it with a little more serious tone, perhaps even a sense of possible impending doom in places, just to give it a little more drama. (Without going over the top, of course.)

    Just my 2 cents.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi again, Bquesada - your 2 cents is very valued - thanks. I know what you mean. I have a bit hard time sounding "doom like", because it seems to border on a mean tone, so perhaps I over compensated and sound a little too perky. Will work on that. Thanks!

    Peer Feedback:

    Nicely read. I think there could be a little more feeling of despair when talking about the end of the world.

    Peer Feedback:

    I really like your voice as well as the read. I agree with the others, adding a bit of drama would make it sound more Nat Geoish. I look forward to hearing your future recordings.

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice. Your diction and timing are excellent. I'm not sure if I would like hearing it in a more despairing tone or not. Your interpretation that made it sound a little upbeat worked for me. You never know though. It depends on what the client is looking for.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    77 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear michael_danalis's recording

    I just bought my first mic set up and am learning how to use everything so please let me know how it sounds and what you think of the rad as well. Thanks

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-89368/script-recording-72437.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Great vocal quality, very smooth. I might suggest more variance (inflection) in the delivery as there is a tendency toward monotone. I didn't hear much in the way of background noise, but a few mouth noises (clicks) were noticeable. The material is a good match for your voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for the feedback,on your point about the clicks I can tell you what that is. I have a tongue ring in and it clicks with certain words. I normally take it out when doing work but unfortunately I had surgery on one arm and I have one arm immobile so I can not remove it at this time. Sorry for the clicks but there are not usually there. Thanks again.

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you have an excellent voice. There seems to be some diction issues with ending t's and "awso" vs also. That may be the ring you mentioned to some extent. There's a little bit of a choppy rhythmic cadence with some of the sentences pausing in odd places.

    One of my pet peeves in recording is over-agressive noise gating. For me that's very distracting. That effect can be lessened by slowing the decay rate down as well as raising the point that the gate falls down to ...i.e. don't make it so far down.

    Peer Feedback:

    this sounded very "read" that you were reading a script to the audience. There needs to be a connection from the script to the audience and that was absent. Imagine speaking this to a friend instead of to the mic.

    Peer Feedback:

    Great sound. I would agree that it is a bit monotonous. Try hitting different words by upwards or downwards inflection to bring a little life to it. Play around and see what happens.

    Peer Feedback:

    Great voice. Interpretation was ok but I think you missed the sense of urgency (my pinion). Also, the sentence "...all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? " was completed as a statement rather than a question. Was a bit mono tone. Some nasal noise was heard. I'm not sure what the technique is for handling nasal noise but it would be nice to know what it is since I have the same type of problem.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    116 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear mojoey's recording

    Hi Everyone. I'm brand new to both voiceovers and this site. What a great resource this site is! Although I've been wanting to try voiceovers for a long time, I'm just now at a point where I can give it a go. I'm looking forward to the possibilities. With that, I'd love feedback regarding the tone of my voice and overall performance. Is there potential? I'm not completely sure what genre I'd like to pursue, but would love anyone's initial thoughts just by what you hear. Thanks in advance! --Joey

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-108747/script-recording-85649.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Potential? Yes, definitely. But don't mistake simply having a nice voice as all there is to VO. It's how you use it. That includes, in a large part, how to break down and interpret copy, whether it be commercial, narration, eLearning, telephony, corporate, audiobooks, etc.

    The positives:
    - Your voice is pleasant.
    - Your accent is very close to Neutral American (which is in vogue) and articulate.
    - You're not announcery in your delivery.
    - And, assuming that you did this in one continuous take (no editing), you read very well.

    The downsides:
    - Although you read very well, it sounds like just that - it sounds like you're reading. Some dead giveaways: The long A sound before "violent apocalypse..." and "calamitous end time?" and "coming cataclysm." Do you normally talk that way. I would suggest that in conversation most people wound use the short A sound and say, "uh violent apocalypse..." and "uh calamitous end time?" and "uh coming cataclysm." (Notice: You used the short A on "a 2012 prophecy.")
    - You're "acting the punctuation". I hear every comma, period, the dashes and even the quotation marks - either by taking a breath or a pause. If I were to close my eyes and transcribe this narrative from what I hear, I could probably write it out nearly exactly as it is written. One of the tricky things about VO is to get past what you see on the page and get into an interpretive mode. How would you say this to a friend, relative, stranger, etc? We don't necessarily converse in punctuated sentences - the thoughts flow from out brains to our speech as they come to us - even if they are totally complete, grammatically correct and correctly punctuated sentences.
    - There is quite a bit of mouth noise (big lip smack right at the top) and some disturbing breath sounds (kind of a "double-clutch" breath sound before the second sentence). If this was an actual job, most of those things would be edited out or otherwise taken care of in post production. But you can make the editor's/engineer's job easier by attempting to eliminate those things in the first place.
    - Some of the pacing may be slightly too swift which causes you to smash some words together and make them less articulate than the rest of the narrative. Example: "What did the Mayans think..." turned into "WhahdidahMayans think..."

    And finally: Although you didn't ask about recording quality - a thought. Don't use reverb. I am assuming that what I hear is a plugin or some kind of preset effect in your software rather than the "live-ness" or reflective nature of your recording environment. Reverb is rarely, if ever used (except for possibly a specific artistic effect) for VO.

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow James. I really appreciate your constructive criticism. I just wanted to upload something to get some initial feedback since I'm pretty new to all of this so, as you noted, I didn't really do any editing out of mouth noises and such. I did most of it in one take but there were a few pickups I edited in.

    Yeah, I just used Garage Band's "narration" plug-in. I didn't make any tweaks to any settings on purpose. I thought twice about the reverb but, again, I just wanted to upload something. Nevertheless, thanks for pointing that out.

    My plan is to register for the "Investigate Voiceover" class that Edge offers and take it from there. I'm also looking into ACX.com for audiobook work.

    Thanks again.

    Peer Feedback:

    The "Investigate Voiceover" class is well worth the money. And if you continue on with one of Edge's programs, that outlay gets applied to the program. (Not a commercial for Edge.) But I can probably guarantee you that they will encourage you to continue pursuing VO and advise you as to what genre might best suit you. You read really well, so long form narration and audiobooks might be a jumping off point.

    Garage Band? Thought so. Others may disagree, but you should investigate another DAW (software) other than Garage Band. It's mostly a simple consumer music production piece of software and not the best choice for VO - unless you really know how to tweak it toward VO production. There are some people who do use it effectively for VO. George Whittam is a real big cheerleader for Twisted Wave for Mac users.

    Look into Audacity, it's free and relatively simple to use. However, it does have its downsides.
    http://audacityteam.org/download/
    And you'll need the LAME MP3 encoder to render MP3's
    http://lame.sourceforge.net/

    I am a big Reaper devotee. The licensing fee is only $60 and it comes with a ton of FX plugins. The learning curve is pretty steep at first, but after you have that "Aha!" moment, you'll wonder why you ever used anything else. And - Audible Studios (which owns ACX) uses it for their recording (along with Sound Forge). Plus, you can download it (a totally non-cripled version) and play with it for 60 days before purchasing the license.
    http://www.reaper.fm/download.php
    The Manual PDF is over 400 pages long, most of which you'll never need to know for VO production.
    Don't forget to also download and install the SWS extensions to add power to Reaper.
    http://www.sws-extension.org/
    You'll also need the same LAME MP3 encoder as Audacity uses to render MP3's.

    As far as ACX goes. It's totally free to set up a profile and start auditioning. But I would caution you to read their production requirements and guidelines very carefully. First and foremost, you will need a very quiet environment in which to do your recording. And the editing and processing of the audio needs to meet their standards. Realize that the rights holders don't necessarily know what good audiobook production is or should be. They're (mostly) just authors and they love to hear their words read to them by a good voice. It would truly be a shame if you snagged a long book, the rights holder loves your work, you poured yourself (and your time) into it only to have it rejected by ACX's quality control standards. You can't (always) fix bad audio. Audio Engineers have a saying - "Garbage In, Garbage Out." The biggest investment you'll make is in sound treating (deadening) your recording space.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Mojoey,
    I'm not going to address the technical aspects of your read. There are more than enough people on this board that will provide accurate commentary on that subject. My concern is more delivery oriented. You read well, however, virtually everyone will tell you that that is not enough. So, what is? You don't see posts going into great depth on this subject. Why? Because all too often what is missing are intangibles. How do you describe an intangible? I can only try. First off, no one on this board wants to be read too. Truth be had, your audience are all readers themselves and if so inclined may decide to record it themselves if for no other reason than to show it can be done better. People are imperfect and just do those sorts of things. Though to their credit they may be right. Now, the intangible. When you choose a script, are you interested in the material? It is important to tackle projects that captivate your imagination. Why? Because when you record the material what goes into the microphone and out of the speakers will not be your finely tuned articulate speech, but your intangible interest in your subject. That is highly contagious! That is what will captivate your audience just as it captivated you. Always be conscious that your purpose in approaching the microphone is not to disseminate your eloquence but rather to communicate. You job is to entice your audience and seduce their egos into submission. You must arouse their interest and then close with them saying gee I didn't know that. There are innumerable intangibles. Each serves as a tool in your VO success, but the best tool is knowing what tool or tools to use on any given project. Just my two cents. Ciao

    Peer Feedback:

    The potential is definitely there. I think you have an interesting storyteller voice for narration. The sound needs some improvement, but the talent is there. Pursue it.

    Danny

    Peer Feedback:

    James: Thank you for your software recommendations. I've already downloaded Audacity and am looking also at ProTools. I will check out Reaper for sure. I highly respect your opinion just from reading what you've posted for others as well. I am registered for the intro class and found a social media workshop (how to maximize it for voiceover) next week!

    Richurd: I appreciate your advice! All very solid tips that I'll be using going forward for sure. I'm looking forward to getting even more feedback from you and others here.

    Danny: Wow, great to hear. I'm pleased you think I have potential. That is my initial focus right now so I'm very optimistic that I'm making the right decision to pursue this career. Thanks again.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    59 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MusicJunkieK1's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-131/script-recording-62735.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You're good. Really good. Great voice and great recording quality. And you seem to know how to breathe while recording, which is a skill I haven't yet figured out. Nit pick time! Because your fundamentals are so good I'm thinking about things like mouth noise and enunciation. For example I don't hear the "t" in "suggests." A few other t's in the recording are likewise missing.

    Back to top

    104 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear samuelwilliams's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-122203/script-recording-93837.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The background music that really set the mood. I'm no expert by any means still a novice in this myself, the start was flowing beautifully but it then sounded a like you lost interest, otherwise you have a nice clear voice and your voice has what I felt to be great for the subject narration. Good luck :)

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    47 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear TallRobert's recording

    Another stab at this documentary read with suggestions made by other peers.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/2012_Apocalypse_2_2014.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Not liking the upswing on the end of "The Maya"... It's past even sounding like a question.. The words " winter equinox " sounds a little similar as well, I thought for a second that you were doing it as the Swedish chef, from the Muppets. Other wise, it was a pretty good read. Nice music, good pace.

    Peer Feedback:

    Yeah, I have to agree, KNM. Not happy with the opening. Think I might take a little more "over-the-top" approach to it, see if "too far" can be "far enough". Something with more gravitas and sense of danger.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ditto knm's comment here. I'm still very much a fan of the first read. As with James's comment earlier on the first read, the first read is soooo 2012, BUT, the first read is how I would have expected it to sound in 2012 and has the feel of what I were to expect if someone told me it was from 2012. Perhaps being outdated, the script could maybe use a lighter, post-apocalyptic rewrite? I capped the changes I made... James, any suggestions?

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time endED in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stopPED abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincideD with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which WERE remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even useD an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggestED the world WAS headed toward THE coming cataclysm. What COULD WE HAVE DONE to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    Peer Feedback:

    It may be possible, tj. But I'm not sure that even a really good re-write, such as yours, would make this script any less dated. It has become, what we call in the theatre, "a period piece". IMHO, there are only three possible ways to treat it.

    1. As a serious, semi-factual reference to the Maya by putting yourself in a pre-2012 mindset. And considering that, with other emerging evidence, the story continues and the plot gets thicker.

    2. As one of those "Unsolved Mysteries" kind of things right up there with Roswell, Area 54 and "American Treasure". Not out of the realm of possibility, but maybe out of the realm of probability. A fancy or a fantasy.

    3. As a total spoof, with the afterknowledge that the "End of the World" didn't happen. Yet.

    I would never discourage anyone from doing a read of this script. As dated as it is, it's still a good script. It's loaded with good stuff to play with. You'd just have to commit to how you'd treat it. And throw in all that good ol' VO technique as well to bring it to life.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    43 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear TallRobert's recording

    A crack at some documentary styled VO. iPhone mic, so looking more for performance notes. Was trying for 'serious and dire" while still being informative. Thanks so much for your time.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Apocalypse_2014.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Robert,
    Caught a script deviation- "from different parts" (said ""in" instead of "from")
    I also found my self repeating the "What did the Mayans think..." about five or six times, but I can't put my finger on it, but the statment almost feels like it was going to lead to a humourous ending - maybe that part could have been evened out a little more? I have to admit, that statment DOES lend itself to be humourous in a different context... Almost could have been said like, "What the heck did the Mayans THINK would happen when their calender ended...duh!"
    VERY good read! (I had to clear my mind of the Arizona lottery script haha), but your read was very believable - Nice Job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the critiques TJ and James. Will definitely let it sink in, and may take another crack at this. Much appreciated

    Peer Feedback:

    This copy was obviously written long before, what was supposed to be, this cataclysmic event. We now know, unless we're all living in an alternate universe or different dimension of time and space, that this apocalypse didn't happen.

    And that's one of the problems with this read. There's no sense of anticipatory suspense. You've got to climb into your way-back machine and remember that some people really believed that this "end time" was coming. A lot of them built bunkers and hoarded foodstuffs in preparation of possibly surviving it while others welcomed the coming "rapture" with open arms. No matter how far fetched it may seem now, many people were. and still are, "true believers" and couldn't, and can't, get enough of this stuff. So there's that "sense of wonder" that's missing. This is sensational stuff! The music bed helps, but it's not enough.

    Then there's the matter of those two questions in the body of the copy. You interpretation sounded more like they were a statement of fact instead of something to be pondered as real a possibility. They're meant to elicit a thought provoking response from your audience. Ask the question(s). They don't necessarily have to inflect upward at the end. Have you ever seen or heard Robert Stack narrate Unsolved Mysteries? Here's a clip:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUd0VvlhY7k

    At about :35, he asks a series of questions. He doesn't inflect upward, but you know from listening that they are questions nonetheless. He also has a pretty dry, mater-of-fact delivery style, but it's sincere and thought provoking, with a certain gravitas.

    Now, in my view, you can go a couple of different ways with last sentence. What you did was fine, if it's the lead-in or promo to the program. Fine. I see the graphic of "The Mayan Apocalypse" on the TV screen - and cue in the music - and cut to commercial. And now back to our program. Yep, that works.

    But what if this is just the beginning of a longer piece? And in the next few paragraphs, you're going to answer that question for us? So, it could possibly be the set-up for a much longer narration that continues without a break. The question needs to be a question so that you can give us possible answers - or hit us with even more questions.

    Your voice is well suited for narration, there's no disputing that. You need to dig into the copy and find the excitement. Some narration is neutral, but this has a certain POV that you can bring to it. Do you have an opinion about the subject? If pro, you could be more earnest. If con, maybe a little flippant. Find important words to stress like "26,000 years". I mean that's a long span time to think about.

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    2012 Extinction

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture, predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. They created an elaborate astronomical calendar called "The Long Count," which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with an incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years. What did the Mayans think would happen when their calendar ended? And were they joined by other cultures--from different parts of the world and in different centuries--all pointing to 2012 as a calamitous end time? The Hopi Indians and Eastern Hindus have similar calendars, which are remarkably synchronous. One counter-culture mystic even uses an Ancient Chinese philosophy to unlock the key to a 2012 prophecy. Nostradamus himself suggests the world is headed toward a coming cataclysm. What can we do to head the warning of the Mayan apocalypse?

    82 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear TallRobert's recording

    Not the greatest mic, but looking for performance notes Thanks so much

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-27041/script-recording-47048.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Well I see 25 people have listened to your script without adding any comments.
    I think you have a very good voice for this script, perfect music bed. As some voice coaches have told me, try to have a different idea or feeling in your mind for each line.
    I would like it to sound more mysterious, more intriguing. Overall great read.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Dave.

    Yeah, still learning how to keep each line fresh while not stumbling over some of the trickier bits of pronunciation. I will try another attempt over the weekend, see if the "intrigue" narration character can punch it up some.

    Thanks so much

    Peer Feedback:

    Great read,sounds awesome.

    Back to top
    2013 Heisman Preview

    Script:

    The 2013 Heisman Trophy race promises to field a group of dual-threat quarterbacks that have displayed the ability to impact the game with their tremendous passing and rushing skills.
    The trend of all-purpose quarterbacks dominating the Heisman chase continued in 2012, as Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel captured college football’s top individual award.
    Heisman voters have had a fascination with these athletes that have redefined the quarterback position in recent years. Florida’s Tim Tebow opened up the floodgates of this new Heisman era by running and passing his way to the bronzed trophy in 2007. Since then, the award has been garnered by similar performances from Auburn’s Cam Newton, Baylor’s Robert Griffin III and the Aggies Johnny Football

    40 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear adia.peterson@gmail.com's recording

    A raw recording (just a practice audio) of my voiceover student Claude. He is just starting out. We appreciate the feedback in advance. Thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2339/script-recording-99397.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You voice sounds nice. Eerily reminiscent of Morgan Freeman. You have great potential and will do well. Make the words your own. You sound like you're reading but great voice. try to sound like you're talk TO someone next time. :)

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    27 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear EStaton's recording

    This is the beginning of a script that I've written for a YouTube video I'm producing for my college football website. Again...I'm focusing on sounding more conversational and less like an announcer. Also trying to keep excitement in my voice at the same time. Look forward to your feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/2013 Heisman.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Personally, I think you'd make a mistake in trying to deliver a sports spot in a conversational way. Sports talk is loud and obnoxious as a brand. I hear the inflections of a sports announcer without the over-the top caffeine-driven vocal push. If you're writing this and delivering this, I don't think I'd deliver this as a bread commercial. My opinion is to treat this as it is: FOOTBALL PREVIEW!!

    One thing you really need to work on is breath control. You broke the first sentence up with a breath. I'm fortunate that I don't have to work on that aspect of VO, but it's important for the sentence to flow without being broken up with a quick splash and dash (motorsports analogy there.) Vocally, I think you've got the goods, but not all reads will fit "conversational."

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice job EStaton. It does still sound a little more like an announcer reading than conversational. Some of that comes from the way it is written. It might help to shorten the sentences and use more active voice verbs. For instance, you might want to say, "Heisman voters are fascinated by these athletes that, in recent years, are redefining the quarterback position." Your voice is perfectly suited for this copy.

    Peer Feedback:

    You did a great job on this. Your voice has the perfect sound for this, over all. I think even though you want it to sound conversational, you could still stand to punch some words a little more. When people talk about sports, they often do tend to be quite energetic. You don't have to sound full-on announcer, but definitely more energy, and find places to emphasize more. Also, be careful where you take your breaths. I would say to try to not breathe right before a preposition. If your sentences are too long, or the phrases are too long for you sneak a breath, you have the freedom to make changes here and there. For example, near the beginning, "...displayed the ability to impact the game with their tremendous passing and rushing skills." The breath before "with" was a little distracting to me. It may seem like a small thing, but the small thing can make a big difference. I think the script was well-written. The big things are breath control and energy.

    Back to top
    2013 Heisman Preview

    Script:

    The 2013 Heisman Trophy race promises to field a group of dual-threat quarterbacks that have displayed the ability to impact the game with their tremendous passing and rushing skills.
    The trend of all-purpose quarterbacks dominating the Heisman chase continued in 2012, as Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel captured college football’s top individual award.
    Heisman voters have had a fascination with these athletes that have redefined the quarterback position in recent years. Florida’s Tim Tebow opened up the floodgates of this new Heisman era by running and passing his way to the bronzed trophy in 2007. Since then, the award has been garnered by similar performances from Auburn’s Cam Newton, Baylor’s Robert Griffin III and the Aggies Johnny Football.

    55 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear fpyne1's recording

    Working on not having my 's' sounds so sharp, and general practice. :) Looking for any feedback on quality of audio recording, performance, tone...anything, really! Thanks so much for listening. -Frank

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-124850/script-recording-99895.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I felt the recording quality was very good, and I didn't notice any sharp 's' sounds. In terms of copy interpretation, I thought your delivery was very smooth and had good pacing to it. Depending on whether this copy is for an educational video or for the actual Heisman Trophy award ceremony, you may want to add a little excitement to the overall tone of the reading, like the TV announcers do at the beginning of a sporting
    event. I think it was well done. Good job.

    Back to top
    2013 Heisman Preview

    Script:

    The 2013 Heisman Trophy race promises to field a group of dual-threat quarterbacks that have displayed the ability to impact the game with their tremendous passing and rushing skills.
    The trend of all-purpose quarterbacks dominating the Heisman chase continued in 2012, as Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel captured college football’s top individual award.

    Heisman voters have had a fascination with these athletes that have redefined the quarterback position in recent years. Florida’s Tim Tebow opened up the floodgates of this new Heisman era by running and passing his way to the bronzed trophy in 2007. Since then, the award has been garnered by similar performances from Auburn’s Cam Newton, Baylor’s Robert Griffin III and the Aggies Johnny Football.

    12 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lesjr27's recording

    Hi everyone. This script is rather wordy so I paused several times to catch my breath. Please let me know if post-production edits were on par, as well as my speed (I tend to speak fast and am working on slowing things down).

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-171407/script-recording-108623.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Excellent work.Lesjr27,

    Your reading pace was right on.- I can hear each word pronounced correctly with the appropriate emphasis and word value.

    Overall performance and recording quality were excellent.

    Very minor point.- on 3rd listen I thought that there should be another second of silence before 'Heisman voters'..

    Peer Feedback:

    This sounds great, Lesjr27! Your pacing, inflection, and enunciation all sounded excellent. I did notice, however, that the recording is particularly quiet for some reason. I thought my volume was turned down at first but realized it was the recording itself.

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    A Gentle Robot

    Script:

    How do you carefully collect and release a squishy sea creature? Make a gentle robot.
    The 12-sided enclosure folds and unfolds like origami, trapping and releasing jellyfish, octopuses, and squid without harm. Future iterations may include the ability to take DNA samples and film video.

    65 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear mergilman's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-97138/script-recording-104183.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your pace seems to change throughout the read.

    Inflection has quite a bit of vibrato on "Gentle" "Folds" "Harm" "Samples" - I'm uncertain whether this is due to recording equipment or if you meant for those words to sound sing-songy.

    Other than that your read was accurate and clear.

    I suggest tightening up read and less vibrato on your inflections.

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    A Giant Mini Supermarket - Special Interest Story

    Script:

    This may look like the front of a vending machine. In fact, to make a purchase, all you do is dial a code and a robot sales clerk does the rest.

    Instead of just sodas or crackers, this machine offers more than five hundred items - like panty hose, shampoos, lotions, pacifiers, tooth paste, batteries – even dog food. Need to stock up the fridge? No problem. The automatic supermarket stocks all the essentials – eggs, milk, juices, ham, cheese, yogurt, fresh fruit, cake mix, bread, rice, cereal, pasta, a variety of frozen foods, and just about anything else you can think of to complete your shopping list. The automatic store offers almost every luxury you can think of – wine and liquor, cigarettes, even chocolates. About the only thing this store can’t do is carry your grocery bags for you. But the customers don’t seem to mind - and squeezed into just 500 square feet, this curious little shop just may be the convenience store of the future.

    110 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear marcus250's recording

    First try in the Feedback Forum, working on Documentary/Narration and studio sound. Thank you for your input!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-90846/script-recording-83308.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    man, I wish my first one had sounded that good :) Nice job, could stand to slow down a bit -you can hear where you were running out of steam, and the pace was just a bit quick to match to most visuals. The first list was also a bit, eh lacking in energy and smile, but you did nicely with the other lists. This copy is such a bitch for that; nicely handled. Just listening through speakers, so no feedback on sound.

    Peer Feedback:

    bean420, I hear what you mean regarding pace and energy. I'm grateful to receive your feedback!!

    Peer Feedback:

    Okay so you have done this before. Very nice. Yes the pace was a little fast but not bad. Reading that long list sounded a little winded at the end of the list but still good.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with the other comments about pacing and breath control. It's important to get the big breaths where you can and sneak the small breaths where you can. The thing I would be careful of is vocal fry. It's possible it happened because you were running out of breath.

    Back to top
    A Giant Mini Supermarket - Special Interest Story

    Script:

    This may look like the front of a vending machine. In fact, to make a purchase, all you do is dial a code and a robot sales clerk does the rest.

    Instead of just sodas or crackers, this machine offers more than five hundred items - like panty hose, shampoos, lotions, pacifiers, tooth paste, batteries – even dog food. Need to stock up the fridge? No problem. The automatic supermarket stocks all the essentials – eggs, milk, juices, ham, cheese, yogurt, fresh fruit, cake mix, bread, rice, cereal, pasta, a variety of frozen foods, and just about anything else you can think of to complete your shopping list. The automatic store offers almost every luxury you can think of – wine and liquor, cigarettes, even chocolates. About the only thing this store can’t do is carry your grocery bags for you. But the customers don’t seem to mind - and squeezed into just 500 square feet, this curious little shop just may be the convenience store of the future.

    52 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MHeyden's recording

    Hi - feedback appreciated. There's several lists in this script. Not sure if I handled the lists appropriately. Please let me know your thoughts. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10833/script-recording-54118.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think your voice is perfect for this read and your pacing was really nice- I can hear some ticking at the very last couple seconds. If you were timing it and achieved :60 without editing, nicely done! The list of items might be fun to play with but that's just me and might be intended to read straight through. I thought it was great, and nice voice!

    Peer Feedback:

    Like this one as well.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey - thanks to both of you for commenting! Appreciate it.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi MHeyden!

    I could not help but notice this read and I loved how you did it girl! Your voice is so clear, as so is the pace, and all that under a minute...!!! I loved it and had to say it!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Eva. You know how once in a while, you find a really fun script - this was one of them. Thanks for your kind words!

    Peer Feedback:

    Excellent overall; sound quality was great and your voice had a lot of variety (both inflection and volume.) You had great energy and maintained that "wow--check THIS out!" tone throughout the read. "Fresh fruit" sounded a bit forced, like you had to gather yourself or grabbed a quick breath before continuing on with the list...but that's just me nit-picking :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow.
    this read is list-calisthentics!
    Nice job. it's really tough to hold interest when you have to recite 10 things in a list. How much different forms of inflection are there!?

    enjoyed it, but I'm not going to touch it.
    DS.
    ;-)

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Michigan Tom and dfsaund - thanks for your kind words! Marianne

    Peer Feedback:

    I really liked the read. Good energy. I felt it might have been rushed slightly. When you were reading that long list of essentials it went on autopilot a little. Good job

    Back to top
    A Giant Mini Supermarket - Special Interest Story

    Script:

    This may look like the front of a vending machine. In fact, to make a purchase, all you do is dial a code and a robot sales clerk does the rest.

    Instead of just sodas or crackers, this machine offers more than five hundred items - like panty hose, shampoos, lotions, pacifiers, tooth paste, batteries – even dog food. Need to stock up the fridge? No problem. The automatic supermarket stocks all the essentials – eggs, milk, juices, ham, cheese, yogurt, fresh fruit, cake mix, bread, rice, cereal, pasta, a variety of frozen foods, and just about anything else you can think of to complete your shopping list. The automatic store offers almost every luxury you can think of – wine and liquor, cigarettes, even chocolates. About the only thing this store can’t do is carry your grocery bags for you. But the customers don’t seem to mind - and squeezed into just 500 square feet, this curious little shop just may be the convenience store of the future.

    66 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Niki Kernow's recording

    Lists!!! Any feedback gratefully received - thank you! Niki

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7687/script-recording-35329.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Well done, Niki. This was such a pleasure to listen to. Maybe just a bit too fast on that list of essentials...you slurred "pasta"... but that is such a small matter. You did a great job hitting the right words, to distinguish between essentials and luxuries for example, and the tone was so engaging and connected to the message beautifully. Pro quality.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Bill, thank you so much for taking the time to listen and comment. It was a choice to speed up the essentials list to suggest that there were so many items to choose from that I was running out of breath trying to name them all, but unfortunately I didn't get the timing right and it was to the detriment of my diction! It's great to have your ears on the case - I hadn't even noticed the slurring until you pointed it out.

    Peer Feedback:

    That was an amazing read. I could easily imagine what you were describing - oddly somehow in claymation. You just gave me a new target to aim for.

    Thank you!

    Peer Feedback:

    First of all, let me say that I love your voice and your accent, as this read was a pleasure to listen to! I like the way you delivered it whereas it was informative yet amusing and the different style of pacing that you used was a nice touch. What part of the UK are you from?
    Love British programs, as I've been watching Eastenders for 25 years now! Once again, great performance!

    All the best,
    Lenny

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you Josh! I'm glad you liked it, I love the fact you visualized it in claymation - very cool! You've sparked my imagination!

    Hi Lenny, thank you for your kind words. Originally from Cornwall, I now live in Surrey which is not too far from London's East End! I have to admit that I tend to watch American shows, I guess we are always curious as to how others live!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Niki, awesome read! I love your personality and sense of humour!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you Javier, it's nice to know some personality came through all those lists!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Niki,

    I always enjoy your recordings! I love your voice, tone, technique, and accent! I loved how you sped up all of the products, and then sighed after it, well done! You have great acting ability and I can see you booking many jobs! I heard your smile and personality through the whole thing!!

    Always wishing you the very best, Fantastic Job!!!

    Many Blessings,

    Carol

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Niki:

    Looove the accent :) A really pleasant style and delivery, so friendly.
    The ingredients list was very fast, but I understood what you were going for with that. Just slowing the tempo a tad might be a good idea.

    First impression is the mastered levels are pretty darn hot, really jumped out at me. Also, sibilance is a bit sharp and could use a little EQ to calm it down (could just be the volume at which I was monitoring, though). Some very minor plosives, but there were a few. The noise floor is a bit high during the read, with the noise gate working hard to take it out. I also hear some minor slap-back echo on louder passages.

    Back to top
    A Giant Mini Supermarket - Special Interest Story

    Script:

    This may look like the front of a vending machine. In fact, to make a purchase, all you do is dial a code and a robot sales clerk does the rest.

    Instead of just sodas or crackers, this machine offers more than five hundred items - like panty hose, shampoos, lotions, pacifiers, tooth paste, batteries – even dog food. Need to stock up the fridge? No problem. The automatic supermarket stocks all the essentials – eggs, milk, juices, ham, cheese, yogurt, fresh fruit, cake mix, bread, rice, cereal, pasta, a variety of frozen foods, and just about anything else you can think of to complete your shopping list. The automatic store offers almost every luxury you can think of – wine and liquor, cigarettes, even chocolates. About the only thing this store can’t do is carry your grocery bags for you. But the customers don’t seem to mind - and squeezed into just 500 square feet, this curious little shop just may be the convenience store of the future.

    54 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Tonia's recording

    So, I'm dubbing around having fun after today's Saturday technique class. I just banged this out--crap recording quality, very little effort spent on technique--my point is don't waste a lot of your time in a detailed critique. But could a few of you take a listen and just tell me if this sounds conversational and natural (or just lazy!)? Especially in comparison to what you know about my reads?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-31886/script-recording-59232.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This could be a classic lesson in not overthinking. Because sometimes when you get out of your own way, it just flows. This is a good read, very natural sounding and keeps my interest - not selling, just talking. One little thing (and this IS overthinking). I liked the little laugh at the end, but I think one is enough (two would be ok if they weren't so close together). I prefered the second one. It emphasizes the little joke (if you can call it a joke).

    Peer Feedback:

    It was OK. Good read, but it fell a little flat -- perhaps a little more emotion and sell it a little more.

    Peer Feedback:

    Tonia,
    I was listening to this as if I were in the car driving and an advertisement came on. Your tone and conversational manner kept my attention. The clarity of your words and the pacing was fine. It was definitely good; however, I can tell by your gift for interpreting a script and voice quality, you could probably do an even better take.

    Jerome

    Peer Feedback:

    Tonia,
    This is a good read! You were successful at sounding conversational and natural, and you really have a very pleasant voice! I am a fan....it's hard to compare to other reads since your goal was to perform at a quicker pace for your self-improvement, and to sound natural/conversational in the process. You achieved both! Given more time, of course you could have made the read really pop, your previous reads reflect that ability. We all have to find that balance of being natural AND bringing life to the copy, even when we might think it's sounding "lazy".....:)

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks so much for your help, Everyone. Naomi Jacobson's class on "authentic voice" was an eye-opener. I recorded this with little prep and while sitting down, which is unusual for me. I think it ended up with the energy a little low, but with the flow more natural than my usual read, especially with those long lists. I think if I average out everyone's comments, you concur. It's a relief to have my perception of it match how it comes across to others. I agree, too, that the laughs were a little contrived, and that's where I lost the naturalness.

    Again, thanks!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, Tonya,
    I liked your read and thought it flowed very well except for a place in the middle where, as I recall, you were just recovering from the lists. Your energy began to go down for a few seconds and then it picked up again. I know you don't want focus on your recording quality but I'm curious. Was the whirring sound in the background a sound effect? If so, it really sounded like the machine doing its work. If not, well, you might not want to keep it. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, Chris. the whirring sound was the fan in my laptop. Boy, is it loud! Usually I record in my closet with the laptop outside of it on my desk.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for commenting earlier on my clip. I was looking at yours as well, this is my favorite. You sound very natural here and the text breakdown was nice. You are quite a bit further along than I was when I had 16 recordings.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi My Friend!

    I think that you did an Awesome job and sounded very conversational and friendly!! I really enjoyed your recording and wanted to hear more!!

    You have great acting ability, and I heard your smile, Wonderful job!! You did a great job with the list of items, that worked well!!

    Always wishing you the very best my Friend!! : )

    Many Blessings,
    Carol

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    A Haunting title

    Script:

    In this world, there is real evil.
    In the darkest shadows and in the most ordinary places.
    These are the true stories o the innocent and the unimaginable.

    Between the world we see and the things we fear.
    There are doors.
    When they are opened.
    Nightmares become reality.

    107 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear ChasA's recording

    just practicing and getting feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-99389/script-recording-78412.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Audio quality - Lacking, due to either a poor microphone or low sampling rate. There was no depth of sound, and crackling in the background was very evident.

    The read - Very monotonous. I can't say this needs to be over the top, but it drones rather than drawing me in.

    Peer Feedback:

    Are you in SoCal? I ask because you have so many of the issues I'm working on too lol Hard stops at the ends of words, and a lot of glottal closures (in your Ds and Ts)

    Still getting there, but I have trouble believing you were picturing anything behind this. Tell me the story. Make believe you are Robert effin Stack and we are about to go to some weird, real places! You sound less nervous, (well done!) but not enough to be vocally free yet.

    You also had some good juxtapositions of pitch in your delivery, so well done there too. Keep the words fluid, flowing as you say them and the read will become much more enjoyable. For you and us. There's nothing as invigorating as getting a good read in your own voice :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Maybe also connect and smooth out a little more. Voice seems to be a good match for the script.

    Peer Feedback:

    @jeffery, true the gain was down really low and I didn't do a retake, which I should have. I wasn't aware of the noises though, otherwise i surely would have done a retake. My headphones are crap! I went to audio store and tried a couple...i can't believe all I've been missing with my S___ headphones from Target. Due to my budget, this NaVet will have to wait till next month to fix that.

    @bean, naw not in Cali - not since i got out the Navy, except driving my rig thru Donner's Pass! It was a little confusing what was wanted, I mean, I was really thinking a Twilight Zone, Outer Limits, Tales From the Crypt type of thing, but something about what i read in the instructions (or was I confusing a read for something else) so I dropped it in between - which I realize I shouldn't have done. It was a bad day for me and I should have waited till the next day, but i had missed some days and said I NEEDED to get some practice in... I should have waited.

    @CherylLinn... yep, you are so right.
    I appreciate all of you guy's feedback - thanks.

    Peer Feedback:

    To me it sounded a little bit choppy. Maybe it has to do with the pacing, and the words you chose to emphasize, rather than being choppy. I agree it was a little on the monotonous side. Perhaps you were trying for a dark and dramatic tone? I think you can get there pretty easily. Don't overthink it. Just let it flow.

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    100 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Hubert Williams's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3115/script-recording-79070.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    For this read, I'm imagining storytelling. From that perspective, I think your voice and its tone is great for this peace. I'm hearing a repetitive "singing" of some words (evil, shadows, places) and there's not much variation in the sentences. I also hear heavy "S's." Maybe a little more authority and varied "haunting" emotions?

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    112 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear JFDonaldson's recording

    From levels in sound, quality and also script delivery!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-11213/script-recording-78303.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Very pleasing, rich voice. Good recording quality. Didn't run any kind of analysis, but the levels seem ok.

    Obvious that you edited out the breaths, and the breaks (gaps) are clean (filled with room tone?). I don't detect any "gating"

    A little mouth noise here and there - mostly tongue clicks.

    Everything is very articulate, with one glaring exception - "darkest shadows", kind of sticks out like a sore thumb compared to the rest of the read. Fully forming both words with an ever-so-slight glottal pause between would have brought it home.

    The read itself is just a might ponderous, especially in the second stanza. I heard all of the punctuation, plus a few commas you inserted (before the word "and" a couple of times. Thus, the read was a little "ready" and a bit choppy. Just tightening up those gaps (or eliding through them) a little might make it flow more smoothly.

    On the other hand, if this was accompanying a video where the visual sections had to sync up with certain lines, then the choppy quality may be totally appropriate. However, in that case, it may need to "drive" a bit to an end and possibly have a touch more a mystery, wonder and warning quality.

    I'm guessing that this is possibly a promo for a role playing type of video game or maybe a movie trailer or book promo. So I need to be drawn in to the world you're describing. So a bit more compelling energy (that drive) may be in order.

    This is a really nice piece of copy.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good patience in delivery, great timbre of voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    I like the way you read this as a "ready" read; it's clear that you had an image of the video in your head and you were practicing for it. That work does exist, so it's good to be ready for it.

    I felt that the "In" at the beginning was a little awkward; it sounded a little too strong.

    I would also suggest putting a stronger down-tone at the end of "There are doors." just to make it have a little more impact.

    You have an awesome voice, so keep reading!

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice voice, good intonation. I would agree with jamesromick that the gaps are a bit too big. I would prefer a smoother flow and a little more energy to draw me in.

    Peer Feedback:

    Love your voice! You got a bit choppy at the end though. Great job otherwise!

    Back to top
    A Haunting Title

    Script:

    In this world, there is real evil.
    In the darkest shadows and in the most ordinary places.
    These are the true stories o the innocent and the unimaginable.

    Between the world we see and the things we fear.
    There are doors.
    When they are opened.
    Nightmares become reality.

    101 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear psjones's recording

    My apologies to the script writer, I could not resist adding the evil laugh at the end. If this were a real audition I would follow directions precisely. I added the laugh for added "atmosphere". Question to listeners; would this be appropriate for a section of a Narration Demo.(Shortened of course)? Thanks.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-91843/script-recording-80815.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    BTW this is in the edge studio script library as you all probably know, it doesn't say so for some reason.

    Peer Feedback:

    The recording quality sounded pretty nice - no unwanted acoustic noise or background sounds. The music might hide any flaws, but from what I can tell, it seems to flow well.

    You also have a nice, growling voice for this sort of thing. A lot of people try to kind of force that growl to sound intimidating, but yours sounded natural. As far as delivery, it might help if you identify what genre and demographic this is intended for - normally that's displayed above the recording, but like you said, it's not there for some reason. I can hear something like this as, perhaps, the intro to a spooky children's TV show, as there's some levity in your delivery. If the audience is intended to be adult at all, I feel like some of the upturns ("fear" and "reality," for instance) would be a turn-off, as it sounds a bit more cliche. On the whole, it was a pretty nice read - the "most ordinary places" part felt a bit read, like each syllable came out at the same pace - just a few rough or at least uncertain spots to iron out.

    As for demo appropriateness...the script itself sounds intriguing. It just depends on what genre you're intending it for (i.e. audiobook, animation, etc.). Might work well as an audiobook piece. It'll fit better in some genres, worse in others.

    Peer Feedback:

    It's a general rule of thumb to not use Edge scripts on any of your demos.

    As someone who's heard demos (in my research) of people who use them anyway, it just proves you're a newbie who hasn't worked, and the demo is kind of there to trick people into thinking you're employable, so it'd be better to write something new in this style.

    Though I'm not sure if narration is the right demo... maybe like promo narration, but def not audiobook -it's far too short.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks bean, I kinda figured by the way folks chat on here not to use edge scripts for demos, they are good for practice however. I'm not exactly a newbie, but certainly not a seasoned "vet" either by any stretch. I have written my own scripts before but I would get many opinions first before using my own for a demo or part of a demo. Even though edge has 1000s of scripts and I have found other web sites, what sites would you recommend scripts for demos, or hire a writer (which may be costly I'm guessing). You are a great source of information. Please no rush on a response. Thanks.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks James for your input. This read or one like it would be tough to categorize, that's why I needed some other opinions. I could even change it up a bit and make it a commercial for a haunted house. I just enjoy doing character voices. Thanks again.

    Peer Feedback:

    If you're thinking specifically about a narration demo, here are some things to consider.

    Narration demos are generally longer (up to 2 minutes, sometimes longer) and the cuts are generally longer than for a commercial demo - 4 or 5 cuts, more in the 20-30 second range. Why? because whomever is casting or considering you for their narration want to see if you can sustain vocal energy and effectively tell the story or communicate the message of the script (narration script as opposed to commercial copy).

    Study the different styles of narration and their deliveries. Flat and technical. Informational and informative. Up and frivolous. Documentary. Biography. And on and on.

    What are your interests? People (biographies)? Fishing? War? Sports? History? Gardening? Computers? Medicine? Pick subjects that you can relate to, easier to tell the story that way and it'll sound honest.

    Comb magazines dedicated to articles on specific topics and lift a few well written paragraphs - edit them or rewrite them. Even well written news articles or op-ed pieces. (You may need to contact the author or source for permission to use the material, even for a demo.)

    Peer Feedback:

    Yup, what James said, use written copy from non VO sources, or best idea is to just write your own.

    If it's on a website, chances are someone has already used it.

    Peer Feedback:

    James and bean, "sound" advice. I have been writing a few of my own scripts and asking permission to read other published copy from various non VO sites. I like the idea about magazine or news articles (edited). Reading copy about subject matters of interest is a good idea, or read "what you know". I have a medical background, so I could find countless interesting and relevant topics to record. This would open up an endless source of material. Thanks. -PSJ

    Peer Feedback:

    Oh yeah, def sell that medical background in there! Sounds like you're on the right path!

    Back to top
    A Journey to Self-Discovery

    Script:

    Though I grew up in my grandmother’s home, my parents were ever present in the background of my life. They were both ex-offenders, drug addicts, and thoroughly engrossed in criminal activity. I possessed a gut feeling that what my parents were doing wasn’t right but I had no other parents to teach me anything different. Their decisions created the circumstances in which I grew up, shaped my understanding of the world and my place in it. The resulting resentment helped shape my thug demeanor which lead to my embracing gang culture.
    The inner-city neighborhood I grew up in was infested with gangs, pimps, addicts, dealers, and hustlers of all types. It was only a matter of time before I was caught up in the rapture of this culture. My parents, aunts and uncles, siblings and cousins were caught up in the street life as well, so this wasn’t just my environment but it was my very existence. It wasn’t about right or wrong; it was a lifestyle. I had an exceptional training ground and my family was well known and respected so the streets became my playground.
    I had a rap sheet by the age of nine and had been charged with crimes such as assault and strong armed robbery. I was in and out of the King County Youth Detention Center.
    At age thirteen I was facing a charge of murder in the first degree and my probation officer recommended I be charged as an adult. I was convicted as an adult and sentenced to twenty years. My transition from the youth system to prison came with ease. I was conditioned to believe prison was a rite of passage and a badge of honor. I knew I would one day go but not so early in life. I guess you could say I was incarcerated long before my conviction and imprisonment.

    61 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear kzvo's recording

    Note: This is an audition for "Incarcerated Voices". They are seeking volunteer voices, especially afro-american, and hispanic voices, preferably from Michigan. I'm not sure my read is very "believable", but, it could be a way of getting a little real experience. Thanks for listening, and , thanks for your feedback. I did not add this to the Edge library, Not sure of the copyright stuff. Ken

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-66607/script-recording-60719.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This is a very powerful script! The "director's notes" are pretty specific as to what type of voice they're looking for, but like you acknowledged, I'm not sure yours matches any of those in the description. I must admit; however, that I don't know specifically what someone from Michigan sounds like.
    I like your voice a great deal--it's easy to listen to, and this is a smooth read, but I think being "believable" is almost crucial if you're going to be asked to read this script, which is really like a monologue. That, friend, is a real undertaking...especially for a volunteer! Best of luck!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, sglemboski, for your feedback. As far as the director's notes, those are my notes, just to give anyone interested, an idea of what this was for. The client actually replied to my audition. His only comment was about some background noise, asking if I could get rid of that. Frankly, I can't even hear the noise, but, my hearing isn't what it used to be. I think they can use all types of voices, as far as age, gender, and race is concerned, but they have more use for specific types. BTW, the script is just something I picked off of their website, when they asked for a sample of my voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    You sound good but when i realized that your character is a thug, gang person, i no longer believed the read.

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    A Story

    Script:

    Every moment has a story. And every story matters.

    The first men painted stories on stone walls, the ancient Egyptians chose the chisel instead.

    The Incans told story with dances and fire, aborigines told it with star and spear.

    Stories are at the very essence of human life. They count the breaths of every sunrise, the beats of every emotion and the silence of every heart. Stories take the fleeting temporal and makes them eternal.

    86 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear c.r.underhill's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-145236/script-recording-107302.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I really like your voice but don't think the tone you used is the right fit for this read. It sounded ominous and dark. IMO, it should be somewhat upbeat and intriguing.

    The tone you used would be perfect for a Haunted House-type script.

    Peer Feedback:

    In that this script is about an idea that connects humans across centuries, I think a rather epic style read like this makes sense. I did hear a little of the ominous too, but overall liked it very much. My suggestion would be to vary your rate somewhat. It is too steady. Storytellers themselves vary pacing skillfully for various reasons, the biggest being to captivate their audiences. I think your performance starts to sound slightly robotic in the pacing after the first two lines. Good mic technique and clear audio! What mic are you using, if I may ask? Bill A.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you! I am using a Rode NT1-A

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    A Story

    Script:

    A Story
    Every moment has a story. And every story matters

    The first men painted stories on stone walls, the ancient Egyptians chose the chisel instead.

    The Incans told story with dances and fire, aborigines told it with star and spear.

    Stories are at the very essence of human life. They count the breaths of every sunrise, the beats of every emotion and the silence of every heart. Stories take the fleeting temporal and makes them eternal.

    66 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cgracevoiceo's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-101821/script-recording-103784.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice read, soothing, clear and good pace! Nice job!

    Peer Feedback:

    thank you for the feedback @samariassay!

    Back to top
    A Story

    Script:

    Every moment has a story. And every story matters.

    The first men painted stories on stone walls, the ancient Egyptians chose the chisel instead.

    The Incans told story with dances and fire, Aborigines told it with star and spear.

    Stories are at the very essence of human life. They count the breaths of every sunrise, the beats of every emotion and the silence of every heart. Stories take the fleeting temporal and makes them eternal.

    66 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear gthompson1994's recording

    Working on a new recording setup to try to cut down on reverb and hearing the room. Let me know how well it is working!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-141910/script-recording-103155.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like it. It is so clear and your voice goes well with this script.

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm assuming that this is a RAW recording - no processing?

    If so, the quality is pretty good. Still a little room echo.

    Did you cover the floor and ceiling? Is there open space behind you?

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice and clear

    Back to top

    79 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jerry lino's recording

    Any and all comments welcomed and appreciated

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3696/script-recording-90026.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Ain't your first rodeo, is it Jerry.
    Looking forward to you imparting some of your knowledge to those trying to learn the biz.

    Having said that, the "Esses" have a hissing quality. Like the pop screen is not doing it's job. The pacing is good. Voice quality, ya, it's there. Recording quality is good as well.

    Peer Feedback:

    Timing and tone were really nice. it was very conversational which is what I work on in my reads. I am hearing a slight " sibilance" on the S's so you might work on that.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the comments. This was an earlier recording and I hear the ssss's as well. I think my recording quality has improved a bit since then. As for the conversational aspect of my reads I'm sorry to say that it just seems to come naturally to me. LOL I guess years of talking to myself helped. I've scored quite a bit of work over the last decade and I'm on a couple of different talent agencies rosters in LA as well as NYC. It's still not an easy business. You still have to cross your fingers and send out those auditions on the regular if you expect to get ahead. And practice practice practice. Always keep your instrument fine tuned. Thanks again for the comments. Every bit helps.

    Back to top
    A Story

    Script:

    Every moment has a story. And every story matters
    The first men painted stories on stone walls, the ancient Egyptians chose the chisel instead.

    The Incans told story with dances and fire, aborigines told it with star and spear.
    Stories are at the very essence of human life. They count the breaths of every sunrise, the beats of every emotion and the silence of every heart. Stories take the fleeting temporal and makes them eternal.

    12 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lesjr27's recording

    There were a lot of pauses in this copy, so interested to see what you think about my tone, speed, and post-production work. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-171407/script-recording-108624.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Dear Lsjr27,

    I enjoyed your practice recording. Your voice tone is resonant, clear and easy to listen to.

    Word inflection was good with the exception of rushing 'aborigines' a bit.
    Overall performance and recording quality were excellent.

    M..R. Duvall

    Peer Feedback:

    Dear Lsjr27,

    Good sound quality to your recording. The tempo and enunciation were wonderful. Careful with over emphasizing "Every". It was a very enjoyable read.

    A. Michael

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    Abiogenic Theory

    Script:

    The abiogenic theory holds that hydrocarbons were a component of the material that formed the earth, through accretion of solids, some 4.5 million years ago. With increasing heat, liquids and gases were liberated, and because they were less dense than the rocks, buoyancy forces drove them upward. In favorable conditions, the upward journey from the regions of origin would be dammed temporarily in porous rocks at depths that our drills can reach, and from which we then derive commercial petroleuml

    87 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear adraeger's recording

    I need to record a new demo. Before I do, David recommended that I submit a few practice auditions on this site. Grateful for your detailed feedback on both performance and recording quality.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-94086/script-recording-78724.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Mr A , clearly you've been doing this for while or you're an extrermely talented newbie :} Your interpretation and performance were wonderful . You did add the word internal between the words increasing and heat . Also there was a mid to high frequency tone in your recording

    Peer Feedback:

    The background noise is so loud that I couldn't focus on your performance at all. Try to at least run your recording through some noise filters first. Even then, I think that noise is so loud that it would effect the voice itself even if you were to take it out digitally.

    Some suggestions I have would be:

    Record in a closet
    Make sure your computer is not in the same room as your mic.
    Use some bed sheets and jackets to clog the surroundings to reduce echo.
    Learn how to use the noise removal function in audacity at the very least.

    GL!

    Peer Feedback:

    To John Wang: thanks for your comment, but I am a bit puzzled. I don't hear any background noise myself, I do record in a closet surrounded by packers' blankets, and use a decent microphone. Can you suggest what the problem might be?

    Back to top

    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear eliehershfield's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/abiogenic theory.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The recording quality seemed okay. Your read lacked emotion and on a longer read I think you would lose the audience. You just seem to be reading the words that are there and it should be more like telling someone about this really cool information. Obviously the material doesn't support a super uplifting approach but there needs to be more life to it. Imaging you live for this stuff and someone has asked you to explain it and see if you can't come up with a different approach. You will also want to practice at editing out your breath sounds. They seemed to occur in good removable places (not in the middle of a sentence) so it will be easy enough to cut them out.

    Peer Feedback:

    Yeah, I have to agree with Daniel. There is a disconnect here. I hear a lot of words with very good deliberate diction, but I'm missing the story. And I'm not sure how you feel or relate to it either. Granted, it's pretty dry copy. But there are quite a lot of descriptive phrases to paint a picture with the bottom line of "this is where oil comes from."

    Peer Feedback:

    The music really doesn't fit the material. You're also mastered to -0.2db. That's twice as loud as you should be. Cut back to -3db to be in line with all the VO websites and the general practice on the forums here. I agree about the reader disconnect.

    Peer Feedback:

    TxTom

    How do I control the volume as you indicate? Is it a setting in Audacity?

    Elie

    Peer Feedback:

    Under the effects menu, use Normalize and set it for -3db. That will change the volume unlaterally down until your peaks are at -3db.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks!

    Back to top
    Abiogenic Theory

    Script:

    The abiogenic theory holds that hydrocarbons were a component of the material that formed the earth, through accretion of solids, some 4.5 billion years ago. With increasing internal heat, liquids and gases were liberated, and because they were less dense than the rocks, buoyancy forces drove them upward. In favorable conditions, the upward journey from the regions of origin would be dammed temporarily in porous rocks at depths that our drills can reach, and from which we then derive commercial petroleum.

    37 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear eliehershfield's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-16403/script-recording-56255.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    A clinical read. Voice with some clarity and good diction. Might be a bit too clinical or disinterested. My opinion.

    The recording quality is terrible. No other way to put it. It's over-modulated throughout and distorted. You are pegging the meters at 3.2db which is 6db higher than should be. VO tracks should be max at -3db, just so you know. You clipped 262 in this short read. That is 262 samples of distorted sound. Re-normalizing won't fix the distortion, it would just reduce the clipping...but the distortion will remain. You probably need to check your levels before recording. This sounds like the original is distorted.

    Peer Feedback:

    The audio quality was too distorted to be able to critique the performance.

    Back to top
    Abiogenic Theory

    Script:

    The abiogenic theory holds that hydrocarbons were a component of the material that formed the earth, through accretion of solids, some 4.5 billion years ago. With increasing internal heat, liquids and gases were liberated, and because they were less dense than the rocks, buoyancy forces drove them upward. In favorable conditions, the upward journey from the regions of origin would be dammed temporarily in porous rocks at depths that our drills can reach, and from which we then derive commercial petroleum.

    114 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Hubert Williams's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3115/script-recording-79126.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello - I hear a lot of sound bouncing around in your room, do you have any accoustic treatment? Also your pronunciation was hard to make out, try and be aware of that. You have a great voice and could listen to it all day

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Mike. You have a very strong soothing voice, powerful, but it makes me feel safe. Your articulation needs tightening. Try doing some tongue twisters, and then do them with a cork in your mouth. This forces you to overpronounce and gets your mouth into the habit. You will look ridiculous, but it's a great exercise :)

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with the others. Your voice is great! If you work on your articulation, you could be the "go-to guy" for truck commercials.

    Back to top

    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Jeff Hoffman's recording

    Thanks as always! Jeff

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Abiogenic Theory 1.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, Jeff. I thought this was definitely a good read. You have a way of talking about a (for lack of a better word) boring topic without making it boring for the listener. Try to watch falling off at at the end of your sentences or before commas ("reach," "petroleum," etc.).

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback Sarah!
    Very good point!!
    Jeff

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Bill
    Thanks for the suggestion. Makes a ton of sense to me...
    Thanks again!!!
    Best
    Jeff

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Sarah. Nice job, Jeff. Your tone, clarity and articulation all sound just right to me. I wonder if you could deliver this at a slightly faster rate? Larry suggested this for an E-Learning piece I recorded with the point that listeners to such a recording would have specialized knowledge of the subject and could handle the faster rate. Could be wrong; I'm certainly not the director for this. ;-)

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    Action Against Hunger - Siham

    Script:

    Siham's mother fled famine-stricken Somalia when she was pregnant with Siham, developing severe anemia in a Kenyan refugee camp. Fortunately, Action Against Hunger's lifesaving support helped her recover before delivering her beautiful, healthy daughter, Siham. Siham is now thriving in pre-school and we've even trained her mother to be an advocate for other pregnant and nursing mothers in the camp.

    29 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear el.j.regan's recording

    I'm more concerned with performance feedback, but I am curious about the recording quality of my studio-in-progress. Thank you in advance for your all your help!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-16765/script-recording-48438.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    El I liked your voice, pacing and emotion. It sounded like you weren't sure about the pronunciation of Siham as you said it differently every time. When you said 'helped her recover' it seemed a bit rushed. I'm not too good when it comes to talking about audio equipment but I can hear a slight hum on the recording. Best.

    Peer Feedback:

    Awesome Arlen, thank you for your feedback! I'll look into that hum (that's exactly the kind of audio feedback I was looking for! I'm not super savvy about audio equipment either). And even if I'm not comfortable with a name, I don't want that to show! So I'll work on pronunciation and consistency too. Thank you for christening my first submission with its first feedback.

    Back to top

    97 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Fajita's recording

    Feedback on the quality of the recording, as well as the performance. How's the tone and pacing of the read? Thanks in advance!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-121946/script-recording-94099.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Fajita,

    Good diction but some what slow in execution, practice, practice, practice!

    Peer Feedback:

    This is waaaaayyyyy to slow! Slowing things down does not make the subject more interesting or sound more cultured. You need to connect with the script.You are painting a picture and you need to take us on the journey. I lost interest after the first sentence. Sorry to be so brutal!
    The sound quality was good but there was some mouth noise throughout the recording.
    Keep practicing!
    Please remember that this is only my opinion.

    Peer Feedback:

    Agree with raithrovers1, much too slow.

    You're - be - ing - ve - ry - de - li - ber - ate - in - how - you - are - rea - ding - the - words.

    Do - you - nor - mal - ly - talk - that - way - in - re - al - life - ?

    Also very sing-songy.

    Recording quality is a bit muffled with some reflection from hard surfaces. You may be working too close to the mic - some plosive popping

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    Alacola Valley

    Script:

    Water.
    Clear, fresh and life-giving to the crops of the Alacola Valley.
    Rushing ever onward to the sea.
    The waters of the Minset River visit this lush valley to replenish the soil and color the land. Yellow citrus,
    green vegetables,
    Blueberries
    and ruby-red fruit checkerboard the landscape in brilliant hues.
    Farmers, who have tended this land for generations move from field to field inspecting the size,
    calculating weight
    and measuring progress.
    Progress is slow.
    But only with time can the flavors of the Alacola Valley reach perfection.
    The possibility of an early frost and the consequence of even three extra days of rain weighs heavily on the minds of the caretakers.
    But today is glorious and worry will wait until tomorrow.

    76 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear teresalumini's recording

    Learning Documentary Narration. This is my second time trying it out to practice story telling. Let me know what you think! Pls ignore sounds quality and background noise

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-137296/script-recording-104210.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Very clear and concise. I also enjoyed the kind of reverence your tone had for this river. It's an amazing river that you are showing respect. Very nice. I also liked the more awe - filled tone of bits in the second read. I think, my opinion obviously, that there could stand to be a bit more awe. This river is so important, just LOOK at how much it affects the world around it! It's a delicate balance for sure. Don't want to tire out the audience over the length of the documentary.

    My only other critique is that a few words lose strength and falter a bit. Our voices must be strong like river!

    Anyways, great read overall! Keep it up!

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    Alaska Wilderness

    Script:

    Deep in the Alaska wilderness, Atz Lee, his brother Nikos, his father Atz Sr, and his wife Bonnie, race against the dropping temperatures to construct the roof for Atz Lee’s new cabin.
    With Otto soon to be taken out of action, the family must step up and fill the void. Otto’s son Ivan, and nephew Atz Lee, make the treacherous 30 mile journey across the marshland to resupply.

    59 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear j_jereb's recording

    For homework with voice coach, I am trying to find the right tension for a life-on-the-frontier documentary. I appreciate your input.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-120205/script-recording-97234.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you could slow down a bit, that would make it more dramatic.

    "race against the dropping temperatures..." Action!

    "treacherous 30 mile journey..." Danger!

    I'm picturing a Discovery Channel or Nat Geo type show with lots of tension and dramatic music.

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    Albert Einstein

    Script:

    Albert Einstein was a genius, and one of the greatest physicists of all time. His famous “Theories of Relativity” which describe the relationship between mass and energy, and between space and time, were published in 1905 and 1916. Einstein was born of Jewish parents in Ulm, Germany. He spent many years in Switzerland, becoming a Swiss Citizen in 1901, and gaining his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1905 from Zürich University. It was while employed as a patent clerk in Berne that he published his first “Theory of Relativity”. This contained his famous equation: E=mc2, which explains the relationship between mass and energy.

    58 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cgracevoiceo's recording

    Should I slow down or is it okay? and anything else? Thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-101821/script-recording-103808.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Speed sounds okay, may need to check your sibilance, "S"s are a little hard. You have a really soothing voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    thank you for the feedback! @rpbrevard i'm being mindful of the sibilance "s" now.

    Back to top
    Ambassadors of Hope and Opportunity

    Script:

    Just north of San Francisco lies Marin County, which is often regarded as one of the wealthiest in the country. Despite the affluence, there is still a vulnerable population of young people often being overlooked. Homeless young adults are off the grid. They're not being counted in the census or by any single Marin County agency.
    They don't have cell phones, they don't have a mailing address, they don't have email.
    They don't have driver's licenses or cars. They're sleeping on friends' couches, camped out in the hills above Gerstle Park, sleeping in parked cars and who knows where else.
    Doing everything they can to remain hidden.

    73 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear CaseyBeland's recording

    First time uploading anything

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-158518/script-recording-106679.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Casey!

    Your voice and speech are clear and I didn't hear any problems with the recording quality. I would try asking yourself what the purpose of this text is. Who are you talking to, and what do you want them to do? Right now, it sounds a bit emotionally light/nonchalant for the content. Try it with a slower pace, and focus on the message. Good luck!

    Best,
    Diana

    Peer Feedback:

    Great read,

    Voice and annunciation on point. 1. Who are you speaking to? 2. What are you speaking about? And 3. Where and who are you? Starting there will set how you should sound, role and emphasis you should use to communicate your message.

    Good luck,
    CT

    Back to top
    Ambassadors of Hope and Opportunity

    Script:

    Just north of San Francisco lies Marin County, which is often regarded as one of the wealthiest in the country. Despite the affluence, there is still a vulnerable population of young people often being overlooked. Homeless young adults are off the grid. They're not being counted in the census or by any single Marin County agency.
    They don't have cell phones, they don't have a mailing address, they don't have email.
    They don't have driver's licenses or cars. They're sleeping on friends' couches, camped out in the hills above Gerstle Park, sleeping in parked cars and who knows where else.
    Doing everything they can to remain hidden.

    109 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear danielmarrin's recording

    I've been out of the game for nearly 2 years now, just restarting voiceover practice. Any constructive advice on method/technique, baby-step ideas for getting back is welcome. Operating from my apartment and not able to afford much in terms of new tech, so simple ideas for improving sound quality would be awesome too.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-82503/script-recording-78489.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Don't you hate when you get all kinds of plays and no comments?! I do.

    I think it's a bit dry. I have no clue what you're attempting to do with this. Is it politically motivated, social reformation, locally addressing a problem... I'm just not sure what your objective is because the emotion doesn't guide me. But pretty much everything else was good.

    Just gotta share that intention.

    Peer Feedback:

    Really like the tone of your voice and I could feel that what you were saying was important. I like your pacing in the first portion of the read. It gave your voice the right amount of emotion. Starting with They don't have cell phones, I thought you were a little fast in your pacing. This has a PSA feel to it so don't rush thru the importance of your message. You got a little lazy with the word wealthiest, the t at the end was missing for the most part ( something I struggle with ).

    I have been working on improving the sound in my space as well and posted a comment what I have done so far to bean420 in some feedback she gave me on a recording I submitted ( thanks bean) :) maybe some of that can be helpful.

    Great Voice !
    Keep it up!

    Back to top
    America's Money Vault

    Script:

    Whether it’s cash, gold, or digital bits, we all know that money makes the world go round. And what that money is worth depends on trust. Trust that the engines that power it all won’t fail. For the first time, National Geographic is going to take you inside the system. Places that you’re not allowed to bring a camera – straight into the vaults of the world’s largest stash of what you want, need, and bust your butt to get – money. One of the places that truly controls money is the central bank of the United States – the Federal Reserve. They count it, store it, move it, inflate it, deflate it, destroy, stabilize, lend and buy it…and make a profit off of it. But above all, they protect it.

    105 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear digitalwiz42's recording

    I'm getting back into VO after about a year's hiatus. So I suspect I have a lot to relearn. My laptop has a moderately noisy fan. I don't hear it, but I'm wondering if anyone else does.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-93524/script-recording-90524.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Good voice, good recording quality, although I can hear the fan, but only very faintly on headphones in the pauses between sentences. Not a huge problem, and easily removed electronically. Your read did sound a bit like you were just reading the copy. I'm not a coach, so I can't give you very specific instructions as to how to make it more natural, other than studying the copy and try to imagine speaking it to a friend. Perhaps a little bit more variation in pacing for emphasis. Sometimes pacing is is as much or more expressive than changes in pitch or volume. My observations are worth every penny you paid for them. :-) just a first impression of one listener. You have great potential. Best of luck.

    Peer Feedback:

    I don't hear the fan so much as extraneous breathing noises.

    Right from the top: There was a little noise, but it sounded to me like a two-part thing - a rustle of clothes and an inhale through your nose with a slight lip smack.

    There were a few other places that I heard the same inhale - after "wants", after the first "money", after "Federal Reserve" and a double-clutch breath after "stabilize" (maybe an editing thing). Of course, some of those things could be surgically edited out, and probably would be for this kind of narration. If you watch NatGeo programs (or any other documentary-type programs for that matter), I would defy you to point out a single breath sound in the narrations.

    You also have a problem similar to one that I have. I call it "a wet mouth." Most people suffer from a lack of hydration which creates lots of mouth noise, but, if anything, my mouth is overly filled with saliva - I sometimes have to have a paper towel handy to dab out my mouth as I record, especially audiobooks. I read from my tablet and I'm constantly wiping away the spittle spray. Performing on the live stage, I got my fellow performers pretty wet at times.

    But "wet mouth" also gets in the way of garbling some words. The biggest example in this read is, "straight into the vaults of the world’s largest stash of what you want..." That line would probably require a re-take. Another instance was, "destroy." Also, watch things like "whuhchoo" for "what you" (just a little bugaboo I adopted from my high school choir director).

    There are also some extraneous pops and mouth clicks here and there - again, some can be surgically edited out.

    The recording quality is generally very good - fairly clean, clear and not overly processed. It sounds like you. Jump back into the pool.

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow that script's a little bit of a rough choice with a heckuva list there but you certainly didn't struggle or anything.

    I feel like the script needs a little more of a tone in your read. You didn't feel monotone but it felt a little too much like you were just delivering info.

    For instance "For the first time" it's a landmark event. There should be a little bit of buildup to it in the preceding lines so that you pull us in. We may not have cared about this before the commercial but you can suck us in and make this feel like something big, important and special. Then we'll tune in.

    There's a bit of a humor to the script as well. "What you want, need, and bust your butt to get – money." I feel like a little bit more needed to be put into the playfulness of the read.

    Peer Feedback:

    I imagine this spot to have much more promo energy. This reminds me of this pre-commercial teaser for History Channel's "Modern Marvels" or something....
    faster pace, build a little more excitement, and hold the viewer through the commercials.

    "Now - 'Money' - on Modern Marvels"....

    hope that helps,
    DS.

    Back to top
    America's Money Vault

    Script:

    Whether it’s cash, gold, or digital bits, we all know that money makes the world go round. And what that money is worth depends on trust. Trust that the engines that power it all won’t fail. For the first time, National Geographic is going to take you inside the system. Places that you’re not allowed to bring a camera – straight into the vaults of the world’s largest stash of what you want, need, and bust your butt to get – money. One of the places that truly controls money is the central bank of the United States – the Federal Reserve. They count it, store it, move it, inflate it, deflate it, destroy, stabilize, lend and buy it…and make a profit off of it. But above all, they protect it.

    37 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear eliehershfield's recording

    I transcribed this from an actual documentary.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/america's money vault.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I haven't seen this documentary, so I may be way out of bounds here.

    This is just a little ponderous and slow. There are some good variations in the delivery, but listen to when you get to every period. It's the same trailing off ( downward inflection) and same pitch.

    There could also be a little sense of urgency and/or excitement. Words like "trust....engines that power it all....For the first time....want, need and bust your butt to get...." This should be exciting viewing!

    That looooong list is a mother, ain't it?

    Peer Feedback:

    Always try to keep in mind that when you are recording you need to maintain a quicker pace. The slower delivery as James points out becomes ponderous. You may feel you are going too fast but the end recording will sound much more normal.

    Back to top
    America's Money Vault

    Script:

    Whether it’s cash, gold, or digital bits, we all know that money makes the world go round. And what that money is worth depends on trust. Trust that the engines that power it all won’t fail. For the first time, National Geographic is going to take you inside the system. Places that you’re not allowed to bring a camera – straight into the vaults of the world’s largest stash of what you want, need, and bust your butt to get – money. One of the places that truly controls money is the central bank of the United States – the Federal Reserve. They count it, store it, move it, inflate it, deflate it, destroy, stabilize, lend and buy it…and make a profit off of it. But above all, they protect it.

    103 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear McDoogle's recording

    This is my first time back on the VO scene in quite a while, so I'm eager to hear your feedback! Don't hold back, nitpick everything you can; I want to get better, so I want to hear everything that I can improve.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6430/script-recording-76050.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi jmm878! What a nice resonance there is to your voice. You spoke very clearly and articulately, but I felt like the pace was too slow and there were too many dramatic pauses. I felt read-to at a very stilted pace. Try to envision a friend that you're talking to so that it feels more personal. And then sound more excited about this incredible look we'll get to have inside the Federal Reserve. The recording quality sounded fine - no back ground noise and no mouth noises (something I struggle with!)

    Hope that's helpful!
    ~Laura

    Peer Feedback:

    Overall, I think it was acceptable. However, do keep these things in mind (granted this is just my opinion):

    1. Your delivery is very choppy. You don't need all those pauses. For instance, listen to the first two sentences: "Whether it’s cash,PAUSE gold,PAUSE or digital bits,PAUSE we all know that money PAUSE makes the world go round. And what that money is worth PAUSE depends on trust. Trust PAUSE . . ." These are exceptionally long pauses which are unnecessary, misplaced, and makes the listener have to pay too much attention to follow what you're saying. In your case, try to read the paragraph normally, as you would explain it to a friend. It's best if you visualize and decide who you are talking to.

    2. Your voice comes off as strict, in my opinion. This might be because you are trying to make your voice lower than your comfortable range. I identify with this problem, as I kind of wish I had a bass voice and try to record sometimes as if I did. But neither of us have that. So don't try to do it. Because again, it comes off as harsh and newcastery. Think about what tone you want to have.

    3. "and bust your butt to get – money. One of the places that truly controls money" The first time you say "money", listen to how the word dies off (again, maybe because you're trying to go too low). Now listen to the second time you say money in the very next sentence. You see how much better that sounds? It's because its the middle of the sentence, so you're getting ready for the rest of the sentence, you're following through. The first time, you just let it drop off, you weren't following through.

    4. "They count it, store it, move it, inflate it, deflate it, destroy, stabilize, lend and buy it" - Again, way too long, partly because of the pauses, and partly because of the fact that it's a long list that you have to make interesting which is challenging. Color each item differently and don't take so long. The point I think is that they do so much with it - I don't care exactly what they do with it. The effect of the sentence being long is that it makes me say "I get it, they do lot's of stuff". So breeze through that.

    Please email me - josh@bloombergvo.com

    Peer Feedback:

    Josh pretty much said it.

    For my sensibilities, this sounds like you're reading. There are vocal inflections, but there's a missing connection to the material, and thus a missing connection to and for the listener.

    Peer Feedback:

    I felt very uncomfortable listening to this. I don't know if it was the choppiness or the fact that you seemed to sound unsure of your own delivery. Sorry to be so negative but this one just didn't do it for me.

    Back to top
    America's Money Vault

    Script:

    America's Money Vault
    Whether it’s cash, gold, or digital bits, we all know that money makes the world go round. And what that money is worth depends on trust. Trust that the engines that power it all won’t fail. For the first time, National Geographic is going to take you inside the system. Places that you’re not allowed to bring a camera – straight into the vaults of the world’s largest stash of what you want, need, and bust your butt to get – money. One of the places that truly controls money is the central bank of the United States – the Federal Reserve. They count it, store it, move it, inflate it, deflate it, destroy, stabilize, lend and buy it…and make a profit off of it. But above all, they protect it.

    65 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear leliarebecca's recording

    This is my first recording!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-158582/script-recording-107498.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, nice job here. You have a great clarity to your voice and also in your pacing. I would suggest playing around with a more conversational tone as an alternative. For example, consider picturing or pretending that you are sharing this privileged information with a close friend or confidante. This acting exercise could add a whole new layer of trustworthiness and a more overall authentic quality to your read. It could also help you experiment with more varied pitch and tone. Best of luck!

    Peer Feedback:

    HI,

    To reinforce the previous post, try to ensure that the high point of your phrases, and the endings of your phrases, are not always on the same pitch. You're doing good, this is just one thing that I'm sure your coach will get you to work on - I have to watch out for this myself. I normal conversation (if you're not reading - and recording), we tend to use more variety in our inflections and pacing.

    You're recording also has some noise in it. you'll need to figure out how to get rid of it - preferably sooner than later so it's not holding you back. If you're not sure how, get a studio evaluation done. It's all fixable - you can do it!

    Peer Feedback:

    You have a nice vocal quality but as indicated above we need more personality in your read. The next step would be breaking down the script into individual thoughts and thinking about how you might say them in a natural conversation.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi there.
    Welcome to the biz!
    I like your voice. No criticisms today other than you should love it and train every by auditioning, find a great coach, and within a year set up a nice recording space and get a decent mic ($250 or more). Then, look forward to hearing yourself on some paid work!

    cheers!
    Dave S.

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    American Film Institute (Take 2)

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    90 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Robert Fairbairn's recording

    After some good advice, I've slowed down the pace a little bit.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6325/script-recording-23104.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Doh! I noticed that I read "close-up" as "close-ups". This is why we do practice sessions.

    Peer Feedback:

    Doh! Minor quibble! Slowed down, this is a really nice read. I'm not sure of the music bed...it sounded more mysterious than this piece might call for, but musical tastes vary for so very many reasons. Others might like the bed you put here.

    You do have a very pleasant voice for this kind of read. Right in the same neighborhood as Bill A. Nice company indeed.

    I look forward to more of your reads. I think I can learn from your very at-ease style.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you, Tom. That's very incouraging feedback. I'm still quite new at all this so am still experimenting with a variety of styles.

    Peer Feedback:

    Great job! I definitely think the slowdown was a great and necessary change. That being said, I think you sacrificed emotion in your attempt to reduce speed. The read feels a little flat and dry; try to spruce more excitement about the subject into your readings while maintaining the pace you currently have. Also, remember not to let your volume get out of hand when you add more excitement (this is advice for if you take my suggestion, not the current take); that's a common problem.

    The audio quality was pretty good also. No complaints there.

    Peer Feedback:

    I like this read very much, including the bed. The tone and pacing, to me is right on. Well done

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    American Film Institute

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    82 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Amina93's recording

    Did I get the right tone for a documentary read? Should it be more energetic? Or maybe more "soothing"/smooth and rich? How about my pronunciation? (the word "particularly" sounds kind of garbled to me). Thanks for your input, it's much appreciated :)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-97230/script-recording-86822.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    You didn't ask for recording quality, but you're recording is really soft. Had to turn up the volume to listen to it on my headset.

    The delivery is a touch brisk, which may be one of the reasons that "particularly" might have been a stumbling block for you. You got it though.

    Are you seeing the images of this narrative in your mind? The silent films with the ttttttttt of the camera? The broad gesturing of what we now-a-days would call "over acting"? A close up of a stunning face? Images of patients in an insane asylum? Etc.?

    The reason for asking is this: You read really well. But that's what it sounded like - reading. I didn't feel a personal connection or being drawn into the world of film and it's window on the human condition.

    Peer Feedback:

    You definitely need to slow down here. Think about what you are saying and why you are saying it as you are saying it instead of just being a conduit for words to pass from a page to a mic.

    Your voice sounds great and James already covered the production issues.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback, I'll keep working at it!

    Peer Feedback:

    You could slow down a bit. Also, it sounds to me like you are simply reading the text. It doesn't sound like you are bored, but are you genuinely interested in what you are reading? You need to sound as interested in the topic as you want your listener to feel. Hopefully you want them to feel really interested so they will stay around and listen to all you have to tell them.

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    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Beverly Ann's recording

    I'm trying to slow myself down and make it sound real.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/American Film Institute for feedback forum.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    A little quick for documentary. You could afford to slow it down a bit so that the ideas have time to land for the listener (even as it might be accompanied by video). From my point of view, this is one of those scripts that's more informational in nature than one that offers an opinionated point of view. Conversational, yes. But still a bit detatched. Give me the information (in a friendly way) and let me make up my own mind about how I feel about it. But give me time to process that information.

    Peer Feedback:

    If this were a documentary, you definitely rushed the delivery. Almost every read of this has been toward a documentary/video ideal. Funny thing is: it's from a book or essay called Dionysus in Literature. Totally acceptable to deliver as an audiobook.

    Peer Feedback:

    You and I have the same problem...we need to slow down. I know it's easier said than done. Get the breathing under control and relax...that's what I'm working on anyway & it seems to be helping. I like your voice, it's easy to listen to. Your voice is good and clear!

    Recording audio sounds a little fuzzy. Is that something you could handle with a little noise reduction in your recording software?

    Really nice overall though!

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    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Brian C. Topping's recording

    I am trying to apply the recommendations of being natural and confident. I am also interested in comments on tempo. Thanks for any feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2061/script-recording-31994.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    BT - as far as your tempo it is perfect in some places and just need to slow down just a whisker in others. You sound natural and your voice fits the copy. Your mood is perfect throughout

    Peer Feedback:

    Great comfortable read and I love the quality of your voice. I do agree with the speed at some points, other than that, I thought it was great.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for the feedback. I greatly appreciate your support and specific feedback about speed!

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    27 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Brian C. Topping's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2061/script-recording-31996.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I've always enjoyed your reads and find you to be tough competition in the narration genre. You have a relaxed and authentic sound here too which sounds awesome. But I am a bit distracted by a couple plosive pops and the way you edited out breaths, shortening the natural pauses between sentences a bit too much. Very subtle and easy-to-fix issues. You have a terrific delivery.

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice delivery, but just a LITTLE too quick for my tastes...Like it overall though.

    Peer Feedback:

    Bill and Tom, many thanks for your support and feedback. I appreciate the insight as it helps me make some progress at a comfortable pace. I still consider myself a first semester freshman at this with a long way to go. Much to learn and apply!

    Peer Feedback:

    Very clear voice here, I think your voice and delivery would go a long way in comfort for an audience.

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    American Film Institute

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    49 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Robert Fairbairn's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6325/script-recording-23091.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    So.....what's the rush?

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey,
    This is the first recording I've heard from you and I really like your vocal quality. You've got a great instrument there. I'd suggest you slow your pacing about 50% and repost.

    Peer Feedback:

    Very good advice. I'm uploading take two now, this time at a slower pace.

    Back to top
    American Film Institute

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    78 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear JasonArnold's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-118023/script-recording-93957.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Good voice, good diction, good recording quality.

    In my personal opinion it sounded like it was something being read. I think it was a bit too fast, and could have used some variation in tempo and an occasional pause for emphasis.I think the old but useful trick of imagining you are talking with a friend and discussing the subject instead of reading a statement would probably help.

    Bottom line: Slow down, vary the pace, and try to deliver in a more conversational form.

    Great start. Great potential. Just need a bit more work on interpretation, Jason.

    Steve

    Peer Feedback:

    Agree with sspeheger. It is rushed, and sounds like it's just being read rather quickly, somewhat disconnected from the subject.

    Do you see the images in your mind's eye? Can you call up a scene from something like "Reaper Madness" or "Silence of the Lambs" as an example of how Hollywood treated the subject on film? What are the salient points this passage is trying to put forth? Not sure that "conversational" is what is necessarily needed, but there has to be a personal connection (emotional, POV, bias, illustrative) that can relate to the listener.

    There is some reflective room reverberation in the recording, maybe some bounce-back from hard surfaces. No ambient room fuzz or electronic noise. Further deadening your recording environment is needed. And some mouth noise and clicking.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree, I didn't feel an engagement with the material, rather that it was a bit clinical.

    I also agree that I like both your voice and your enunciation, and it was easy to understand and follow.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback everyone! I'm trying to not have too much 'acting' in the pieces but I guess I went too far and took out all of the life. :)

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    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Jeff Hoffman's recording

    Can't wait for my fist class In a week but until then working with the handbook... Trying out a documentary read... AND still working on the neutral American sound... Thanks for the help!!!! Jeff

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-17894/script-recording-50693.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Good work Jeff... nice clear diction, good tone... seemed a little dry though... try to show images with your words... I find hand gestures while reading helps me and comes across in the take. Looking forward to future submissions! :)

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Alyx regarding your diction and tone. As for conveying word images, try thinking of and/or finding a beginning, middle, and end in this script. Have fun in your first class!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Alyx and Joe
    Great suggestions!!

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    29 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jothi20@gmail.com's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7200/script-recording-35211.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think you need to connect the sounds more so that your sentences flow. There is a choppiness in this delivery. Work on smoothing it out! Love that accent of yours.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Bill. I will work on connecting the sounds and make the sentences flow.

    Peer Feedback:

    Some good stuff here...but I agree with Bill - you need to work on the flow...and your editing skills. Regarding phrasing, breathing at commas is usually safe...but be careful about taking a breath in the middle of a thought...it must make sense. You might consider editing out some of the bigger breaths...and be careful to be consistent with the background sound. The break between "human behavior" and "with every nuance" is very pronounced. I loved your choice of music. I think I recognize it...but can't place it....

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Jothi,
    You've got too many recordings under your belt to be sounding this amateurish. You need to slow down and concentrate on quality. I know we haven't heard from you in a while but it would be nice to see you spend more time on each script. Don't post it after you record it. Wait a couple of days then listen to it again an see if you still like it. Look for what doesn't sound right and correct it. Polish your reads. That's where your growth will spring from.

    Peer Feedback:

    Jothi: I have to agree with the previous comments. This was very choppy sounding to me. It hit hard on the opening words and then trailed off.... It didn't keep my interest as I was wondering where the script was going. I looked at doing this same script myself last week. There is no shame in looking at how others have performed this same script in the past. You have a nice voice and nice accent, but I think you need to focus more on the exactness of the script to bring out the true emotion and intent of the story. Keep at it. Larry

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Mary, Hi Ricurd,

    Mary, thank you for your insightful observations on flow and editing. I appreciate it. I will work on it.
    Richurd, I am very glad to that you took the time to listen. Your advise is sound as always.
    I have some issues with my equipment. My hiatus was due that reason. The technical issues that I haven't yet solved results in underlying tension which in turn is reflected in the delivery, the poor quality of editing, and lack of polish that Mary and you have observed.
    I have a noisy environment. I try to counter it by using PortaBooth professional. It doesn't work in my recording environment. I use either the Yeti Pro or the Samson G Trac condenser microphone. I sometimes use the Samson stand with a shock mount & pop filter . I use Audacity. The output is excellent with the ambient noise. When I remove the ambient noise, quality goes out of the window.
    I have not been able to figure out a way of generating a good clean output with these set of equipments in my environment. Maybe I have to think of a booth or some such solution.
    I will keep trying till I work that out.
    Thanks again Bill, Mary, Ricurd.

    Regards
    Jothi

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Larry. I will work on your comments specifically, "you need to focus more on the exactness of the script to bring out the true emotion and intent of the story."

    Regards
    Jothi

    Back to top

    56 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! This is a new, slower version, of the AFI text. I tried to imagine that I was speaking to a group of students who are studying film. Did it work? All comments are most welcome, thanks! Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-29445.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Scotty!!!!

    That's it, my man! It's amazing what those little pauses can do. My favorite part is "most hidden side of our being" in the last line. It sounds incredibly human and thoughtful. Very well done!

    John

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice, throw a little background in and I think you have a keeper

    Peer Feedback:

    That's a beauty Scott! nice work on the noise problem and your voice is so smooth on this one. Very nicely done, a great read

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks you guys for the encouragement. I will have to run it by one of the coaches and see if they think that it is too choppy, or just right!

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    The coach said it was not choppy! I am happy!

    Thanks for all of your help.

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Scott, I thought the performance was nicely done; Nat Geo/History2 style is what came to mind. What kind of noise reduction are you using? Between pauses it's silent, but when speaking you could hear a bit of that "room" sound in the background.

    -JohnZ

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello John,

    Thanks for the encouragement. As for the room noise I am using the expander on a Focusrite VoiceMaster Platinum. I know that it is not perfect and shortly hope to solve the problem with a different mic.

    Will post something new in about a month with the new set-up. Would appreciate your feedback when I do get a better solution to the noise issue.

    Thanks!

    Scott

    Back to top
    American Film Institute

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    54 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    OK! I have reposted this. Is it an improvement? Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-29405.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice job, Scott!
    Recording Quality:
    Overall, the recording is clean and free of hum/buzz/room noise. The recording sounds a little muddy to my ears, so you might want to inject a little high end (treble) into the mix to brighten it up a bit and add a little clarity, especially to the "S" sounds which are a little flat.

    Performance:
    Generally speaking, the performance is good. Meaning there are no glaring errors in pronunciation, annunciation or inflection. You have a very good sense of where your natural pitch should be. Pacing is pretty good, although, you could add a bit of a longer pause at the commas. One thing I think this read could benefit from is a little more emotion. I get the sense when I listen to this that you're reading it to read it and it sounds good, but you're not actually conveying the meaning of the words to the listener.

    One trick I use is before I record a script for a narration, I do a quick read through and mentally picture what might be on the screen over my narration. This can really help determine tempo and pause length, tone and inflection. In this case, I picture old, grainy, fast moving silent film footage of humans interacting, and towards the end of the script, images of crazy people...possibly from movies from different eras (Cuckoos Nest, Clockwork Orange, etc). Using this tip can help make the read sound less clinical, and more narrative.

    Hope this helps. Keep up the good work!

    John

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello John,

    Thanks for the input, encouragement and suggestions. I will try to implement them!

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Scott,

    I definitely like the 2nd attempt much better...more inflection & more emotion. However, the pauses and overall tempo are still bothering me a bit.

    Here's a youtube link to a piece about the universe narrated by Mike Rowe:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8eNy1w9y5Q

    While there are obviously some very long pauses where the focus is on the visuals, I really like his pacing. It's has emotion and inflection, but it also is very controlled and deliberate. I think the piece from :31-:40 illustrates what I'm talking about.

    John

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Scott,

    I enjoyed this and as I've said before, you've got a great voice for these types of scripts.
    The performance was very good, nice pitch and pace and the delivery was neutral yet interesting to hold an audience attention.

    Well done!

    Best of luck, LCW.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Scott! Your voice and innate delivery style seem appropriate for this kind of script. The challenge of this script, I think, is that the narrator must convey information in a script that is not really informational at all...not REALLY. There are many opportunities for you to take advantage of the emotion references in the copy. I would try more script woodshedding and see what you come up with. With your voice, this could really come alive!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello!

    Thanks again for the feedback, encouragement and suggestions. I was searching the internet yesterday to see if I could find the original narration. Thanks so much! I learn a lot from them.

    One reason that the pauses have been so short is that I have been critiqued earlier for being too choppy!

    To my mind this text is not, "normal conversational" text. Therefore, it has been difficult for me to get a hold of it.

    Will keep working on it..

    Thanks to everyone!

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    I thought it was a very good read. The room or booth sounded very boomy.

    Back to top
    American Film Institute

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    60 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Skamfer's recording

    In this script I worked on flow (shorter pauses) and more flatness to my read compared to previous submissions. I would like feedback on technique mostly here. This is not a processed recording as the one I "finalized" did not produce the best result. I am awaiting feedback from George Whittam for my voice and equipment but in the meantime am leaving this "raw" for your comments. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-115636/script-recording-91138.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think the pacing wasn't bad. But I think you over-enunciated in several spots, and "controlled flow" came out more like "control-full". Maybe just color it up with a little enthusiasm. Although the script refers to the "clinical" aspect of film, you're still wanting to make the listener interested.

    Peer Feedback:

    Agree with Moe about the over-articulation.

    It somehow sounds unnatural and practiced and deliberate as opposed to (say it with me) "conversational".

    You also get a little sing-songy and work the words too hard with so much inflection. Again, it sounds studied rather than organic.

    Just tell me the story.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for these. The articulation is a big one for me. I speak that way in everyday conversation so toning it down is a huge challenge. Onward!

    Back to top

    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Patrick Kamler's recording

    Looking more for recording quality than anything else. I have a studio at my work and I'm testing it out. This was a cold read; I just picked a script and went for it. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/American Gothic VO.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Patrick,

    I thought the recording quality was fine. Also, you have a great sounding voice that will work well for several different genres. Not bad for a cold read!

    Peer Feedback:

    The sound quality is OK but I do detect a slight hum in the background and a slight echo of the voice. A noise filter would probably clean that up.

    E

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback! The room I'm in is kinda treated but not entirely, as the hum in the background is probably my teammate's noisy pc fan :) I will treat the space right near the mic and try it again. Thanks!

    Peer Feedback:

    Well done!...for a cold read. No tongue tied there.

    Back to top

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Al Urkawich's recording

    OK.....2nd try....going for the un-announcer read. This is hard for me to do!!!!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10257/script-recording-30976.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Ok...I'm going to see if I've heard what IDs you as 'announcery'...

    When I listen to this attempt...better and not AS announcery...I'm hearing a familiar inflection pattern which, to me, sounds unconversational. What I hear are the inflections during and then at the end of your phrasing within sentences. You seem to up, up, up and then down at the end.

    For example:"He dressed his sister in a simple frock (up): a white collar held close around her neck(up) by a broach (up). The dentist he outfitted in overalls, a band collar shirt (up) buttoned tight around the throat (up) and a dark business jacket (down)."

    I think it's that pattern of delivery that sets yours apart with others who have done the radio biz in the past. I could be WRONG....but sue me...you get what you pay for. LOL

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Tom...for the in depth analysis. I hear ya!

    I'll try doing this again after I give it some thought.....I am working hard at this....its like trying to break a wild horse!!! But I know if I can beat this...it'll help!

    Thanks again.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Al,
    This read is so much better...more natural and conversational. You slip back into the announcer sound periodically but it's toned down this time.

    I've recently tried something I heard about on The Voiceover Cafe podcast where Beau Weaver was explaining how he, a former LA radio jock, learned to shed his announcer/radio delivery and learn to become a voice actor. Among other things, he decided NOT to wear headphones while performing a voice over. The explanation makes a lot of sense if you come from a radio background.

    Check it out: http://epodcastnetwork.com/l-a-based-movie-trailer-and-tv-promo-voice-ov...

    Keep up the good work.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Thanks Bill
    I will check that out. & yes....I usually don't wear the headphones while recording. I know that can get you into a bad habit. However, you can't beat phones for listening to the playback and finding mistakes! Another thing that I try to do is stop mouth noises....the clicks and pops you make while talking. The old advice about room temp water helps! I was listening to a dentist on the radio hawk his practice and the mouth clicks he had in his unedited commercial drove me nuts!!
    OK....I think I can beat the announcer thing and will keep at it and will post something else soon.

    Peer Feedback:

    I've gotten to the point where mouth clicks and noises creep me out. I can only thank my venture into VO for that!

    Back to top

    37 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Al Urkawich's recording

    Thought I'd make this attempt.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10257/script-recording-30947.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow! Can't complain. Your voice is clear. The pacing is perfect for the piece with the inflection appropriate as well. If there is such a thing as a "documentary" voice, you certainly have it, Al. Great job all around with the music, too. It's not too soft or overbearing.

    Peer Feedback:

    What a warm, engaging voice you have, Al. The delivery sounds announcer-ish to me because it is so well-supported and smooth. Too much so, perhaps. It may be counter-intuitive, but I think you need to work on sounding less smooth and more natural. As do most of us with announcing backgrounds.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for being honest Bill!
    Yup...been fighting that "announcer" read for a long time!
    ...will work on it!

    Peer Feedback:

    Al,
    I understand that "Announcer" voice thing. But I really liked it. If I were the PD I'd air it.
    Joe

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Joe

    I might give it another try!

    Peer Feedback:

    Yep...announcer al came to the mike here. Your pace was good, but the tone was like Bill said, too announcery...and to me, announcery steps back from a personal delivery. A personal delivery makes the listener feel like they're being spoken to one-to-one. The guy who did the VO on Seabisquit and the Ken Burns films has that tone down like a patented product. The aim is the 'talking to your best friend' sound...elusive, but definitely not as if you're selling life insurance or something.

    Your voice is so very clear....we need to get that announcer to take a coffee break and talk to us like we're at the break room table with him instead of at the mic.

    Peer Feedback:

    Man, I think Tom is auditioning for a job with Edge. His critiques are gold...so thoughtful, honest, and on the mark. You've really developed sharp ears over the past year, Tom. I appreciate your generosity on this forum.

    Peer Feedback:

    LOL Thanks Bill...listening to everyone helps me a lot.

    Peer Feedback:

    I gave it another shot, trying for an un-announcer read. Its tough!!!

    Back to top
    American Gothic

    Script:

    In 1930, an Iowa artist named Grant Wood asked his sister and his dentist
    to pose for a painting, a tribute to the rough rural stock of America.

    He dressed her in a simple frock with a white collar held close around her neck by a broach.
    He outfitted the dentist in overalls, a band collar shirt buttoned tight around the throat,
    and a dark suit jacket.

    He posed the couple, stiff as a board, in front of a plain house. The man is transformed into a Midwestern farmer, who grips a pichfork, and stares straight ahead.
    The woman looks away.

    The painting, "American Gothic," became one of the most enduring images of the decade
    an icon of the spirit that survived the hard times of "The Depression."

    45 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    Maybe documentary is my thing. I'm getting the most I can from my Samson USB. No editing.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-26343.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    What a great stentorian voice you have. Loads of character. Your flow is nice and natural.
    If you were me I would work on increasing your dynamic range with each sentence. You sound a bit monotonous. When you practice, over exaggerate your pitch changes. It will sound and feel artificial at first, but listen back and see if you hear an increase in enthusiasm or energy in your voice. You don't have to be louder, just vary your pitch. Listen back to this recording and see if you can hear that your sentences all have a similar rhythm. Play around and see if you can vary them. Vocal exercises, like singing, can help your voice become more flexible, and those variations will feel less forced to you.
    As far as the recording, I noticed some mouth sounds that should be edited out.
    Cheers!
    Deb

    Peer Feedback:

    Recording Quality - some mouth sounds - too much moisture in the mouth. I on the other hand am dry and make too many pops and clicks. :)
    Vocal performance - it was read too slowly, your tempo needs to be more upbeat, and add more dynamic range as well. Your voice is very loud and powerful so you have to find scripts that are suitable for that type of voice or find a way to speak softly, turn it down when necassary. Your voice has drama...sounds like the voice of God to me.

    Peer Feedback:

    Since you mentioned the USB mic, I thought this would be as good a place as any for this link about USB mics.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/149123/review_usb_microphones.html

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you. Comments well received and to the point. My voice needs work.

    Back to top

    24 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    Reworking it!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-26386.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Henry, I thought it was a very good performance, but would have liked for you to have read it just a little slower. You have such a unique voice! It is geared for these types of scripts. Have you ever thought about doing Narration for theatre? As I think, you would be excellent for it. Best of luck.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks lcw115. Try to listen to the old-time radio drama performers. They produced real life while standing at the mike, working from the page. Great voice artists!

    Back to top
    American Gothic

    Script:

    In 1930, an Iowa artist named Grant Wood asked his sister and his dentist to pose for a painting; a tribute to the tough rural stock of America.
    He dressed his sister in a simple frock: a white collar held close around her neck by a broach. The dentist he outfitted in overalls, a band collar shirt buttoned tight around the throat and a dark business jacket.
    He posed the couple, board-stiff in front of a plain house.
    The man, transformed by art into a Midwestern farmer, grips a pitchfork and stares straight ahead. The woman looks away.
    The resulting painting, called American Gothic, became one of the most enduring images of the decade, an icon of the spirit that survived the hard times of the Depression.

    41 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Joe Cirillo's recording

    Hi All, I saw this copy and just had to try my hand at it, Hope you like it. Joe

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-11382/script-recording-30868.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    my last comment, didn't seem to stop going in.

    Peer Feedback:

    Really like your voice quality on a narrative piece like this, Joe. Good pacing and clarity. Work on the storytelling. It sounds like your reading rather than storytelling to me. Keep up the good work.

    Back to top
    American Gothic

    Script:

    In 1930, an Iowa artist named Grant Wood asked his sister and his dentist to pose for a painting; a tribute to the tough rural stock of America.
    He dressed his sister in a simple frock: a white collar held close around her neck by a broach. The dentist he outfitted in overalls, a band collar shirt buttoned tight around the throat and a dark business jacket.
    He posed the couple, board-stiff in front of a plain house.
    The man, transformed by art into a Midwestern farmer, grips a pitchfork and stares straight ahead. The woman looks away.
    The resulting painting, called American Gothic, became one of the most enduring images of the decade, an icon of the spirit that survived the hard times of the Depression.

    74 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Keli O's recording

    My first time uploading a recording for feedback. I’m just getting started practicing, and recording straight to my iPhone since I don’t have any recording equipment. So I apologize in advance for any inferior recording quality. I appreciate any comments and feedback. Thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-169660/script-recording-108055.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Keli.

    My two cents worth, from the viewpoint of a fellow newbie!

    I think your voice gives itself really well to the expression of the script. It rises and falls nicely so as to avoid being boring or monotone, but I think that the lack of a microphone means that your voice appears a little overbearing, simply because you have to compensate where you can for the lack of equipment. I don't think it fair to judge recording quality too harshly, as your feedback request said you don't have recording equipment.

    All I will say is that the hisses and pops would be reduced massively be the use of a pop filter (only a few dollars), and your voice, which varies nicely in tone, will sounds even better through a purpose built external microphone.

    I'm sure more experienced users will have much more useful feedback than I, but I really wanted to say well done and keep going!

    Back to top
    American Teacher

    Script:

    The debate about public education has never been louder. There are dozens of theories out there about what works and what doesn’t. We’ve experimented with charter schools, test standards, class size, curricula and technology. It turns out that most people agree that a teacher is the most important in-school factor to a child’s success. And yet the teaching profession has never been less respected and less understood.

    79 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear adraeger's recording

    I would be grateful for your comments on recording quality. In the past listeners have noticed a lot of background noise, which I hope is less now, or absent. I recorded in a closet, surrounded by clothes and cardboard boxes. Equipment : Rode NT1-A mic, Centrance MicPortPro, Audacity.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-94086/script-recording-83642.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think the audio quality as far as background noise and such is very good. My ears wouldn't be able to distinguish your audio here from somebody in a Whisper Room.That being said, I would recommend some time working on breathing and editing out breath and mouth noises.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the helpful comments, BrianG

    Peer Feedback:

    Cloth, especially cottons and wools, are more sound absorbent than paper or cardboard. Cardboard can be a pretty reflective surface.

    There is still a titch of hollow noise underlying the recording. Some of that might be eliminated through a noise reduction plugin - Audacity has a pretty effective one built in. Do you know what your noise floor is? What levels are you initially recording at then normalizing to? The NT1-A is a pretty sensitive mic.

    It also sounds like you're pretty close to the mic. Lots of mouth noise (clicks) and errant breath sounds (like the exasperated sound after your slate).

    The read is rather dull and passionless. This could be one of those election year political wedge issue ads, or some narrative put out by the NEA, so there has to be some kind of POV to influence the listener to buy into this particular cause/issue.

    Peer Feedback:

    I think your background noise is definitely minimal, so congrats on your progress with that annoying issue. I agree with James about the mouth noises and such. I have a problem with clicking, and I use Izotope's Rx declicker/decrackler and LOVE it. It has saved me loads in editing time. It's pretty pricey, but they have sales often. Your read is a bit dry, but, for me, your vocal quality is wonderful. I think I could sit and listen to you read the stock quotes to me and be enthralled. Your voice makes me feel like I'm sitting near a roaring fire in some cottage somewhere cozily listening while you smoke a pipe and regale me with stories. :)

    Peer Feedback:

    Heatherly : Wow! Thanks for your very kind remarks, do you have a particular cottage in mind? And also thanks for the Izotope tip.

    Peer Feedback:

    Perhaps more and more 'intense' up/down inflections.

    Peer Feedback:

    Oh, some lovely hidden cottage that I stumble upon after getting lost wandering the Moors...I've read too much Bronte :) As a side note, your voice is amazingly similar to Roy Dotrice, the actor who did the Game of Thrones audio series. I don't know what your area of interest is, but you could make a killing in audiobooks. You should check out ACX.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the tip Heatherly, I think I will give audiobooks a try.

    Back to top

    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Chris Coulter's recording

    I'm aware that there is still an awful clunk at the end of this recording just as I'm about to turn off the machine. I moved very slowly and gently to try to prevent it but it's still there and without editing software I don't know how to lessen or get rid of it. If anyone has suggestions I'd appreciate hearing them. Thanks for your patience.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/American-teacher.MP3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi! Chris. I don't think your relaxed and laid back style of reading worked in this case. I feel this should have been read in the style of a news reporter leading in to an interview on the subject matter. On the 3rd sentence, you clearly ran out of breath by the time you got to the end. I've heard this on some of your previous posts so this is something you may have to work on. Best.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Chris, you have a good voice for this kind of script. Reminds me of one of my teachers in 9th grade. Unfortunately it did not sound natural enough and sounded like you were reading the script for the first time. In addition, you were running out of breath at "technology". I have the same issues sometimes. Check out this link for a breathing exercise: http://www.voiceover-talent.com/VoiceoverExercises.htm

    Good luck!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Arlen and Michael, for your comments. Michael, I especially appreciate the link to the breathing exercises and more exercises that will be of help to me. I've saved the inflection and articulation exercises as well as the breathing ones.

    Back to top
    American Teacher

    Script:

    The debate about public education has never been louder. There are dozen of theories out there about what works and what doesn’t. We’ve experimented with charter schools, test standards, class size, curricula and technology. It turns out that most people agree that a teacher is the most important in-school factor to a child’s success. And yet the teaching profession has never been less respected and less understood.

    46 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cryssken's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-138835/script-recording-101784.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    it was good I like your voice some words seemed not punched, If that makes sense.
    I am not an expert but you do have a calming voice!

    Back to top
    American Teacher

    Script:

    The debate about public education has never been louder. There are dozen of theories out there about what works and what doesn’t. We’ve experimented with charter schools, test standards, class size, curricula and technology. It turns out that most people agree that a teacher is the most important in-school factor to a child’s success. And yet the teaching profession has never been less respected and less understood.

    80 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear leliarebecca's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-158582/script-recording-108541.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Very clear delivery, well paced. It came across like a news reading, may want to choose the appropriate words to inflect so the listeners knows what points you are emphasizing.

    Peer Feedback:

    Great Read,

    excellent sound quality

    Good use of an authoritative tone, you could afford to pick up the pace a little, but feels very measured and it isn't overly slow.

    Peer Feedback:

    Aside from a couple of pauses, the pacing is good overall. I would say that, since this read is meant to be about something that is a great concern for people, really lean into that with your tone. This might be odd to say, but you could try delivering the read as though you are holding back how upset you are with how educators are not respected.

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    American Teachers

    Script:

    The debate about public education has never been louder. There are dozen of theories out there about what works and what doesn’t. We’ve experimented with charter schools, test standards, class size, curricula and technology.

    52 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jmarie's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-1658/script-recording-51775.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice and ability to read all seem to be there. Better equipment would definitely enhance your read and bring out the quality of your voice.

    Back to top

    118 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear David@dkvoiceservice.com's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113302/script-recording-93602.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Performance wise - It sounds as if you're disconnected from the subject matter. There's a kind of rhythmic pattern as you "read" the words, which makes it sound like you're reading words rather than painting "word pictures" for the listener. And over the course of long form copy, it will get tedious for the listener and they will loose interest.

    Take the first sentence:

    "Once upon a time in America, there was a Classic Feudal System, not unlike those built around the castles of Europe, where serf and slaves existed to serve a Noble Aristocracy and protect a grand lifestyle."

    What are the main points to emphasize? The first thing I heard was "was". But you've already set up a look into the past with "Once upon a time...". That first sentence is loaded with information and image descriptions.

    So this is "Story Time" - "Once upon a time in America..." - but adult story time, not "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" children's story time.

    Assuming that this is a kind of A&E or NatGeo type documentary, there will be visuals. Can you picture them in your mind? Do you see the grandeur of the Plantation setting of the Old South? What is the POV or bias built into the story (into the copy). What do you think the copy writer (author) thinks about likening the lifestyle of the American Southern Plantation System to the Feudal System of Europe? Pro or
    Con? Why does the writer quote Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities"? (Presumably, we've all read it, so we know the reference is to the classicism and turmoil of the French Revolution.)

    This "story" is what one casting director I know calls, "Front Loaded." All of this sets the stage for what follows - information, visuals, attitude, emotional content, POV, etc.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with the word "disconnected". I never really felt the images coming through. The pace of the read was, I thought, very good. Just need to focus more on the images rather than the words. That's something I'm trying to work on myself.

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    Anaconda - Low Volume Read

    Script:

    Anaconda
    Giant snakes have a reputation of being aggressive. The anaconda measures over 16 feet and weighs 180 pounds. Its mouth is like a clamp and an animal struggling to get free only sets the grip tighter. At the same time it sets its bite, the anaconda loops its powerful coils around its victim and begins to squeeze. The process takes little more than a second, hardly enough time to react.

    57 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear sterng66's recording

    My Voice Over Coach wanted me to practice an intense, low volume, commanding style read. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks for your feedback!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-118662/script-recording-102319.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The low volume is clear and easy to listen to. You do have a commanding style but the inflection didn't make me hear "intensity". The recording quality was fine assuming the inhales and S's will be edited out.

    Peer Feedback:

    This is not a "low volume" read.

    Think David Attenborough.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUm7siIj4h4

    He nearly whispers at times when he's narrating his nature documentaries. It's what is sometimes referred to as a "hushed intensity."

    Talk like you don't want the snake to hear you. Because if it did. it may squeeze the life out of you and swallow you hole.

    Back to top
    Anaconda

    Script:

    Giant snakes have a reputation of being aggressive. The anaconda measures over 16 feet and weighs 180 pounds. Its mouth is like a clamp and an animal struggling to get free only sets the grip tighter. At the same time it sets its bite, the anaconda loops its powerful coils around its victim and begins to squeeze. The process takes little more than a second, hardly enough time to react.

    82 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear 7heodoros's recording

    I am in a self made Vocal booth. What do you think about the sound quality.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-144073/script-recording-102047.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I think the sound quality is stupendous!

    Peer Feedback:

    The sound quality is very good indeed.

    Back to top
    Anaconda

    Script:

    Anaconda
    Giant snakes have a reputation of being aggressive. The anaconda measures over 16 feet and weighs 180 pounds. Its mouth is like a clamp and an animal struggling to get free only sets the grip tighter. At the same time it sets its bite, the anaconda loops its powerful coils around its victim and begins to squeeze. The process takes little more than a second, hardly enough time to react.

    53 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cgracevoiceo's recording

    Take 2. following everyone's feedback on the first take I added more emotion behind it and tried to speed it up a bit this time. better? thanks all. :)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-101821/script-recording-103842.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi CGrace,

    You have very good enunciation, your voice is also pleasant. It's hard when starting out in v/o not to sound like you are reading the text. I still have to work hard at it. I guess you have to imagine your describing the anaconda to a class of eager students on the edge of their seats leaning on every word of your story. Keep it up!

    Peer Feedback:

    Great job with this read! Everything was clear and I was able to hear some of that emotion. Even though I did not hear the initial recording, I can say that I did not get bored during the read, and your read kept me interested throughout.

    One possible suggestion would be to try this script and purposely add more emotion than you think you need to in order to get a better sense of what may be too much emotion. Comparing it to a take that may be too monotone may give you a better sense of what you don't want, and can help you find that right balance of excitement/emotion you need in this read.

    Overall, excellent work, and I wish you the best!

    Peer Feedback:

    thank you very much @marysboy1 and @sterlingCage! I will implement your suggestions in my practice.

    Back to top
    Anaconda

    Script:

    Anaconda
    Giant snakes have a reputation of being aggressive. The anaconda measures over 16 feet and weighs 180 pounds. Its mouth is like a clamp and an animal struggling to get free only sets the grip tighter. At the same time it sets its bite, the anaconda loops its powerful coils around its victim and begins to squeeze. The process takes little more than a second, hardly enough time to react.

    59 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cgracevoiceo's recording

    Continuing to practice. any feedback much appreciated, thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-101821/script-recording-103810.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your diction is great; your tone seemed appropriately serious for the material, but perhaps a bit too monotone. There were a couple choppy moments - between "being" and "aggressive" & "weighs" and "180 lbs."

    Peer Feedback:

    The recording is very clear and I agree with other comments about the monotone. This almost seems like something that needs some more emotion behind it. Maybe not I am new if your goal was just baseline narration you hit it but I am not sure if that is what you wanted or not. All in all, I think it was good!

    Peer Feedback:

    I'd speed up a little bit and really focus on emoting, like the others said. Push the emotion to the maximum. I mean, it's insane! This thing can be up ti SIXTEEN FEET long! And HOW much does it weight?! Really marvel at it, and make that amazement shine through in your read.

    Peer Feedback:

    hi everyone, thank you so much for all your feedback! i am going to do and upload another take of this script with all of the feedback in mind, to improve the read. I received some coaching on this and have been listening to documentaries just like this (including a female reading about Anaconda's in Venezuela) and i have noticed that as I am listening to the voice actors, for the most part, it seems to read these types pretty baseline. However, i can hear the monotone in my read and I will give it with a bit more emotion behind it and just see how that comes off. for this read does seem to make sense to give it some more emotion while still keeping it serious. thank you!

    Peer Feedback:

    Great read! Clear voic. The only criticism I have would be to maybe speed up the pace and speak with more emotion. Great job!

    Back to top
    Anaconda

    Script:

    Giant snakes have a reputation of being aggressive. The anaconda measures over 16 feet and weighs 180 pounds. Its mouth is like a clamp and an animal struggling to get free only sets the grip tighter. At the same time it sets its bite, the anaconda loops its powerful coils around its victim and begins to squeeze. The process takes little more than a second, hardly enough time to react.

    26 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Miranda's recording

    Hi again I've shifted my "studio" (lol, a shelf!!!) and put some foam and fabric around it to try to address some of the echo/room noise. I still hear some hiss...

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-57367/script-recording-59354.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Recording quality: Aside from the hiss, which you've have correctly identified and need to deal with before working professionally, your recording was also very quiet. That's easily dealt with, but I'd imagine the hiss will become even more of a problem. At a guess, I'd say the hiss is being caused by whatever interface you're using to plug your microphone into your PC. Try swapping that out with another.

    Performance: Good, but a little too sales-y for a documentary-type script, particularly at 0:15 "only sets the grip tighter". You have a nice voice for this sort of thing though. Keep it up!

    Peer Feedback:

    Like accent. I felt you were a tab rushed and could have put more feeling into your read. But I still liked it.

    Peer Feedback:

    I LOVED it! I hear the hiss and had to crank my headphones up, but the spot that sounded a little cheery to me didn't sound that way this time, and I liked how you colored phrases subtly by changing your pacing. I think it could have more feeling in it, too, but I also think it's great for documentary and would depend on the feel of the rest of the show and what the director wanted (distant narrator versus one more excited and dramatic).

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    Ancient Computer

    Script:

    In 1900, a storm blew a boatload of sponge divers off course and forced them to take shelter by the tiny Mediterranean island of Antikythera.

    Diving the next day, they discovered a 2,000 year-old Greek shipwreck. Among the ship's cargo they hauled up was an unimpressive green lump of corroded bronze. Rusted remnants of gear wheels could be seen on its surface, suggesting some kind of intricate mechanism.

    The first X-ray studies confirmed that idea, but how it worked and what it was for puzzled scientists for decades. Recently, hi-tech imaging has revealed the extraordinary truth: this unique clockwork machine was the world's first computer.

    An array of 30 intricate bronze gear wheels, originally housed in a shoebox-size wooden case, was designed to predict the dates of lunar and solar eclipses, track the Moon's subtle motions through the sky, and calculate the dates of significant events such as the Olympic Games.

    No device of comparable technological sophistication is known from anywhere in the world for at least another 1,000 years.

    So who was the genius inventor behind it? And what happened to the advanced astronomical and engineering knowledge of its makers?

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MHeyden's recording

    All comments appreciated!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10833/script-recording-53618.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice voice, and overall a good read. If you're producing things out of the home you will eventually need to learn (if you don't already know, that is) how to remove your breaths from the pauses. There were only a couple of times where I felt you had not planned your breaths or perhaps were cold reading and didn't comprehend the sentence before recording it. The most obvious example of this is "The first X-ray studies confirmed that idea". The flow of that sentence isn't as natural as the rest of your read.

    This is a really neat discovery, and your delivery is a bit "I'm reading this". This is something I have been working on myself, so I'm perhaps more sensitive to it than others might be. What has been working for me is to read it through once or twice on my own, to get the overall feel of it prior to reading. Plan your dynamics, too. Voiceover is very musical in its rhythms and pitch variations. Decide before the read where you are going to ebb and flow with the dynamics, and you'll have a fantastic read on your hands!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Mike - thanks for your feedback. I actually did edit out a lot of the breaths, but got a bit bored with the editing and decided to let several of them go. Of course, if this were a read for a real job, I would have been far more diligent. Yes, you are right - the variations in pitch and inflection should ebb and flow. I was struggling a bit with being a story teller and yet trying to have an intellectual feel to it. Thanks for your feedback. Much appreciated. I learn something from each critique!

    Peer Feedback:

    Your delivery kept the topic interesting and I thought you delivered awesome diction!

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice read but flubbed Antikythera
    Reference:
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Antikythera?s=t
    Otherwise nice work.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Estaton and Richurd. I must confess - I had no idea how to pronounce Antikythera and was too damn lazy to look it up! You guys are too pro for me - I need to start doing my homework!!

    Peer Feedback:

    Nit-picking.
    Don't need to punch "off course" - "forced" is a more operative word. What did the x-ray studies do? They "confirmed" that idea. Laying out "world's first computer" was terrific! Try "woo(d)n" instead of "wood-den". Three real deep, real audible breaths in that sentence. You could have edited them out, but that might have created a little tention with the listener because the sentence is so long. Sometimes, using good mic technique, you can pull away from the mic for an instant as you take the breath so that it isn't quite so noticable. Harder than it sounds, but I've seen pros do it very effectively. The "1000 years" sentence may have been laid out (slowed and stressed) just a tad more. Let that sink in. [PAUSE] Ask the questions.

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    Antarctica

    Script:

    Far to the South lies a land of dazzling snow fields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically carved
    ice mountains, soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness.

    There are no human sounds in this land of primeval beauty; only the wild cries
    of birds, seals, and whales ... echoing across a vast expanse of land and sea.

    37 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-26721.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Copy interpretation - too choppy too many pauses.
    Vocal Performance - Did you intend to sound so dramatic? Your voice is very strong and the read felt strange to me. I heard a read that reminded me of Dark Shadows or Vincent Price....something dark. Change your tempo and lighten up that strong voice.
    I like your voice. You have the "voice of God" sound.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Henry, you are getting better each time. With something like this, you might also try to show us that these things are wondrous! Far to the south...you almost whisper... lies a land of... dazzling snowfields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically carved
    ice mountains... soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness.

    Look at all the adjectives, Soaring, Crystaline, dazzling, Without going over the top, if you open the vowel just a touch on those adjectives and draw attention to them, it opens up the wonder a little. Sooaring, Daazling, it takes some practice to do it so you don't sound overdramatic.

    Good job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Sabrina thinks I am overdramatic. You get the drift, Nodo. This is drama. I can easily open it up. I gave it a taste on "echoing." The strangeness she hears is intentional.
    She might also hear vacancy and desolation, my intention. I wasn't born with this voice.
    I stuttered, like James Earl Jones. Now I can give you almost anything you ask for.
    But I can easily go over the top. I don't mean to sound like God, but I love words!
    I'll work this up. Many thanks.

    Back to top
    Antarctica

    Script:

    Far to the south lies a land of dazzling snow fields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically
    carved ice mountains, soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness.

    There are no human sounds in this land of primeval beauty; only the wild cries of birds, seals,
    and whales ... echoing across a vast expanse of land and sea.

    37 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-27112.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Henry,

    This was very nice! The flow and the pacing were good and you described the elements very well. Good job!

    Also wanted to ask you, were you a Radio Actor or did you do Films as well? If so, which ones? As I would love to see, or possible hear some of your performances.

    Best of luck, LCW.

    Peer Feedback:

    I did work in stage, radio, film as a young man. I was in Manhattan in 1955. The only film you can definitely see me in is "The Cardinal," filmed in Boston in 1963. I had a tiny
    speaking part and joined SAG.
    But I made my career as a civil engineer and construction superintendent. I was able to keep my hand in acting for regional theatres, and in working backstage at the opera,
    while I was studying singing. I alway wonder if I should have stuck it out, but a good
    paying job always wins out. The only reason I can pursue VO work is that my voice
    is still strong. But it doesn't come easy anymore! Thanks for asking. Go for it!

    Back to top
    Antarctica

    Script:

    Far to the south lies a land of dazzling snow fields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically carved ice mountains soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness. There are no human sounds in this land of primeval beauty, only the wild cries of birds, seals, and whales echoing across a vast expanse of land and sea. Experience the wonders and grandeur of a land where few have ever set foot as we discover the world’s last frontier -- the great White Continent. This special voyage takes place during the austral summer, when the weather is best, temperatures are moderate, and days are long. Penguin chicks are hatching and it is common to see elephant seals along the beaches.

    44 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear shiromi's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3103/script-recording-37636.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Great Job. Tone was great. You kept your voice exciting. Most importantly you made Anatartica come to life with the emphasis in certain words.

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice was crystal clear. Keep up the good work.

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice read...good pace..clear delivery.

    Peer Feedback:

    A lot of mouth noise. This felt read. It's an advertisement for a cruise to the Antarctica and was a print ad at that. But for a tourism spot like this one, you're trying to entice people to take the trip...not observe video as one would for a documentary.

    Peer Feedback:

    Agreed with the above comment -- back off the mic a bit, or approach it off axis, to see if that will get rid of some of the mouth noise.

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    Antarctica

    Script:

    Far to the south lies a land of dazzling snow fields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically carved ice mountains soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness. There are no human sounds in this land of primeval beauty, only the wild cries of birds, seals, and whales echoing across a vast expanse of land and sea. Experience the wonders and grandeur of a land where few have ever set foot as we discover the world’s last frontier -- the great White Continent. This special voyage takes place during the austral summer, when the weather is best, temperatures are moderate, and days are long. Penguin chicks are hatching and it is common to see elephant seals along the beaches.

    70 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Skamfer's recording

    Experimenting with recording quality in home studio set-up. This is a new attempt at quieting background noise. Also, first submission in Documentary category which I really enjoy.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-115636/script-recording-90948.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey there, I like your voice. It's quite chipper but perhaps too upbeat to represent the stark and desolate landscape of Antarctica.

    Pace is good, but you have the same problem that I do, and that's breaking apart your line and having spacing where there shouldn't be any.

    Pick your color words wisely!

    Peer Feedback:

    Not a bad read at all. Spacing between sentences is difficult to determine, since this is a documentary, and there can be lengthier pauses between scenes and what-not. But you might pick up the pacing just a bit in some spots. Mostly fine-tuning (like dropping the emphasis on "above" in the first sentence, lose the pause between "echoing across" and "a vast expanse", etc.). Also, it sounds like you may want to move the mic off-axis so you're not speaking directly into it. I didn't hear any specific plosives, but it did sound a little hard on some of the "p", "t", and "s" sounds.

    As far as background noise, I did hear a continuous ticking noise, like a motor or fan or something. It almost sounds like possibly interference of some kind, as opposed to actual background noise. What is your current set up?

    Overall, a decent read, in my opinion. Like I said, just a little fine tuning with the read, and fix the recording quality, and I think you're golden for these documentary type reads.

    Peer Feedback:

    This is an example of reading in a far too precise manner. Your hard hits on "t" and other places ("few have ever set foot" for example) and it takes away a conversational vibe. You're working the syllables too hard. If you submitted this for coaching, the very first thing they'd get on is the overly-precise diction.

    Pleasant voice but relax that delivery a bit and deliver it as if you were speaking directly to your best friend for instance.

    Peer Feedback:

    I really appreciate all of the constructive comments! I am just getting started with my first pro coaching coming up soon. Just beginning to learn the recording set up and adjustments with: modified whisperRoom 3.5X5', 3U Audio Warbler MKVID (Vintage Neumann U87 clone), microphone shock mount 3U Audio SM-2 Spider, USB audio Interface Audient iD14, Macbook pro computer, TwistedWave audio editing software, etc. I think once we study the equipment adjustments more the background humm will subside. Any advice with this equipment is appreciated. This forum is just what I was looking for and gives me the momentum to move forward with specific details to address. Thanks!

    Back to top

    58 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lohson's recording

    Appreciate your feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-100296/script-recording-90157.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Well, you're clearly reading. By that, I mean that you're not delivering the message, but reading off a page in what sounds like a disinterested and overly announcer-ish way. Instead of setting a mood or creating a picture with your delivery, you bring a bit of a roller coaster approach with your voice swinging up and down through the entire script.

    Be sure to fully form words. "Wild" as a "d" at the end where I heard "whil" from the sound file.

    It's called voice acting for a reason. Every script brings different demands for delivery. And if they don't...they should. But this one should invoke wonderment of the new discovery for the traveler. It's simply not there.

    Listen to some of the other talented people on this forum and I think you understand what I'm trying to say. Good luck.

    Peer Feedback:

    Agree with TxTom. It sounds like you're reading from the page, but putting in some wild inflections where you "think" you should. So it's studied technique we're hearing rather than a personally felt wonderment of an Antarctic travelogue.

    Do you see the pictures that the text paints in your mind? Or just the words on the page?

    This is where the acting technique of "substitution" is helpful. I don't expect that you've ever been to Antarctica. But I'll bet that you've been to some other magical place that filled you with awe and made you smile. So, conjure up those thoughts and feelings as you tell this story.

    Check the pronunciation of "grandeur"

    http://www.dictionary.com/browse/grandeur?s=t

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree. It does sound like your reading. But reading well! So with that as a good start, it needs to be refined. You need to deepen the experience for the listener. Emotion! You want to paint a picture, so to speak. You come off to me, as one of those 1950's classroom movies we used to watch in school. Educational, and sort of boring. However, you are a bit better then that, and on your way! Also, you have recording issues. There is a hum in the recording, plus you captured all the on off clicks of your mouse, no doubt. Try reducing your gain a little bit to reduce that background hum, if possible. See if that works.

    Peer Feedback:

    You have a nice voice, but it sounds like you are just reading. Very staccato and not enough acting. Needs to be believable. Keep trying. Good luck.

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    Antartica

    Script:

    Far to the south lies a land of dazzling snow fields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically carved ice mountains soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness. There are no human sounds in this land of primeval beauty, only the wild cries of birds, seals, and whales echoing across a vast, expanse of land and sea. Experience the wonders and grandeur of a land where few have ever set foot as we discover the world's last frontier -- the great White Continent. This special voyage takes place during the austral summer, when the weather is best, temperatures are moderate, and days are long. Penguin chicks are hatching and it is common to see elephant seals along the beaches.

    79 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear michelleann227's recording

    This is the 2nd time I've recorded this script, taking the comments I had gotten previously into consideration. I also decided to have some fun and add a song to it :) It may not fit perfectly but I wanted to try my hand at figuring out how to do it lol. I'd love to hear what people have to say!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-137921/script-recording-105109.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    There is something about your voice I just love. I closed my eyes and I really felt like I should have been watching a documentary. You did really well at painting the picture with your voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    You Have an Amazing Voice! If I can just imagine you doing professional work!

    Peer Feedback:

    In my opinion, your tone and that of the music is too sweet and serene. The imagery for me is much more untamed, wild, remote....dangerous and isolated. I would narrow your range of intonation and remove the music. Might be worth a try just to notice the different effect a few small changes can have. (Double check the pronounciation on primeval and grandeur.) I too enjoy listening to your voice! Thanks for sharing! Bill A.

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    Antartica

    Script:

    Far to the south lies a land of dazzling snow fields, crystalline glaciers, and dramatically carved ice mountains soaring above an untamed frozen wilderness. There are no human sounds in this land of primeval beauty, only the wild cries of birds, seals, and whales echoing across a vast expanse of land and sea. Experience the wonders and grandeur of a land where few have set foot as we discover the world's last frontier-- the great White Continent. This special voyage takes place during the austral summer, when the weather is best, temperatures are moderate, and days are long. Penguin chicks are hatching and it is common to see elephant seals along the beaches.

    68 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear michelleann227's recording

    This turned out a little choppy since I tried cutting out my breaths in between sentences. My main focus was trying to sound older than I am. I was aiming for early thirties. If you have any suggestions to help me out, I'd appreciate it. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-137921/script-recording-104913.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey, Michelle.
    I wouldn't try to sound any different than you do, unless you are talking about dialect reduction. The most natural, authentic, tension-free you is what sounds best on narration pieces like this, in my opinion. So be you. Relax. Your audience will be more focused on what you are saying than on how you are saying it. That is what the writers and producers want.

    Technically, you need more signal (voice) and less noise (room tone, hiss, etc.). It sounds like you are too far from the mic and/or need to bring up the mic gain (record level). This makes you sound more personal, friendly and not so distant.

    Thanks for sharing. Bill A.

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your voice I agree with the previous commenter about being more yourself - breathing has to happen so don't push it to far or you lose control of your voice … so to speak .
    Bill A nailed it with his tech. advice

    good job !

    Deaner65

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    Apollo 16

    Script:

    The year was 1967, and the astronauts of Apollo 16 were going to the moon. This is Charlie Duke, Lunar Module Pilot on Apollo 16. This amazing little capsule went by the call-sign CASPER, and it was the heart of an immense system of rocket engineering that got the astronauts safely to the moon and back.

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Brian C. Topping's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2061/script-recording-28024.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    That was really really nice. The meter was nice, the timing was right and the pace pretty close to perfect. The roundness you achieved in the sound was really nice. I was listening on my new headphones and the sound is really clear and crisp. Nicely done
    Nodo420

    Peer Feedback:

    Your sound quality is very nice, and your voice is great for a piece like this. My only gripe here is that you have some inflection issues; for example, at the very end of the read, your tone drops in a matter that makes you sound slightly bored. This happens a few times elsewhere, such as "Apollo 16" and "CASPER." Try another take where you inflect up instead of down, and you'll see what I mean.

    Peer Feedback:

    Tone drop at the enc of each sentence. JMM caught it too.

    To whoever wrote this script: Apollo ELEVEN was in 1969!! So 16 would have been in the 70's...April 16, 1972 to be exact. OY!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the positive and constructive feedback! Practice is key and each reminder builds upon the prior points. I am grateful to all of you for taking the time to reply.

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    Argentian

    Script:

    Mention Argentina and images of gauchos and the tango come to mind. But for many who visit it’s also a country full of natural treasures. These range from its barren northern landscapes to the sheer beauty of the soaring Andes.

    At the center of all this is the capital city of Buenos Aires, renowned for its European sophistication. Despite its size, one-third of the population of Argentina clusters in Buenos Aires, the economic core of the country, and one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world.

    It’s a rare privilege indeed to be able to get this exceptional perspective of the capital, because from this vantage point one can truly appreciate the grandeur of this legendary city.

    Below us now is the famous “plaza de mayo” considered to be the very heart of Argentina. It is in this square that the people have always come together, in good times and in bad.

    51 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear saraha616's recording

    I am new to the industry and would like to get professional advice on my performance.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-128073/script-recording-95997.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    very nice, well recorded.

    Peer Feedback:

    Sarah,

    You have a pleasant voice. It sounds more like a "read", than talking to a friend. It's a hard habit to break, but like myself try to practice every day in sounding more natural. Also, you sound further away from the microphone. Keep up the good work and effort!

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked your narration. I feel that I could easily accept this voice in an audio-book, for example.

    Peer Feedback:

    Your audio sounds like you're quite far away from the mic. It's a good read, overall.

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    16 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear rhondaduncan@att.net's recording

    Hi All...This is Take 2 on the Audrey Hepburn recording. Any feedback on performance, pacing and recording quality would be appreciated. Rhonda Duncan

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6779/script-recording-53542.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Recording quality is excellent, what type of system do you have by the way???

    The reading is a little too fast, sounds a little too "ready". Audrey Hepburn is your subject, one of the greatest actresses of all time, so there should be some since of grandiose when you say her name. This script is also biographical, so there should be some since in which you're highlighting the fine points of her life. Also, in the first sentence your mention the word "story" so there should be some since in which you're reflective.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Jacob for your feedback on pacing. I think if I slow it down abit it will take care of the "read" sound (which I didn't really hear but will take into consideration).
    Also, just thought you might like to know "since" should be "sense" if that was your intended word. Ok?

    Best, Rhonda

    Peer Feedback:

    I read your previous description. Did you intend this one to be the second take? It sounds exactly the same right down to the "...spotlight off (of) herself,..." The added word makes the sentence awkward. I, however, am guilty of that myself.

    Warm it up a bit. Really show the love and reverence you may have for this treasure of the screen and UNICEF. It sounds a little detached and readery (is that a word?).

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi James...thanks for your feedback. My goal was to deliver the read the same way only slow it down abit. Luckily, these are easy fixes and I"ll keep working on it.

    It's interesting to hear this feedback because I did this same script in my VO workout group and the Coach and peers LOVED it. Interesting huh?

    Thanks again. Rhonda

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    Baby Elephant Children's Documentary

    Script:

    In the heartland of Kilimanjaro, a baby elephant takes her first wobbly steps. Treading carefully behind her mother, the young elephant learns to follow its elders, gaining a sense of belonging and safety. She is the newest member of the herd, but soon enough, she will establish herself as the leader of her own herd.

    68 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear michellemittelstedt's recording

    Hello! I started practicing narration for children's documentaries, (4th-6th grade). I would really appreciate feedback on the tone, pitch, and recording quality. Thank you for your time and feedback!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-143892/script-recording-105699.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounded professional, I think it needs be a little bit more cheery, but over all nice recording, Thank you Kevin

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    Baseball (Ken Burn's Documentary)

    Script:

    In 1909, a man named Charles Hercules Ebbets began secretly buying up adjacent parcels of land in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn including the site of a garbage dump called “pig town” because of the pigs that once ate their fill there and the stench that filled the air.

    He hoped eventually to build a permanent home for the lackluster baseball team he had once worked for and now owned. The team was called the Trolley Dodgers or just the Dodgers after the way their devoted fans negotiated Brooklyn’s busy streets.

    In 1912, construction began. By the time it was completed, “pig town” had been transformed into Ebbets Field, baseball’s newest shrine where some of the games greatest drama would take place.

    In the years to come, Dodger fans would see more bad times than good but hardly cared. Listen to the southern cadences of a pioneer broadcaster and witness first hand when a black man wearing the number 42 trotted out to first base.

    27 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear cwick's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-79410/script-recording-62183.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice read. My only suggestion would be to throw a touch of nostalgia into your voice. Give it a more vintage feel.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good enunciation and clarity! Pauses weren't overly dramatic and the timing was almost there...maybe it could have slowed down a tad.

    You seem to have a very relaxed tone to your voice, a great attribute! But, for this read, the delivery seemed a litttle flat, I wasn't as engaged as I wanted to be if I were a baseball fan.

    Maybe just a little excitement, and by that I don't neccesarily mean a faster tempo and higher pitch...maybe speaking more warmly about the game might make this a bit more interesting. If you're not a baseball fan, just picture something that make you smile more on the inside...a good dog or your first girlfriend. Just some thoughts...

    Good luck!

    David Michaelson

    Peer Feedback:

    The interpretation of the script was good overall. The tone of your voice has a nice roundness.

    I wanted to point out the last bit to you though. How does the speaker feel about number 42? This was a big time in not only the history of baseball, but in America too. Is the speaker excited to have this change, or frustrated at the Dodgers for blazing a new trail?

    I'm new to VO recording, but had sound designer friends in school. I believe that some of your plosive sounds hit the mic a bit too strong. Maybe try a slightly different mic placement, or a good pop filter.

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    Baseball Script

    Script:

    In our next segment, we visit individual stadiums, explore tales of the classic teams, legendary stars, and the devotion of the American baseball fan. First stop: Yankee Stadium, home of the team America loves to hate and breeding ground for a host of superstars and legends. Back at the Hall of Fame in the World Series room, we explore the lives of ordinary men with extraordinary skills. And look at how and why Americans have elevated such men to mythic places in our folklore. Chicago, Illinois -- in America’s foremost sports city, our first location is Comiskey Park, the oldest standing major league ballpark in America.

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear dceckerson's recording

    Forgive any shortcomings on the part of my mic. I'm just testing out some work with narration and would love feedback on my performance. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6722/script-recording-26877.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi dceckerson,
    There are elements of your read that are good but overall it needs more enthusiasm. Dig up a stadium baseball organ rally for a background for ambiance. Then get into the spirit of your topic. Think of the some of the great baseball announcers and their deliveries. I know it's a documentary read inspired by the game but your delivery should equally be as inspiring. Oh, and I wouldn't put so much emphasis on "hate" it's rivalry not real hate.

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    30 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    My first attempt at using music. I am floundering in the dark.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-27834.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your doing great,, this seemed to flow a bit better then the last

    Peer Feedback:

    Really appreciate that. It was a different voice working with music.

    Peer Feedback:

    Just by the way, that was like a live performance with music. I played the disc on
    my dvd and read the copy at the same time. Is that how you do it?

    Peer Feedback:

    Good job Henry....although the volume of your delivery seemed to drop in some spots. Regarding the music....you need to record your music on the same program where you record your voice....but on a different track - where you can control the volume. It could have been higher.

    Peer Feedback:

    Right Marianna, I tried to keep the music in the background. If it is supposed to be more
    prominent, I can raise the volume. Then the listener can decide whether to hear the words
    or the music. I don't have any equipment to do multi-tracking, and don't intend to. I am
    working on my voice, not on production. Your comments are always welcome.

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    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Henry Dewing's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-6638/script-recording-27789.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Henry, first off let me say,, you have a great and unique voice. I think once you get a few more miles under your belt,, you could be setting on a gold mine. True, there will be spots, that your voice wont fit, but there are also others spots, that only a voice like yours will excel at. This is one of the types that you could be killer at. With that said,, this is way to choppy. There is no flow, no feeling of a friend telling me a story. You sound like your of an age that you would know what its like when trying to learn to drive a manual shift car. Most often when the new driver would try,, the car would lurch forward a few feet, then stop , the lurch then stop.. That’s the visual I get when I listen to this read. Something else to keep in mind. I too have a lowish voice. Low notes do not translate as well across the normal run of the mill speaker. And the sound waves don’t travel as fast or as far as a high frequency. So when we drop off at the end with a deep rumble,, it sounds like a larger break in sound than it may really be. I've found it helpful to always record with my headphones on, so I can hear what I sound like to the computer, and to come back a day or two after I've recorded, and see if it sounds on “tape” like it sounded in my head. The longer I do it now,, the closer what I think I did , and what it sounds like are.

    Peer Feedback:

    Very interesting! Perhaps this is a generational thing. I grew up hearing the great voices, and I don't mean LaFontaine. I may be reluctant to go to the other end of the spectrum, the "androgynous" voice that is all too common. Working on it! I just reposted this
    because of comments that my previous was too soft.

    Greatly appreciate your well-considered comments.

    Peer Feedback:

    Im not sure how we went from me saying it seems choppy to you thinking I asked you to go to androgynous... My understading of the word is androgynous =having the characteristics or nature of both male and female. I dont think there is any fear of you being mistaken for a lady.

    Peer Feedback:

    The "androgynous" didn't refer to anything you said. Sorry.

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    Betty Crocker

    Script:

    Betty Crocker is an imaginary person. Nonetheless, in a 1945 survey she was named the second-best-known woman in America, after Eleanor Roosevelt. She was “born” in 1921 during a Gold Medal flour promotion in which users completed a puzzle to win a pin cushion. Company executives decided to use the signature of “Betty Crocker” on the prize letters--Betty because the name had a warm approachable feel, and Crocker after an early company director, William G, Crocker. The fictional Ms. Crocker became so popular that she soon had her own products and recipe books, many of which still exist today.

    24 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Tonia's recording

    Okay, let's try this again. :) And I'll paste in the same comments: Thanks for any help/feedback. A couple things I'm wondering about these days is if I should be editing the sound of my files beyond just basic editing, and if there's too much of a nasal quality to my voice. I read a great article about nasality last night. Here's the link if anyone's interested: http://onlinevoicecoaching.com/?p=3506

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-31886/script-recording-60360.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Tonia, your voice, tone, speed and inflections are perfect for this read. The only thing I caught was it sounded like you lost your smile on the last six words, which is so minor it may not be worth mentioning. I may not have caught the ear for nasality yet, so there's nothing I can say about that. As far as the basic editing goes, for something like this I don't think you need to do anything at all. If you're talking about producing, i.e., adding background music and noise, I have done that when I would like some feedback on the actual production itself rather than the voice performance.

    It definitely sounds like you know what your doing!

    David Michaelson

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Tonia,
    Your tone, pace, and choice of where to use inflection was good. Great clarity also! As to whether or not your read was too nasal sounding, I think that's subjective. In my opinion, it was a good and professional sounding read.
    Jerome

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Tonia,
    I love this script! Good pace for the read and great clarity. I'm not really hearing anything overly or noticeably nasal. I love the pause used after "Betty...because the name..." It was a perfect interpretation of the written words.

    I wonder what you were saying to yourself before the first line. There is a great emphasis on imaginary. Does that--in combination with the second line--convey the disbelief that she was so well-known despite the fact that she never actually existed? Should that lightheartedness be carried throughout the read? Should I be giggling at the fact that she became so popular, yet never existed? Simply a matter of interpretation, I suppose. It is indeed a professional sounding read as is.

    Stacey Glemboski

    Peer Feedback:

    Awesome read! I really liked the pace of the whole thing, and how you told the story. The only change I might make is to add a little surprise, if that makes sense, to the last few lines, where you're talking about how she has her own cookbooks, etc. It seems a little strange to me that a fictional character has morphed into someone most of us assume existed. Overall, it was spot on. Great work!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Everyone, for the critiques!

    David M., great, subtle pick up on the loss of smile for the last six words. That's quite the ear you have. I tend to say "ta'day" for "today", so I'm always working a little hard and thinking about it when "today" comes up in a script.

    Jerome and Stacey, I'm glad it didn't sound overly nasal. You know how it is to hear one's voice recorded. I guess I'm still getting used to it. Stacey, funny you singled out that first line. I wasn't sure how to say it, so I used a technique 101 kind of trick--a lead in like this, "Betty Crocker isn't a green person, she's not a blue person...Better Crocker is an IMAGINARY person." Then I edited out the lead in. Perhaps the technique had me hitting it a little hard and without quite the right tone.

    Newk, another great critique. I think you're dead on about adding in a little surprise into that last part.

    What fabulous "ears" you all have. Thanks very much!

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    22 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Al Urkawich's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-10257/script-recording-30916.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello there,

    Your voice is awesome. It's perfect for this type of thing. I only have two problems with this read. The first is the music. It's not bad music, my problem with it was that it made me think of more of an urban ghetto setting than a mid-western village. My only other problem was that I thought that the second half of the read started to drag just a little bit, but it was really only a minor issue for me. Otherwise, I loved it. Great work!

    Peter

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Al.
    Cool read, but I thought the inflections were a little understated. It's a highly debatable aspect of what we're trying to do, but that's how I hear it. But it is a fine line..you're doing a style and I'm trying to listen into that style as you read ...an 'untouchables' kinda thing. I'll listen some more and probably appreciate it more with each listen. But with most listens it's a first impression that lasts.

    Your voice is STRONG and the overall performance was quite good. I'm nitpicking. When people have to nitpick to critique, they/we/me are looking for finer things to suggest.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Tom

    While I was doing that I was thinking of Paul Winfield's style of delivery on City Confidential with his dry wit type of delivery. ..he had a special way of narrating that sounded a little like he was putting down the towns these crimes happened in...kind of sarcastic.....and on the music....I discovered a CD I had of Royalty Free music with a lot of Hip-Hop tracks and decided to throw that into the mix.....yup...it's not Western Country!!

    Peer Feedback:

    Al
    You've got one of those very listenable deep toned voices that makes people want to listen. I do have a problem with this read though, and as Tom points out, you're obviously experienced and comfortable behind the mic so I will nit pick. What I feel weakens the read is your want to highlight numerous words or phrases. For example:
    "stunned the town."
    "months."
    "came to light."
    "story book facade"
    "exists"
    It's not that the emphasis is wrong but there is too much emphasis. You're highlighting too much so that nothing is highlighted. Punctuating should be done sparingly. Other than that your tone was spot on. As for the Hip Hop Hmmmm, It wouldn't have been my choice. So I think Peter's observation has merit. Now that I've picked this apart, I do have to say I think this read suits you well.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the critique Rich...

    I hear ya!

    I was listening to a few professional demos today...and taking note of how some people make the narration reads sound just right! It seems the good ones know exactly how to voice them.....still working at it!! I want to try another one soon!

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    Biographical Narration : Female Ruler In A World Of Men | Cleopatra

    Script:

    Cleopatra the seventh, queen of ancient Egypt is one the most famous female rulers in history. Descended from a long line of Egyptian rulers, Cleopatra was born around 69 BC. In 51 BC her father died leaving his throne to eighteen year old Cleopatra and her younger brother Ptolemy the XIII. The first three years of their rule were disastrous. And eventually her brother forced Cleopatra to flee from Egypt. Cleopatra raised and army to retaliate. Julius Caesar’s arrival in Egypt in 48 BC brought temporary peace. And then Caesar and Cleopatra became lovers. Caesar and his legionaries reinstated Cleopatra to her throne. In 47 BC Cleopatra gave birth to his son Caesarion. After Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC Cleopatra sided with Mark Antony over Caesar’s legal heir Octavian. Antony and Cleopatra soon plunged into a legendary love affair. In 40 BC Cleopatra gave birth to twins by Antony. She later provided Antony with financial support, in return Antony named Cleopatra and her son Caesarion rulers of Egypt.

    61 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Kenneths's recording

    This is another practice narration...It is meant to go over top a montage of images from ancient Egypt depicting Cleopatra in various stages of her rule and relationships. Please let me know your thoughts on performance and script interpretation. Thanks in advance!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-151887/script-recording-106492.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice complements this script really well. I like the way you tell the story. Just the right amount of dramatic gravitas in your delivery. Smooth, connected, yet varied phrasing throughout most of the piece. I might quibble about a few inflections or pauses but they are minor and, in the case of pauses, can easily be adjusted by the producer/editor. I can imagine your narration sitting in the midst of a full production without any trouble. Great job! Thanks for sharing. Bill A.

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    Biographical Narration : Female Ruler In A World Of Men | Cleopatra

    Script:

    Cleopatra the seventh queen of ancient Egypt is one the most famous female rulers in history. Descended from a long line of Egyptian rulers Cleopatra was born around 69 BC. In 51 BC her father died leaving his throne 2 eighteen year old Cleopatra and her younger brother Ptolemy the XIII. The first three years of their rule were disastrous.

    67 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Kenneths's recording

    Working on some of the final scripts for my narration demo. This one is for a history documentary meant to be read over imagery related to the copy. It is a little faster read than it would be normally for the demo… love any thoughts on interpretation and performance. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-151887/script-recording-106625.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked this as you changed your accent and demeanor as if to say that Cleopatra was quite a big deal, let me tell you! It made me smile because I heard your other three recordings. What stood out was the contrast from the other demo choices.You seem to choose some deliberate nuances well. Dropping the bottom in your voice to create a greater sonority, for instance. Great recording quality.

    Peer Feedback:

    mikocrouch thank you so much for taking the time to comment on the reads I have posted.... really appreciate you taking the time to do that. Looking forward to hearing your submissions. Best!

    Kenneth

    Peer Feedback:

    This read shows a different style, appropriate for the subject/genre. Nicely done. I do hear quite a bit of background noise in this file. Sounds like you used a gate or edited it out between sentences. Kind of distracting. Were you doing some laundry? ;-) Thanks for sharing and good luck as you record your demo. Bill A.

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    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Fiona H.'s recording

    Would love feedback on the sound, overall quality, whether compelling or not... in fact, anything that you'd care to give feedback on would be much appreciated! Thanks in advance -

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3612/script-recording-24039.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Great voice, The quality is there for sure. Loved the read!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi, Fiona
    Love your voice. Mellow and well-modulated.

    I found the read too slow; it sounded as if you were approaching every word very carefully...too carefully. That had me listening more to your individual words and phrases than to the flow of the narrative.

    I wondered about the choice of music. Struck me as a little too pastoral to work with a WWII story.

    Much success to you as you pursue your voice over career.
    David.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Fiona,
    You're very well read and articulate. I completely agree with Dan and David. The read lacks the suspense and drama associated with a topic that was a pivotal turning point in the war with Germany. David is right about the music a more suspenseful choice would have infused your read with a better tone. As for the annunciation of words, it's an English thing I know but you always want to tailor your read to what is comfortable to your audience. Otherwise it's taken more as an English lesson than a dramatic read. The accent is one of your most desirable assets. It can open doors that others would have great difficulty with. If you stay with it I think you have the ability to do quite well in voice over. However, articulate or not, expect a lengthy learning curve this stuff isn't as easy as it looks.

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    Border Wars

    Script:

    Finally, Garcia and Alvarez's tireless efforts pay off.
    The smugglers take off running but are apprehended with the assistance of the canine crew.
    The total street value of the agents' bust ----over one million dollars.
    This is only a small portion of the drugs passing through the Nogales border station each week.

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear ptdanno's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/border wars.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    very good job,

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    Broken Tail

    Script:

    The tiger known as Broken Tail was born in Ranthambhore National Park in northern India, a vast, natural reserve for a wide variety of Indian wildlife, but especially famous for its Bengal tigers. Historically revered in Indian tradition, tigers in the area were once protected by maharajahs, and then by government sanctuaries and conservation projects. But poachers have proven to be nearly unstoppable over the years, and tigers have struggled to survive, even with the protection of the park. At one point, there were as few as 26 tigers left in the reserve, and today, the fate of each and every tiger is important to the species as a whole. Conservation efforts have been intensified in the face of the crisis, and the struggle continues. Broken Tail: A Tiger’s Last Journey is the story of the life and death of a tiger destined for greatness, who may still lead the way to a better future for those of his kind.

    15 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear mjc55's recording

    Has been a little while since I've posted. Have a new recording space that I just completed a few weeks ago so along with comments on the read, let me know your thoughts on the over all sound of the space.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-5941/script-recording-44902.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi,
    Recording quality appears to be very good.

    It sounded to me as though you had a touch "dry mouth".
    I think you needed to convey a bit more emotion (anger, hope, etc.)
    "Broken Tail: .....A tigers Last Journey" needs better pacing.
    "BROKEN TAIL!...A Tigers Last Journey.

    bebrown

    Peer Feedback:

    Your recording quality sounded pretty nice, mjc55. However, the read seem just a little dry or devoid of emotional connection. While it *is* about a somber subject, you can bring more personality to the delivery. Goooooood sound quality overall.

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    Bureau of Engraving & Printing

    Script:

    If you’ve ever looked closely at one of the bills in your wallet, you will have noticed that each bill has green Treasury Seals and serial numbers, as well as black Federal Reserve Seals and District numbers. The presses at your left are overprinting this important information, in sequential order, on each bill while it is still in one sheet containing 16 bills. One hundred of these sheets at a time are then stacked into a plexiglass tray. There is a small suction cup underneath the counting device, making sure that the count is accurate and that no sheets have stuck together.

    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Sherrill S's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-12306/script-recording-53420.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I loved the read. Great performance. Your read works very well. The recording quality is good.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good read. I detected quite a bit of mouth noise - lip smacking and tongue clicking. It's a common problem. Something to be aware of.

    The pronunciation of "Treasury" sounded a little "western" to me. Wyoming or Montana?

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks James for your comments. Mouth noises are a major problem I am working on. I am a native Californian and always thought I had a pretty neutral accent. Very interesting.

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    Bureau Of Engraving & Printing

    Script:

    If you’ve ever looked closely at one of the bills in your wallet, you will have noticed that each bill has green Treasury Seals and serial numbers, as well as black Federal Reserve Seals and District numbers. The presses at your left are overprinting this important information, in sequential order, on each bill while it is still in one sheet containing 16 bills. One hundred of these sheets at a time are then stacked into a plexiglass tray. There is a small suction cup underneath the counting device, making sure that the count is accurate and that no sheets have stuck together.

    110 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear TJS's recording

    Hey my Edge family been a while since I have been online. Was outta the booth for a couple days dealing with some family things. Anyways, been trying to get practice in with everything I see. First post back in about a week, maybe a week in a half... BTW does anyone work with REAPER MEDIA? Looking for some pointers on this DAW. Thank you guys and God Bless, TJS

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-74154/script-recording-78854.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    It sounds like you're reading with little "connection" to the material. I hear words and I am getting the mental pictures that you're describing, but it's more like a grainy black & white movie than coming to me in hi-def color.

    There is also a curious thing that happens at the beginning of the second and third sentences. It sort of sounds like a kind of grunt before you begin the first word - "uh-The press..." and "oo-One hundred..."

    I use Reaper almost exclusively. I think that it's a very powerful tool and is very under appreciated. It has its drawbacks, like the lack of a spectral analyzer like the one included with Adobe Audition being one of them. But it does have a feature where you can select 2 alternate editing programs to manipulate the recording before rendering the final product. So you can have Reaper and Audition open at the same time manipulating the same WAV file, bouncing back and forth between programs seamlessly. If you haven't already, you should download and install the SWS extensions for Reaper (a link can be found on the Reaper website) and download and install the LAME MP3 encoder (the same one used for Audacity) to render MP3's directly from Reaper. It's much more program than you'll ever need for VO, but it is highly configurable. So you can streamline it to suit your purposes. For instance, I have eliminated several of the toobar buttons that I'd never use for recording VO and created some of my own that I use frequently for every session, and assigned them a hotkey. You can also change the "look" by downloading different color configuration schemes (there's also a link for that on the Reaper website) to the point where you could make it look like ProTools if you wanted to. It's VST friendly, so you can use third party VST FX plugins, but the ones included with Reaper (which are extensive) are more than adequate. You can re-assign hot combinations and create macros (and assign them a hot key) for some common tasks. You don't have to click around on a tool bar to change the cursor function for editing, just hover it over certain spots and it changes to the tool you need. Zoom in and out on the wave form with the scroll wheel, no need for clicking (+) and (-) signs on the screen. The manual is over 400 pages long, most of which you won't need for VO, like MIDI configurations and VSTi stuff unless you're composing your own music as well. Shall I go on?

    If you give me an idea of what task(s) you need to perform in Reaper, I may be able to suggest something.

    There are tons of helpful tutorials on YouTube as well. Some of them are a little dated as Reaper is updated fairly often, but the general ideas may still apply.

    Peer Feedback:

    I loved it. Your voice has a commanding tone. It makes you want to follow along, so you want miss any of the instructions that you are presenting. Which works extremley well for this particular copy, congrats, Good job.

    Peer Feedback:

    Stillwell Audio has some really nice plugins that are discounted for Reaper (why Reaper is their favorite, I don't know....). They're all standard VST, so I use some of them on Logic Pro. (my favorites are "Event Horizon", "CMX", and "1973").
    And, they have a Spectrum analyzer.
    It's all try-before-you-buy; They just nag you until you get a license.

    regarding this read: It reminds me of the "How It's Made" series. The host delivers a somewhat flat sequence of facts that aren't really intended to be emotional, but more of a technical explainer about a somewhat dry, but yet interesting subject.

    I found your delivery to be pretty good, but if I were the engineer, I would've cut it a little tighter. some of the delays seemed a little too long. (Maybe there's supposed to be visuals along with the voice over that clarifies the pacing....dunno.)

    There seemed to be just a touch of proximity pressure sound going on - it sounded a little like you were talking into box - do you use one of those "mic in a box" setups? you might consider backing up a couple more inches.

    cheers,
    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your voice I just had a hard time with the diction some words were a little hard to understand. I use an outside recorder and audacity right now with my shuresm7b mic so sorry cant help ya with Reaper.

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    Businessman Heroes

    Script:

    50 years ago, businessmen were folk heroes. You and I may think the first Henry Ford was an eccentric with a distinctly comic side -- but our grandfathers didn’t. At the turn of the century, a certain class of business figure enjoyed a degree of public admiration that Americans of that period offered to very few of their politicians. Over the years, but especially since World War II, that unqualified admiration has evaporated. The trouble has little to do with the conduct of business, and everything to do with the present stage of American technology.

    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Patrick Kamler's recording

    I re-recorded this, taking out the long pauses and trying to relax my read and delivery a bit more; maybe even sounding a bit informal. Thanks for your feedback!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Businessmen Heroes_0.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm not sure if the copy interpretation is right for this read. It sounded a bit "salesy" to me, and I don't think that is what was intended after I myself read the text. Vocal performance is really great. I can hear you perfectly, and would only suggest to slow down your pace just a bit.

    Peer Feedback:

    What's your hurry? The words went by so fast that the sense of the text went completely out the window.

    One thing, and I think it's a universal convention. The pronunciation of a long "a" before a word beginning with a vowel and "ah" before a word beginning with a consonant - unless you are making a point to draw attention to the word as A singular thing.

    Peer Feedback:

    I feel winded after listening....slow it down and try again.

    Peer Feedback:

    I have to agree with the other reviewers--the pacing was too quick for my ears and the tone was a bit on the "up" side, if that makes any sense. Did you digitally chop out some of the pauses after the fact? The "--" between "comic side" and "but our grandfathers" sounds more like a comma or a very brief pause, which makes me think that maybe it's due more to editing than performance. Voice-wise, the read was clean and consistent and your recording is a-ok...if you take things down a peg or two you'll be right on the money :)

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm an ewok on a speeder bike!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ewkfdEc1bg
    @0:19

    I can hear your gulping breaths between phrases. I think if you slowed it down and got the breath marks right, you could relax and tell the story rather than read the copy. Own the script. Who are you telling the story to?

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    Caribbean Seafood

    Script:

    An early Caribbean traveler recorded the “rare kinds of fishes” he tasted at Barbadian tables this way: “Mullets, Macquerels, Parrot Fish, Snappers, Crabs, and Lobsters.”
    Like him, today’s island visitors relish the opportunity to taste seafood with exotic names, and equally exotic preparations.

    34 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear RTX's recording

    Script from EdgeStudio library on Caribbean Seafood.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-16030/script-recording-36791.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Love your choice of music beds...:-) are there more than one island?

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    Century of Change

    Script:

    In the years between 1850 and 1950 the world changed, more than in all the centuries of
    history. In thaat time, the Industrial Revolution took root in the imaginations of the
    American people.

    America had started its national life with the advantage of many cultures being exchanged among her citizens. American history began with the momentum of centuries of discovery and experiment by others. The people who went to America took to her shores faith, courage and a sense of wonder and curiosity ... the qualities that gave The
    United States a national spirit. That spirit began to flower during the "Century of Change."

    These human qualities shared by Americans are important in understanding how
    The United States became the modern nation it is today.

    33 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Trying a documentary style text for the first time. How are the tempo and style? Thanks for your time and suggestions.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28038.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Ya, that was a nice performance. I'm listening through some new cans I got and there wasn't any noise or artifacts I could hear.
    The pace was nice and your voice nicely relaxed. I may have changed some emphasis or inflection ex, ...brought faith,... I'd inflect that just a little, instead of down because my ears told me that was the end of the idea. Maybe not inflect at all, They brought faith (and), courage...same tone.

    Very nice, I think you did what you set out to do. Nodo420

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Nodo. Nice performance! On a side note, I was picking up some slight mouth noises. Stay hydrated.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Nodo and Dean. Very nice read, and heard a few mouth sounds. How does that commerical go???"Stay thirsty, my friends." (Love that guy).

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with the above,, nice read, nice tone, nice pace,, as for the mouth sounds,, have you tried greeen apples yet,, eat one a bit before speaking,, it tones down the mouth sounds,, I tried it , it workes for me... and I get no kick back from the green apple poeple

    Peer Feedback:

    Excellent job, Scott. You have a beautiful voice; however, you might want to take care not to inflect down at the end of each thought and/or sentence. Other than that, you sound terrific.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks to everyone for the feedback and encouragement.

    Haven't tried Green Apples yet, but sounds like a good idea.

    Thanks also for the tips about the inflection. I slipped up in a few places (going down on "faith"). I need to watch them more closely.

    Appreciate you comments and suggestions!

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    No coffee, drink 1 large glass of lukewarm lemon water , Slices of Granny smith apple ( suck on those slices ) , a little honey if that's what you're into. And most importantly record during the time of day when you know you're voice is as smooth as it can be. All of us here know that special time ( mines late day ,early evening ) that's when I lay it on thick LOL

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    CHI Health

    Script:

    There are approximately 100 trillion cells in the human body, that's 30 times as many stars as there are in all the known galaxies.

    Every minute, 300 million cells in our body die. But each day, an adult human body creates about 300 billion new cells.

    57 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear chynachuu's recording

    I am testing out my home studio. I have an MXL VO 1-A, and I want to know if there is anything bad about my audio quality or if I need to adjust any levels - EQ, gain, compression (I am still learning these things so I would like to know as much as possible about my recording). Thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-52396/script-recording-53905.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I hear some sibilance and pacing seems to be a little off and it sounds like your in a room with maybe no acoustical treatment or to much re verb (plugin)or something. Keep it up and don't stop practicing.Nice voice

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you so much for your feedback, wbryant! I think what you're saying is that I have too much echo? I am having so much fun recording, I will definitely keep on practicing and tweaking my settings! =)

    Peer Feedback:

    In order to perfectly engineer a recording, do I need a trained ear (where it is an art, and there is no one right answer) or are there set guidelines that I can follow (where it is a technical skill and yes there is one right answer by setting the EQ to this, never exceeding 0 db, etc)?

    For instance, I wasn't aware of the sibilance and reverb that wbryant pointed out. Could I have detect those glitches in Audacity by analyzing levels?

    Thanks!

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    Chicago Jazz Ensemble

    Script:

    Founded by the late Jazz Composer, William Russo, the Chicago Jazz Ensemble specializes in the repertories of Duke Ellington, Stan Kenton and other great bands that have forged the American big band Jazz Heritage. Before our show begins, we take you on a journey spanning the history of the Chicago Jazz scene, and honoring the cultural history of this club.

    65 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jshipp53's recording

    first upload, what do you think

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-139027/script-recording-105018.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Jshipp! Welcome to the forum! I'm not sure if it's just my laptop, but I can't hear your recording very well. You may want to play it back just to double check it's audible here.

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    29 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lcw115's recording

    Hi Everyone. I want to apologize for any sound quality issues with this script and other ones I upload. As I was given a microphone as a birthday present from a friend recently, but it was not of high quality for recordings and produced a lot of static. Therefore, I am using my old method of recording with my laptop and editing with Audacity. Please comment on performance. Would appreciate constructive, positive and courteous feedback. Thank you.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7256/script-recording-27760.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    WHADDAYA TALKING ABOUT??? Oh that was so cool! Understanding your mic limitations, it sounded goog. geez, nicely read, perky, cool... and the music suited it perfectly. Maybe a little too long on the pause at the beginning, but overall darn cool.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Nodo! LOL!!!

    The reason I paused at the beginning, was because I have tendency to visualize my scripts. Therefore, I visualized the contents of a candy factory presented on tv, said the first line, paused so the audience would see the visuals, then continued.

    I have to stop with visualization, but I can't help it! I like being creative with my reads, but if it was for an audition, I would read it accordingly.

    Thank you so much for your comment and I'm awaiting your scripts!

    Best of luck, LCW.

    Peer Feedback:

    Liked it,, I think the pauses were a bit to large,, but over all a great spot . nice music,,would like to hear it balanced, and not all on one side

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    27 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Chris Coulter's recording

    I believe I have significantly reduced the unwanted rasp of my fingers on the braille page. I'd like to know for sure if this is true. I also need feedback on my performance because I'm a little uncertain of how this would work in narration of a documentary.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Christianity.MP3

    Peer Feedback:

    Chris, that was too slow, too dramatic and your interpretation of the copy (hitting words etc) needs adjustment. Think to your self: what is the story behind this Narration? If someone were telling me this story, how would I want to hear it, how would I react? Then think about the writer and get into his/her head, and what was the thought process behind writing this. What message did they want the listener to get.

    Try again ...

    Peer Feedback:

    Chris .... I listened to this recording again, and I really think you have potential as a talent and a voice. I'd like to work with you via Skype. if you are interested email me here voiceovers at danielkrempa dot com.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you, Daniel, for both of your comments. Unfortunately my "vintage" Mac doesn't support the most recent version of Skype. I'll save your E-mail address and let you know when it is possible for me to work with you. Either that, or we can find some other way to work together.

    Peer Feedback:

    No problem Chris. We can send audio files back and forth.You can send me a recording and I can drop another track on and give you some suggestions. That would probably work better with my schedule too. Send me your email. Talk soon!

    Peer Feedback:

    Chris, way better with the raspy sound. Yeah, what Daniel said about it being really slow. Emphasized words sounded more like the drama of a promo than documentary. Going over the top is better than coming in too sedate, though, to my mind. Even though it didn't quite work I like that you went for it. I hear the coaches say you can always pull it back. It's good to find the edges here on the forum in practice. Maybe check out some documentaries and see how many words per minute they run. I just might do the same!

    Peer Feedback:

    The older version of Skype still works on the Mac PPC computers. I've got a G5 model in my office and still run skype. However, it's really only good for voice. Getting a video chat going is more troublesome unless you own an EyeSight camera (from Apple) or one of the very few other compatible cameras. Once Apple went to Intel chips, they also loosened up the requirements for cams to work. My webcam is actually a Microsoft cam on my intel Mac.

    If you haven't tried finding the last version to work on the PowerPC macs and OS X 10.5, you can find it at: http://www.oldapps.com/mac/skype.php?old_skype=37

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    18 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Chris Coulter's recording

    This is a second pass on this script. I received many helpful comments the first time around and have changed the read, especially making it faster.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Christianity-2.MP3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Chris,

    The pacing is still a bit slow, enough that your sentences are losing their structure with breathing breaks. If this were to be accompanying a video as a promo, you don't have to make such a deliberate delivery on each word like that. It makes it sound unnatural. The intention might be for it to sound profound, but as a listener I actually get distracted by the break up of the sentences. It sounds so non-conversational that we almost have difficulty digesting what you are saying. Our brains are used to listening to and processing language in ways we hear every day, and when we have to make adjustments to that because of a slow, deliberate pace, it actually requires effort.

    What is the relevance of "founded a religion" in the final sentence? It is the response to "despite persecution". The way you are delivering it, it is almost thrown away because the inflection on the end of the word "religion" lifts up the same way "persecution" does. "Persecution" lifts up to indicate a thought, and "founded a religion" starts the completion of that thought. It is the first of three "action" verbs being used. Founded, redefined, and changed. It answers the question "What did they do?" and that's the big point of this text. Don't throw it away, love those actions. If we don't believe you feel those are important, they won't be important to us.

    I was watching an interview with Maurice LaMarche earlier this week (if you don't know who he is, find out. He's important.) and he said "It doesn't matter if you're actually talking to millions. Talk to one person." He was referring to being natural in the act of reading, and that's a big part of being believable.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi There....
    I too think a faster pace is warranted. It sounds like you have a great base to work from, with a good voice, maybe a little more relaxed delivery?

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    22 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lcw115's recording

    Please comment on performance and would appreciate constructive, courteous, and positive feedback. Thank you.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7256/script-recording-31196.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    It is an incredible story, as the script says, but you are rushing the delivery a bit. Slow down and let the story come through. Make those key words count! Hey, they changed the world forever! You can do it.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Bill,

    LOL!!! I did this script last year and I read it too slow, therefore I was trying to add just a little more energy to it. However, I understand what you mean regarding the content of the script.

    Thank you for your comment...and the encouragement too!

    Take Care,
    LCW

    Peer Feedback:

    I like the tone a lot on this one. But I'd have to agree with what Bill said.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Javi,

    I'm going to do this one over eventually, and deliver it at the right pace. It's a script that you don't want to read it so slow whereas it becomes bland or make it over the top by being too dramatic. So I'll work on it and record it again.

    Thank you for your feedback, I appreciate it.

    Lenny (LCW)

    Peer Feedback:

    Agree with Bill on the pace..but I wouldn't slow it TOO much. And as Bill mentioned, there are some key words which need hitting as you did most of the way...but kinda left the final thought without a good emphasis..."and CHANGED the WORLD forever"...something along those lines. I do hear progress, Lenny!

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Tom,

    I have to thank, you, Javier, and Richurd for the progress I'm making as the Skype sessions I've had with you guys; have really been helpful. I'm going to do this script over and emphasize on the keys words to make the read more effective.

    Take Care,
    Lenny

    Peer Feedback:

    Javier is going by Jose now...

    Peer Feedback:

    Why?! Are you serious? I like the name Javier more and with his voice; it adds a certain amount of sophistication of a European type essence. As when I listen to him, I always pick up this intellectual vibe which is quite refreshing!

    Peer Feedback:

    He changed his Skype name to José Lothario

    Peer Feedback:

    Fear not my dear.. the Jose Lothario thing was just a little joke, that's all. : )

    Peer Feedback:

    I see now! I have to get use to Tom's sense of humor because he made it sound like you were actually going to use another name to the point whereas I sent you an email about this!
    Aaaagh!!! But whatever name you go by, you still got a great voice IMO!

    Lenny.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hahaha! Thanks!

    But we all have good voices and not one is better than the other. It's what we do with our voices that's important. : )

    Peer Feedback:

    LOL! Sorry to get you so worked up, Lenny!

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    Christianity

    Script:

    Christianity

    It began as an obscure movement and grew to become the single largest religion in the history of the world - moving from the streets of Jerusalem to the far reaches of the globe.
    This is the incredible story of the people who despite persecution, founded a religion, redefined God and changed the world forever.

    38 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear RTX's recording

    Practice Recording with script from EdgeStudio library on Christianity.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-16030/script-recording-36790.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance - I liked it. Your pacing was good, I heard some emotion in the read, really lovely.

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    Company Documentary

    Script:

    This is where we are now.

    To seek and amplify potential...motivated by an endless pursuit of achievement...trusted to advise and lead.

    And as this message spread, so did its demand. For ALL users. Eventually spawning a chain of retail stores throughout the nation, never deviating from that original goal, to create purpose-built gear for the most demanding of missions.

    These are our customers. And they all have one desire in common..from the adventurer to the LE professional. The hunter to the Home Defender.

    110 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear kenbond's recording

    Narration for an internal company documentary/promo. Going for deep, authoritative delivery.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113659/script-recording-95331.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The recording quality sounds good and your delivery is clear but the overall performance is too elongated and deliberate. You need more variety in tempo. Sounding authoritative doesn't require a constant low pitch to make you sound "serious." You want to display confidence in what you're telling the audience - like you're the authority on this subject. Imagine talking "to" them and not "at" them to be more conversational. Think of a favorite teacher of yours who gave great lectures and aim for that kind of variety in your delivery.

    Peer Feedback:

    Yep watch the delivery. Forget about going for a deeper sound. Be yourself...read the script a couple times before laying it down.

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    Cosmic Origins

    Script:

    This is the story of a small planet in space called Earth.
    Today it has mighty oceans; scorched deserts; and frozen wildernesses.
    It supports a multitude of diverse creatures, and is home to more than 6 billion people and their technological civilization.

    But how did all this come about? Where do we come from?

    Until recently, Earth and its lifeforms were a mystery. Like a huge unpainted canvas, little was known about the origin of Earth and its inhabitants.
    But today, we have a rough idea of what happened.
    It began – with a bang

    About 12 billion years ago, scientists think, from a singular explosion, the universe was born. In those first moments, intensely hot hydrogen and helium raced outward – thinning, cooling, and clumping into vast, organized structures.
    Within a few billion years, countless galaxies had emerged. Each one containing hundreds of billions of stars - constantly changing in cycles of birth, death and rebirth. In one of these galaxies, about 5 billions years ago, one average-sized star, our sun, captured in its gravitational field the gas and dust that would become 9 planets.

    50 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear briank411's recording

    This is my 2nd recording after my first coaching session. I did the best I could to take all the advice I was given. Since this is a documentary script, I was able to slow down my pace to make it feel more like it should be for a documentary. I hope you all enjoy it, and I really do appreciate any/all constructive critiquing!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-141905/script-recording-103099.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Brian,

    I'm looking to improve on a similar genre, documentary work, so take my feedback with a grain of salt. You have a full, deep voice, which makes the script easy to listen to. A few things that jumped out at me were:

    - It sounds like you have a bit of an accent, maybe from somewhere down south? Maybe try to work on finding a more neutral sound.

    - It sounded like you were right up against the microphone in the beginning. It sounded better towards the end but initially it was very in your face. With a "big" sounding voice you don't need to over do it.

    Overall great read and good job getting around some of the tongue twister like pronunciations in some spot. Keep up the good work.

    -Tyler

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for your critique Tyler! Yes I am from the south and that actually threw me for a loop for a second because I thought I’d gotten rid of my accent. Lol. I will work on cleaning it up a little more. And thank you for the advice on the mic...being a true novice with V.O. that kind of advice is really helpful. I will work on backing up from the mic a tad.

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    87 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear jerry lino's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3696/script-recording-81507.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Jerry,

    Amazing selection of music bed for script timing and dialogue matches.
    I really liked the sincere dramatic level of interest in the read with good inflection on key phrases..

    Your Mic is bright and yet still captures the nuances of your voice resonance. Would love to know your processing chain ;-)

    John

    Peer Feedback:

    Really good stuff, Jerry.

    Nice tone and pacing.

    Very compelling read.

    Side note: The processing seems a tad different (in a good way) from some past submissions. I think you've hit on something.

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    62 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear JerryLino's recording

    I'll gladly welcome any comments or critiques.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-571/script-recording-64346.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Really good read. It's a tough script (for me!) but you have the pace and register that made it work. One observation: I was enjoying your voice and the read and then found myself pulled away from a change in the music. Was it a string Quartet? it pulled me away from focusing on you. Nice bit of work there!
    LP

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds like you've been practicing. I listened initially through the computer speakers and thought the sound was a bit on the thin side. I put on my headphones (AKG K240 Studios) and had to stop the playback quick...the sound is really hot in the upper frequencies. I checked it out on a spec analyzer and there's not much going on below 100 hz except music. This may be a simple matter of too much EQ on the upper frequencies that take the vocals out of balance or it maybe be taking out the lowers with a high-pass filter. It's just really bright sounding through my headphones and my monitors.

    Peer Feedback:

    What is there to say? The pacing is perfect. The overall production allowed me to visualize the scenes you described. If there is anything to critique, it would be that the voice track itself seems a tad thin in my headphones. There isn't a lot of low end. It's not a bad thing really because it allows room for the other sound elements. This is very good.

    Peer Feedback:

    JerryLino --
    good to see you back on the forum. Great stuff. I'm somewhat miffed that your version of this read really smokes mine….I'll be on my way to delete it now…lol.

    Pro voice, perfect pace, and I like the soundscape.

    cheers,
    DS.

    PS: how's that Superbowl gig shaping up?

    Peer Feedback:

    H guys,
    Thanks for the feedback. Any responses to the technical issues that were brought up will be addressed in the near future. And yes Dave the Super Bowl announcing gig is still on track. I'll be announcing in the celebrity guest pavilion at the MetLife stadium on the big day and I'm beyond excited as well as honored to have been chosen for such a prestigious event. I'll let you guys know how it went.

    Peer Feedback:

    "Kim Kardashian is with us, fresh off her recent trip to the restroom and an energetic pee, ....tell us Kim, do you even know who is playing today??? Are you wearing underwear or are you going commando?"

    Just for fun

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice in this recording provided me with a vivid mental image of the cosmos. Very clear, clean, and professional; after listening to Sagan's "Pale Blue Dot", your readings are undoubtedly on par.

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow. Great read, and now I'm totally inspired to start working with music beds, sfx, et cetera. I've mostly held of until now, focusing on just my voice. Any tips on how to get started? There's such a glut of search engine responses to terms like "music beds". I'm a little overwhelmed, and I'm not sure how much I should expect to pay to build a little music/sounds/sfx library with which to work, or if I should even try to. Any advice would be much appreciated!

    Peer Feedback:

    Jerry, very nice read! Love your voice and your pacing was spot on for this type of read!!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for taking the time to listen and comment. I stated that any questions regarding the technical aspects of the recording would be addressed in the near future , well they will be ... but not by me. This piece is the work of 2 individuals. Myself and Dave ( dfsaund ). Dave and I got to talking and decided to collaborate on something. I loved his take on the Cosmic Origins script and I thought his editing skills were top notch. So I supplied the voice and Dave engineered the crap out of this puppy. I recorded the bulk of it on Friday night. Dave contacted me repeatedly on Saturday to request multiple pickups for a few of the lines and then he worked his magic. I am so impressed with the finished product.Thanks again Dave , I can't wait to work together again.

    Peer Feedback:

    I am unsurprised cuz, Dave, you da man. I haven't forgotten your advice to analyze commercials and re-create them and that's part of why I need to start building a library of sounds/music for myself. Love that the two of you collaborated. Love this website/Edge and what we can accomplish when we work together.

    T

    Peer Feedback:

    thanks Tonia and Jerry. very fun.
    music library is something to build over time. I now turn to youtube for most everything. I mentioned The Secession and Capo Productionz. subscribe to their channels. that's just the tip of the iceberg.

    Guys like Scott Burns buy/license whole music bed libraries (for thousands of $$), but that's for pro, finished, broadcast commercials.

    I shoot you an email so I don't keep droning on and on….

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    Cyclone Of Bangladesh

    Script:

    The cyclone of November 12, 1970 in Bangladesh, is widely considered to be the worst natural disaster of the 20th century. Between 300,000 and 500,000 residents of this dangerously poised, ecologically unsound country were killed by a combination of wind and water.

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear sabrinasvoice's recording

    Thank you for your feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-4472/script-recording-30716.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi There...

    I find it generally well done. Maybe smooth it out a touch? Not sure I would put as much emphasis on CYCLONE when you start the story. This is interesting copy and the ideas were nicely conveyed

    Peer Feedback:

    Love your voice. You sound very relaxed and easy to listen to.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good recording quality (What mic do you use?). It does sound a little scripted, but overall a solid recording.

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    Deadly Speed

    Script:

    The cheetah is the world's fastest land mammal. With acceleration that would leave most automobiles in the dust, a cheetah can go from zero to sixty miles an hour in only three seconds. Its impressive speed, coupled with its sharp eyesight, make the cheetah a formidable hunter.

    23 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Wanda Phipps's recording

    I missed the deadline for this week's contest but thought I would try my hand at the script anyway as practice. Please don't judge the recording quality because I don't have my home studio set up yet. The directions said: audition for Animal Planet’s featured documentary - narration for hour-long piece. The tone of the read shouldn't be overly dramatic. It should have color and life, but still sound very natural.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-27888/script-recording-60394.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like the quality of your voice. I am not a professional, but I would suggest adding a little more color so it sounds exciting as you are reading it. Your tone is excellent.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks arischac--I was trying not to be too dramatic as the directions suggest but maybe I underplayed it too much. I appreciate your thoughts on this.

    Peer Feedback:

    Slates are tricky things and everyone has their own opinion on how to do them. I would suggest giving yourself a beat after the slate before you dive into the copy.

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    Death During Filming

    Script:

    Long after their time is up, movie stars live on through DVDs and cable reruns. But the stars on this list died before completing a project, leaving directors in an emotional and logistical bind, and forever attaching a dark footnote to a movie's history. In some cases the movie was canceled, or the star was recast, while in others production moved forward with some creative editing.

    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Daniel.f.purcell's recording

    This is my first use of this area. Please provide feedback on my performance so i may improve. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Death During Filming Practice.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Daniel this is my first time doing anything like this. I'm not sure I am qualified to give much feedback but what I can say is your voice was crisp, clear, and pleasant.

    Peer Feedback:

    Good voice and articulation. I understood every word. Now you need to put in another layer and make it somewhat more conversational. I got the information, but the tone didn't compel me to want to listen to more.

    Almost all of the punctuation - whether it was a comma or a period - stopped. And, even though I know that there's more to this, it just stopped at the end. It didn't propell me to my next expectation that you were going to tell me more.

    I just read back through the script without listening. The whole thing is one complete thought, I think. So, if you happen to run one sentence fragment into another (without stopping for a comma) or even ran one sentence into another (nearly ignoring the period), the thought might become more of a whole rather than fragments. People don't always observe punctuation when they are talking to one another. One exercise is to try to put it into your own words (ignore the copy) the way you would tell it to a friend, see (hear) how you express it, then read the copy visualizing the way you told your version of the story to your friend.

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    Decoding Nazi Secrets Part 1

    Script:

    Decoding Nazi Secrets
    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of western Europe. Hitler was tightening the noose around Britain. In the Atlantic, German U-boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a secret weapon, the strangest military establishment in the world. Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors, Americans and British, all came here with one common aim: to unlock the secrets of the Enigma, a machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. If Enigma could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance.

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Here is the first part of a two part recording. It is the second REPOST after getting more feedback. I think the pace is OK, since I found the original on YouTube. The link for the original is: (1/12) World War II Mind of a Code Breaker Still trying to work out ROOM NOISE problem. Is it any better? Thanks for your suggestions and critiques! All the best, Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28676.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Very nice voice Scott. I fell that if you had a little more energy in your read that it would be great. Otherwise very great quality.

    Peer Feedback:

    Scott, Thank you for coming back with the re-post and giving us another chance to hear your improvements. I like your voice for this type of material; it is a really good match. I am trying to work with similar documentary narration and still trying to find the right tone consistently.

    General comments:
    1) This 3rd post is definitely smoother and less high-spirited than March 9. A very noticeable improvement. I like this version much better. There may be room to probably go even a very little bit more serious (as Tom suggested back on March 9) without losing the interest that your voice shows. It's more of a subtle difference at this point since this one is already much more "adult oriented" than the March 9 take.
    2) you have clearly corrected "Alloid" to "Allied" in this take compared with March 9. "Allied" came out correctly in March 10 also.
    3) I actually notice the Room Noise MORE in this version for some reason. I think the silent gaps in editing on this take make it stand out more. I hear silent gaps between words/phrases here that I do not hear in the two earlier takes. I'm not sure it is from pumping or gating or whether it is splicing in silent gaps instead of ambient room noise. For example, you hear it especially in the gap between "convoys" and "threatening". What changed in the recording environment? different location? different processing from March 10?
    David

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello!

    Thanks to everyone for the comments.

    I made some changes to my Focusrite channel strip and adjusted the gate setting to see if I could get around the room noise problem that way. Guess it didn't work yet. Will continue to make adjustments with it.

    All the best,

    Scott

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    Decoding Nazi Secrets part 2

    Script:

    At Bletchley Park, there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War. Many here had never seen a code before, yet it was their job to find a way to crack Enigma. In the process, they devised ingenious codebreaking machines that were forerunners of the modern computer. But everything they did remained classified for 30 years.

    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello once again. This is part 2 of a 2 part posting. I have reworked this recording and hope it is now in good shape. The text is too long for a 60 second upload. I tried some new settings. There might be some pumping due to the gating but I hope is sounds OK. Anyone with good ears and monitors please let me know about the Audio Quality. Thanks in advance for your suggestions, advice and critique! All the best, Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28675.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    First let me say I haven't heard Part 1 (since you mention this is Part 2) so I'm going by what's in this post.

    I like the sound of your voice for this type of VO. It's relaxed, even yet nicely modulated. The tempo of the read seems just right.

    I may be bucking the trend here, I don't come away knowing what the point of the text was. That is, the sentences are well modulated but I'm not getting a sense of the point made in each sentence.

    The biggest example is right at the beginning. You emphasize "there", but IMHO "astonishing exploits" is the subject, and in fact "there" could even be left out of the sentence, since it's the same as "Bletchley Park". Another example is "codebreaking machines that were forerunners..." The pause between "machines" and "that" confuses me. Is the subject "codebreaking machines" or "computer"?

    Again, this is just my opinion. It's definitely a good read, and your voice is really excellent for it.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the comment. I will have a listen to what you pointed out.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Back to top
    Decoding Nazi Secrets

    Script:

    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of western Europe. Hitler was tightening the noose around Britain. In the Atlantic, German U-boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a secret weapon, the strangest military establishment in the world. Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors, Americans and British, all came here with one common aim: to unlock the secrets of the Enigma, a machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. If Enigma could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance. At Bletchley Park, there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War. Many here had never seen a code before, yet it was their job to find a way to crack Enigma. In the process, they devised ingenious codebreaking machines that were forerunners of the modern computer. But everything they did remained classified for 30 years.

    88 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear mhare11's recording

    Mostly interested in performance, but will take any and all feedback. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-97875/script-recording-94253.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm a World War II history buff. Would love to narrate a WWII documentary.

    I like the serious tone. Heard a few breaths during some of your pauses but overall, a good read.

    Peer Feedback:

    I really liked your pacing, especially the way it increased in the sentence beginning with "crossword fanatics..." It kept the list moving forward. Your tone was spot on for the material and an overall good read. Very nice.

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    Decoding Nazi Secrets

    Script:

    Decoding Nazi Secrets
    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of western Europe. Hitler was tightening the noose around Britain. In the Atlantic, German U-boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a secret weapon, the strangest military establishment in the world. Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors, Americans and British, all came here with one common aim: to unlock the secrets of the Enigma, a machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. If Enigma could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance. At Bletchley Park, there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War. Many here had never seen a code before, yet it was their job to find a way to crack Enigma.

    24 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Here is the Decoding Nazi Secrets REPOST. The Audience this time is for a documentary on TV. I read it slightly faster than I would have liked to have done, however I wanted everything to fit into the sixty second limit. Thanks again for your comments, suggestions and criticisms. All the best, Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28639.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your tone is much better in this one from the first read you did. But you DID start to fall into the more casual and 'fictional feel' later in the script. You also read "Betchley" instead of "Bletchley" along the way. You apply advice/direction/suggestion well. That's important. Important consideration...documentary reads are not commercial reads- this could have been slowed (as you state you wished to do) and been 1:15:234 a read since it is not a commercial. Something to consider as you do these scripts: consider the audience and the venue.

    I like your voice. And I like that you're willing to listen to critique and come back swinging. That's really something you need to do: practice often and have a thick skin.

    Kudos.

    Peer Feedback:

    Scott --
    Great voice, and beautiful fit for narration. Nicely done.
    I liked your walk through the "strangest military establishment" list.
    Tom's right on the "Bletchly" miss. Time for a pickup.

    I could see this read cut up to narrate vintage WWII film clips, so flow isn't a big deal, IMHO, in this case.

    Nicely done.

    PS: I think you could eliminate some of the room noise. But that's a production issue, not performance.

    Peer Feedback:

    Beautiful voice and diction, but I can hear you listening to yourself. The result is a somewhat self-conscious, very careful/measured read. I deal with the same challenge on a constant basis. I also noticed you getting into a redundant pattern of going down, pitch-wise, at the end of every sentence and/or phrase. Try just telling the story, rather than worrying about how gorgeous your voice sounds. You've already got that in spades.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hello! Thanks for all of the comments and suggestions.

    I will still work on this read and repost again later, perhaps in 2 separate files so that I can read the entire text (some which is not here).

    I have worked on reducing the Room Noise but am not sure how to eliminate it. Thought that it was in control. Any suggestions???

    Thanks again.

    All the best,

    Scott

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    Decoding Nazi Secrets

    Script:

    Decoding Nazi Secrets
    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of western Europe. Hitler was tightening the noose around Britain. In the Atlantic, German U-boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a secret weapon, the strangest military establishment in the world. Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors, Americans and British, all came here with one common aim: to unlock the secrets of the Enigma, a machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. If Enigma could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance. At Bletchley Park, there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War. Many here had never seen a code before, yet it was their job to find a way to crack Enigma.

    34 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hey! I hope this one has not become too boring, as I have posted the same text a number of times before. But this is a new read where I try to be more serious sounding. The Noise Issue is still there. Will be working on that in the next few weeks. But now, the main focus is on the performance. Any comments are most appreciated.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28996.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Scott...I stopped at "mathmaticians" because this was very choppy. Start and stop, start and stop. Your tone was good, but the delivery was not. Listen for a smooth flow in this and try to imagine this not sounding like a William Shatner delivery without the exaggerated inflections he does...just the same start and stop delivery.

    Your voice is very good, but the delivery suffered here.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Tom,

    Thank for your comment. I appreciate the feedback.

    Would you do me a favor and go to YouTube. Find part 1 of 12 of World War II Mind of a Code Breaker, and listen to the first 2 minutes of the documentary.

    I was trying to follow the pace and style of the narrator who did this one on Nova.

    Did he do a bad job or was it just my interpretation of his read that needs correction?

    I really need to know how to do this correctly if I ever expect to get work in the documentary field. Thanks again for your comments and for your time.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    OK, after hearing what you're aiming at, I still think you were a bit choppy. The guy on the original did have a 'phrase here and a phrase there' going on, but you're cutting the phrases up..."the strangest military establishment ...in the WORld." is a good example of what I was/am trying to illustrate. The original had a more even tone as well....fewer up ticks in inflection.

    I personally think you could do this read very well if you were aiming for the original, but you would need to keep the inflections more monotone compared to this one and also keep the phrases more connected. Good clear voice as I've heard from you consistently. Hope this makes sense.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Tom,

    Thanks for taking the time to check out the YouTube link. I will have a listen to his and to mine and work on the choppiness.

    I remember getting one comment from another talent on the site, to a previous posting, and he suggested there should be more mystery in the read. So, I tried to make it a little more dramatic, but probably went over with the inflection and pauses.

    Thanks again for your insight.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Scott,
    I've just listened to your delivery and read the comments. You're a good reader but what is obvious to me is that you are prone to reading phrases as sentences. Read the sentence not the phrase. Ciao.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Scott,

    I really enjoyed the resonance of your voice. My only other comment is about phrasing. It did sound a bit "start and stop" as others have said. Something I've been working on to smooth out my sound is to pretend that there is no punctuation. After recording a few times you'll probably be able to find moments where punctuation will add to the read, rather than detract.

    Best,
    Steven

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    Decoding Nazi Secrets

    Script:

    Decoding Nazi Secrets
    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of western Europe. Hitler was tightening the noose around Britain. In the Atlantic, German U-boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a secret weapon, the strangest military establishment in the world. Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors, Americans and British, all came here with one common aim: to unlock the secrets of the Enigma, a machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. If Enigma could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance. At Bletchley Park, there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War. Many here had never seen a code before, yet it was their job to find a way to crack Enigma.

    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Posting this for comments on Performance and Recording Quality, after comments from a coach and great technical help from Nodo and knm! Or is it knm and Nodo? Thanks to both for the great detective work!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28612.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The tone sounds like you're reading to children in a way and not to adults. Your upward inflection at "But Churchill had a secret weapon" makes this sound like a fiction read and not a historical read. I quit listening at that point. Give this a dour, serious delivery and you will do it more justice.

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm going to concur with TxTom regarding the tone you've chosen for your performance. I just don't think it matches the copy at all. The beginning of the copy is describing a very dire situation for the Allies, I think your read should try to capture some of that tension and desperation. The Enigma Code DESPERATELY needs to be decoded. I would shoot for some hope and wonder in the last part of the read as this "strange" military establishment assembled to crack the code. You've got a terrific voice for this kind of copy, with a more dire and serious performance I think you could really rock this kind of copy!! PS... A minor nitpick, your pronunciation of "Allied" was off. You said "Alloyed" in your read. I'm sure it was just an oversight, but wanted to give you a heads up!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Tom for the comment. When I recorded it, I was picturing my teenage students at the school where I teach. I will consider giving it another rendition for a "real" documentary sound.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Given that you were mentally targeting a younger audience, this tone makes more sense, but I still think a more dramatic and serious tone would be more effective even at the middle school/high school level audience. Vocally, you're good and clear. I just thought the tone was off. Good luck!

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm glad you told us the audience, I knew that before listening and it made a difference to the way I heard it. That could easily be a teen / jr high, or high school video. I watched thousands of them and they were terrible! That brings up a good point. I'm going to start to put my audience in there if it's not obvious.

    GREAT work on the sound! 1000% better. WELL DONE KNM, who heard the problem and described what to look for (an autogain somewhere in the chain) and you for hunting down the problem. I helped a little, mostly trying to determine where the sound was in the mix and trying to eliminate it, were it not eliminate-able, but you guys solved the problem. Community effort.

    Peer Feedback:

    OK! I will repost for an Adult audience that would be watching a Documentary.

    Thanks for the comments and suggestions and help.

    All the best,

    Scott

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    Decoding Nazi Secrets

    Script:

    Decoding Nazi Secrets
    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of western Europe. Hitler was tightening the noose around Britain. In the Atlantic, German U-boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a secret weapon, the strangest military establishment in the world. Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors, Americans and British, all came here with one common aim: to unlock the secrets of the Enigma, a machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. If Enigma could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance. At Bletchley Park, there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War. Many here had never seen a code before, yet it was their job to find a way to crack Enigma.

    29 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello once again. Still working on getting this Documentary style read down. Same script - different tempo. Perhaps it is too fast now, but it is clearly not so broken up. Thoughts and comments are welcome on performance and Recording quality. Adjusting the noise gate again and I think it worked better but I need better ears than mine. Thanks for your time. Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-29030.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Scott. Definitely better on the phrasing. I know the original which inspired you to do this read and all, so I have a clue where you're aiming. As said, the phrases are more connected and that alone improves the read tremendously.

    Coming from (as I do) an upbringing that took me from Georgia to South Carolina to Ohio to Louisiana to Texas ...I've been around a few local dialects and ways of speaking. AND..we all have TV. ;-) That being said, I would say here that some your inflections through the read seem a bit unnatural in going up where it just doesn't quite feel/sound natural to my ears. Keep in mind that this just my own opinion and it's based on how *I* 'hear' the read in my own head/imagination. "But Churchill had a secret weapon" is an example where I hear an unnatural up-tick where it would have been better to stay neutral or even go down in inflection. You go up frequently during this read and while it's good to vary the inflection to avoid monotone, going up too much also detracts. If there's a rule or standard as to how often to inflect up against down, I don't know. I've read some people say that a read is too sing-song or 'roller-coaster' in execution...this might be one they would apply to this read.

    All in all: good voice control and excellent tightening of the phrases. I would just encourage bringing down the up-ticks a bit and see how that sounds to you. Nice improvement.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Scott you definitely made an effort to improve and did so. You are still clinging to vocal fluctuations. The first two sentences is how the entire read should sound. Listen to them and compare them to subsequent sentences. You'll start seeing what's happening. Ciao

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks guys for the observations. I will check it out and have a listen again.

    All the best,

    Scott

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    Deer

    Script:

    The deer approaches the opening, unaware of the cougar's presence. Slowly and quietly, Shuka creeps toward his prey. Hearing a twig crack, the deer turns and faces impending danger. There is no time to run before the six-foot-long, 200 pound male cougar pounces on its back and bites its neck. The deer, a favorite food of the cougar has met its match. He has fallen victim to the balance of nature.

    70 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear michelleann227's recording

    I tried to get rid of the background noise but didn't have any luck :/ I probably just need better equipment... Please let me know what you think of the read :)

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-137921/script-recording-104450.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like that you use your natural storytelling instincts to make a potentially boring script (I'm thinking of watching Animal Planet back in science class and nearly falling asleep to these animal documentaries) more interesting!

    However near the last half of the script, particularly the last two sentences, I would reconsider the tone, as it almost seems like you are glad that Bambi just got mauled to death. I think it can still be an exciting narration without being sinister.

    I would also consider going back to scan for key words to hit, (ex. "unaware", "creeps", etc) Also, be mindful to articulate "Time to run" as is comes off as "time'narun".

    Great energy for this read:)

    Peer Feedback:

    Great storing telling. The speed a tab bit fast, this is a book right? Sound and performance was dead on though. Keep at it doing good.

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    Deer

    Script:

    The deer approaches the opening, unaware of the cougar's presence. Slowly and quietly, Shuka creeps toward his prey. Hearing a twig crack, the deer turns and faces impending danger. There is no time to run before the six-foot-long, 200 pound male cougar pounces on its back and bites its neck. The deer, a favorite food of the cougar has met its match. He has fallen victim to the balance of nature.

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear MusicJunkieK1's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-131/script-recording-56260.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This isn't your first posting here, but I can't get your other three to come up except your first one. While your recording quality has improved from the first one, this read sounds as if you're concentrating on keeping your voice as low as you can. It sounds too deliberate. There are pauses where punctuation wouldn't dictate and it sounds unnatural as a result. Relax and speak to someone...anyone. This completely sounds read...and far too deliberately.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with TX. It lacks emotion and nuance. Best.

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    Demo Script

    Script:

    Hi! You have reached the realm of EPIC GAMING!! Blizzard Entertainment is dedicated to bringing the best possible gaming experiences to your fingertips!
    If you would like to speak to one of our Goblin associates, who will listen if you mention money, about World of Warcraft, press 1.
    If you would like to speak to one of our Zerg representatives, who won't understand a thing you're saying and want to eat you, about Starcraft 2, press 2.
    If you would like to speak to a regular person about any "other" platform from the Blizzard universe, press 3.

    Delicious, delectable, and soothing. Chocolate, which is created from the Cacao bean, is said to have originated in the Amazon at least 4,000 years ago. The Aztecs were so enthralled with the bean that they attributed its creation to their god Quetzalcoatl who, as the legend goes, descended from heaven on a beam of a morning star bearing a cacao tree stolen from paradise.

    The Sun is the superpower of our Solar System - a thermonuclear blast furnace.
    It's an infernal sphere, of mostly hydrogen and helium, superheated into a plasma, that burns at
    millions of degrees.
    In one second the Sun churns out more energy than has been used in all of human civilization, and has been doing so for billions of years!

    Eithel govannen o en coe...Well met, from Middle Earth! We are about to embark on a journey filled with the amazing locations, sights, and scenes that made Lord of the Rings so spectacular. First up; the Glenorchy tour, where we'll explore the filming locations of Ilthilien, Isengard, and Fangorn Forest. For LOTR fans, this is Paradise!

    The biggest of all fish. 30 tonnes in weight, 12 metres long - the whale shark. Its huge bulk is sustained by microscopic creatures - plankton. Whale sharks cruise on regular, habitual routes year-round to feed on these tiny organisms.
    In February, that takes them to the surface waters far from the coast of Venezuela. Others are already here. Bait fish have come for the same reason - to feed on the plankton.

    63 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear briank411's recording

    Umpteenth rendition for the demo! lol I slowed down and threw out the time limitation that I was concerned with. I still managed to get it at 2:17 so I'm pretty excited with the script lengths. I also tried to have differentiation between each script as well as having fun doing them!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-141905/script-recording-104557.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The final fish script sounded like your natural voice, as if you were talking to a person. it was my favorite.

    Peer Feedback:

    Consistency good. Enjoyed listening to this. Well done.

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    Dinosaur 2

    Script:

    They were awesome creatures, the great reptiles of eons and eras past. To modern eyes, they appear magnificent ... grotesque ... and terrifying. And in fact, it seems inconceivable that their dominance of the planet could ever have ended. But end it did ... at the hands of an even mightier adversary: Change. It was, of course, nature that dealt the most severe blows. Over the yawning ages, the great beasts were beset in turn by drought ... by flood ... by fire ... and ultimately, by ice. Nimbler, more resourceful species were able to adapt to these catastrophically shifting conditions, and survived. But the colossal reptiles were simply too ponderous, too inflexible to adapt.

    75 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear hushpanda's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-169848/script-recording-108194.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds good...except that it should be 'the' colossal and NOT 'these' colossal...

    All the very best!

    Peer Feedback:

    You end each phrase almost exactly the same way. Try to vary this up a bit with pitch and inflection. This will help keep the read from sounding like you are simply reading off a page. Think about each phrase/sentence as a whole and try to present it as such.

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    Dinosaurs

    Script:

    The evidence that birds descended from dinosaurs - indeed are dinosaurs - has become conclusive for most paleontologists and evolutionary biologists. The theory had fallen out of favor in the early 20th century because, although theropods and birds share a great many features, no dinosaurs appeared to have a furcula, or wishbone.

    96 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear adraeger's recording

    I want to include this in a new demo. Grateful if you could comment on recording quality as well as performance.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-94086/script-recording-79001.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Marjorie, I did have some problem with the word "wishbone!"

    Peer Feedback:

    There were way too many breaths and too much mouth noise for this to be on a demo. You want to leave in breaths for longer narrative bits, but not that many. That's a lot of editing too, so you may want to find a couple places specifically to breathe at. I only need two to get through it. I'm sure there are those who could do it quite naturally on one.

    Then I thought some of the words you hit were a bit off and gave it too much sing song and/or punch. Not all of them, but they didn't seem to fit together, or always add to the piece. Or at least I think there were better choices to make, and a way to make them smoother and more use them more sparingly. This is a rather informative piece of copy, and while there may have been some drama, I don't know that playing into all of it is the way to go for such a short piece. You don't have to totally hit a word in each sentence. You would be exhausted by the end of the whole thing, and so would we be! :)

    You have a great voice!

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked this read. I liked the pace.
    the shorts breaths made it sound like it was one take....eh?

    you need a quieter recording space - there's too much room noise.
    I wasn't put off by the breathing, because it seemed to me that the phrasing and pauses were natural and delivery was easy to follow.

    nice job.
    cheers,
    DS

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    Disc Demolition

    Script:

    Count your damaged and unwanted CDs and DVDs. Multiply by millions of folks like you. Add in the business world’s used data CDs and music, video game, and movie returns. The total is billions of trashed discs a year. How do you keep them out of the landfill?

    Some recycling firms buy big batches of discs from businesses. The prize is the polycarbonate plastic covering the reflective data layer. Typically, a chemical bath removes ink, lacquer, and aluminum. The plastic is then melted and molded into eyeglass frames, car parts, and fences. Alas, says Darby Hoover of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the eco-impact of these steps is “hard to track” – especially at facilities in China.

    Big-time recyclers aren’t as interested in an individual’s wee array of bum discs. San Francisco is one of the few American cities that picks up CDs curbside for recycling. If you don’t mind paying postage, you can mail your discs to GreenDisk or CD Recycling Center of America. If you do mind, be patient: Drop-off boxes are arriving at some chain stores.

    Another option is to revive damaged discs. The Disc-Go-Devil device gets rid of scratches by buffing the plastic surface. Video-rental firms use the technology; stores may soon offer it. So marred CDs and DVDs can live on until the day when all media is downloaded. By then there should be safe, convenient ways to recycle discs.

    32 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear angel.chan's recording

    I'm mainly interested on feedback on my delivery and performance. The recording itself has some issues (low, incessant hum coming from my computer, et. al.) which I need to work on. Any feedback is welcome.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-265/script-recording-25771.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Vocal performance - pacing is too choppy. The emotion wasn't clear to me...sounds like you just read the script. I didn't hear a smile. Not a very good read yet.

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    Discovery Channel - "When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth"

    Script:

    In nature, disaster is a constant companion and death comes in many guises. Dinosaurs now trapped by the fire - flee in panic. Most will survive, but for the creatures that perish, the conflict is over. For those that remain, what lies ahead is 30 million years of evolution. Triggered by unseen forces, the environment will gradually change and so will the dinosaurs that live here. In the distant future, the offspring of the young femikas will grow bigger, weirder and even more perplexing. The raptors will stay small, agile and quick, but they’ll get smarter and the kin of the Steggasours will become the most famous creature in North America.

    40 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear SODay's recording

    All feedback welcome. Practice recording from my phone.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-141797/script-recording-101843.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your pacing. The inflection of descriptive words helped the imagination to go where you were taking us. You have a good voice for narratives. The recording quality was good and as stated, so was the performance. Nice job!

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    DISCOVERY CHANNEL – “When Dinosaurs ruled the earth”

    Script:

    In nature, disaster is a constant companion / and death comes in many guises. Dinosaurs now trapped by the fire flee in panic. Most will survive, but for the creatures that parish, the conflict is over.

    For those that remain / what lies ahead is 30 million years of evolution. Triggered by unseen forces the environment will gradually change and so will the dinosaurs that live here. In the distant future the offspring of the young femikas will grow bigger, weirder and even more perplexing. The raptors will stay small, agile, and quick, but they’ll get smarter and the kin of the Stagasours will become the most famous creature in North America.

    78 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear mayastine's recording

    I've noticed a lot of mouth noises in my recordings recently, any recommendations for how to reduce them?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-153074/script-recording-107461.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Recording quality is okay, though I detect some room tone that you might want to look into treating. Watch out for mouth clicks and plosives!

    The performance is clean & relaxed which is good, but it comes across as speaking, instead of speaking "to" someone, which is an important distinction. Drawing the audience into the narration means making it personal, and I think you could work on improving that aspect of your performance.

    One possible way of doing this is to record your own daily conversations. If you have a smart phone with a record feature (most do) you can just turn it on as you go about meeting other people in your day. The quality doesn't have to be good and obviously you shouldn't use this for any other purpose than personal improvement in voice over, but listening to yourself like this - without the pressure of interpreting a script - sets a bar to compare your script reading against and make adjustments to sound more naturalistic.

    The other thing I noticed was that your voice settled into one particular rhythm which repeated itself. The previous exercise will help alleviate this, but it's something to be aware of and actively counter by switching up your speech patterns (ascending, descending, steady, circumflex).

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi mayastine, I agree with Dubois on needing to treat the room for recording... or you could head into a closet full of clothes and give that a try as it will tend to reduce sound reflection. Yes and plosives ... we all can have issues with that ... a simple pop filter in front of the microphone can help with that. Lastly mouth noise ... happens to allot of us. Make sure to stay hydrated as that can help reduce mouth noise. Hope that helps!

    Peer Feedback:

    Mouth clicks are a problem for everyone. Hydration is #1. drink lots of water - not just when you are recording but all day. After that, some people find eating a piece of green apple helps, chewing gum for a minute, brushing your teeth before you record, moving back from your mic a bit - all things to try.

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    Documenary Practice

    Script:

    World War II…a desperate time when humans found new and more terrible ways of killing each other. Out of this desperation, came the Japanese suicide bomber, known as the Kamikaze. To the Kamikaze, bomb and bomber were one and the same. They were willing to guide their planes into targets in the name of the Emperor. They were told, they’d become gods. Now, for the first time, in all color, a look at the men who were willing to embrace death and the devastation and agony they caused. These are the Kamikazes.

    In the final ten months of World War II, the Empire of the Rising Sun was in dire circumstances. As a last ditch weapon, Japanese admirals and generals, directed over 2500 men to forefeit their lives as part of organized suicide missions. The world remembers them today, collectively, as Kamikazes.

    The toll of the Kamikazes was terrible. Scores of Allied ships were sunk or damaged beyond repair. Many more were damaged badly enough to take them out of the war. More than 7,000 Allied service men and women lost their lives due to the aerial suicide bombings from the advent of the Kamikaze Corp. Tens of thousands more were wounded, incredible suffering caused by just 2500 Kamikaze pilots. Incalculable damage to families on all sides of the war. Girls and boys lost their fathers. Mothers, whose sons would never come home.

    These Kamikazes leave behind a bitter and torchered legacy. They sacrificed themselves for an ideal, but in vain. Their name means “Divine Wind”. They were to blow back the invaders. The wind was strong, but did not prevail. (2:58-3:05)

    The first Devine Wind squads were formed in October of 1944…and based out of Clark Airfield, in the Japanese occupied Phillipine Islands. They were officially dubbed, The Special Attack Force. Upon the decision to form the unit, Air Fleet Commander in Chief, Takijiro Onishi, called for volunteers from the flyers of the 201st Air Group, who were not family men. The entire unit volunteered. They would fly their missions until none of them were left. Onishi swore to follow them. These volunteers were a tremendous roadblock to the Allies plan to take the Phillipines back. As the Battle of Leyte Gulf began on October 22, fear and panic reigned on the American side, because indeed, there was little defense against the new Kamikaze squads

    65 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear kenbond's recording

    Practicing documentary reads. Passionate about sports and history (especially World War II) so that's why I chose to do this WWII documentary sample. The one I've posted has background music. I have the same recording without music. Which one should I use for critiques or if posting as a demo? Let me know your thoughts as well comments on the performance. Thanks.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113659/script-recording-102275.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your pace and tone. The music track also works nicely. Recording quality is good and your voice is clear and concise. Good Luck.

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    Dogs ASAP Science

    Script:

    Unlike what many people think, dogs aren't completely color blind. While we have three specialized receptors in our eyes to distinguish colors, dogs only have two and thus only see black, white, blue, and yellow. Meanwhile their brains don't interpret red and green but instead see grey.

    77 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Mark Lee's recording

    Looking mostly for performance feedback, quality is definitely a bit on the iffy side for now and currently in the midst of fixing it.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-106735/script-recording-89338.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Mark the recording quality sounded pretty clear and crisp. The main thing that jumps out at me is your delivery. It's almost too precise and educational sounding, almost as if you're talking to a room full of science students. I would try and make it more conversational and interesting to connect with the listener on a more intimate level, even though the subject matter deals with scientific facts about how/what dogs see. You've got a great voice, just relax your voice a bit and find motivated reasons and places in the script to take beats, and add vocal inflection to invoke more meaning behind the words. Keep up the great work!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Tucker, that's definitely my main issue with my deliveries is sounding more casual and conversational with them. Will keep it in mind, thanks!

    Peer Feedback:

    You have a good voice. Just keep practicing, relaxing, and being more conversational. It did seem a little choppy, but with practice, you can smooth it out. Maybe imagine that you're talking to a friend sitting across from you.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Bill, will keep in mind!

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    Dolphins

    Script:

    Gliding with uncanny grace, bottlenose dolphins pass the scalloped shadow of a mountain peak in Fiordland, New Zealand's largest national park. Fiordland's dolphins may spend their entire lives in a single fiord -- denizens of an isolated world as dramatic above water as it is below. The jutting fist of Mitre Peak snags a passing cloud high above Milford Sound. Rising more than a mile up from the sea, this peak is the icon of a land with a history of transient seekers -- for sealskins, gold, the glory of discovery, and the solace of untrammeled wilderness.

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Brian C. Topping's recording

    This is a second take with a different approach. I welcome all feedback. Thank you!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2061/script-recording-34061.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Brian --
    I like this read better. No pops at all...you've solved that problem.
    the production sounded very clear.
    All traces of an East Cost accent is literally gone IMHO...wow. you've completely lost the regional-ness.

    This was a really nice read.
    No sing-songy-ness, and a confident delivery.
    Some might argue about the pace or flatness or conversational-ness, but I'm sticking with this is a very nice job, and could be a decent audition.

    congrats, DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Brian, this one's so much better when it comes to feeling "transporting"......
    I loved how you started, you've automatically taken me to that beautiful scenery discribed in the first line.......then I lost it for a little bit... it would be great if you had gone a tiny bit slower so that we could process and enjoy the trip??
    You have a lovely voice here, were you comfortable when reading it? I mean enjoying it?
    I find this read amazingly beautiful in content.....

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree its better,, all the things they said above, and the harsh sound to the tone is gone as well.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hi Brian,
    Really nice improvement! I'm with Eva, I think we need just a bit more time to process. Great job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks so much. I actually found the pictures of the Peak and the dolphins by searching the script itself. Then I had a brainstorm to listen to some music from the English Patient soundtrack while reading. I don't know if it's a recommended practice, but your feedback certainly suggests something clicked! I hope I can keep it going! Thank you!

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    Dolphins

    Script:

    Gliding with uncanny grace, bottlenose dolphins pass the scalloped shadow of a mountain peak in Fiordland, New Zealand's largest national park. Fiordland's dolphins may spend their entire lives in a single fiord -- denizens of an isolated world as dramatic above water as it is below. The jutting fist of Mitre Peak snags a passing cloud high above Milford Sound. Rising more than a mile up from the sea, this peak is the icon of a land with a history of transient seekers -- for sealskins, gold, the glory of discovery, and the solace of untrammeled wilderness.

    26 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Brian C. Topping's recording

    Thanks for any feedback.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-2061/script-recording-34042.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Your voice has a nice tone to it, but your mix puts a bit of a harsh edge to it,, its not a warm sound, which I would think you would want for this. The read was a bit "ready" to me. Like "of a mountain peak in Fiordland" was very unatural . By this read,, I may get some of the facts,, but none of the emotions. Now depending on the purpose behind a read, styles have their place,, but by the subject matter, I would think this to be a read, looking to express a feeling.

    Peer Feedback:

    Brian, I think this was a great read for an Animal Planet type of documentary. I believe you were going for that in your read. If you relaxed a bit more and brought the pitch back a bit I think you are right on the money. Can't find fault with the read itself, good job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Brian --
    I like it. I can see the "Discover Channel" trajectory in this read. nicely done.
    Really clear voice track. You've spent some time and money upgrading your home studio it seems, and it really shows (I remember your "room noise-ier" reads months ago).
    Also this read had a nice, clear, flattish style to it, -- just like you see regularly on the Discover Channel.

    Regarding the production -- lots of P pops...probably need to back off the mic a little (personally, I use 2 pop filters back to back, because I'm just a puffy, poppy, person, I suPPose....haha, alliteration).
    good or bad, I can still pick up a little New Yawk accent -- but it's becoming less and less.

    Nice job,
    DS.

    Peer Feedback:

    This is the first read of yours I listen to. I like your voice, tone... it's pleasant to listen.
    What is the purpose behind the read? What were you thinking when reading?? Informing? Describing? If so, where you in the place at the time of the read (imaginarily speaking)?... I personally would have liked more feeling to it. Imagine the place and scenary you describe...you want to transport us to that which you are describing through this read..... we need to feel the excitement, magnificence, beauty, freshness .......I've not felt that.
    I believe that if you can imagine the place, "transport" yourself to it and read it from there....we'd be amazed at how differently you'd read and enjoy sharing it with us!
    I'd encourage to try that and post it, it's not going to be disappointing!

    Peer Feedback:

    Brian,
    Great voice. I would suggest more emotion and slow it down a little. What you are describing is amazing and maybe we should hear that in your voice.

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    Dolphins

    Script:

    Dolphins
    Gliding with uncanny grace, bottlenose dolphins pass the scalloped shadow of a mountain peak in Fiordland, New Zealand's largest national park. Fiordland's dolphins may spend their entire lives in a single fiord -- denizens of an isolated world as dramatic above water as it is below. The jutting fist of Mitre Peak snags a passing cloud high above Milford Sound. Rising more than a mile up from the sea, this peak is the icon of a land with a history of transient seekers -- for sealskins, gold, the glory of discovery, and the solace of untrammeled wilderness.

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Trying out this recording with some sfx to see if I could make a nice effect. Did it work? How was the pacing? Thanks for any and all comments. Scott

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-30226.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Totally LOVED the sound effects. The whippoorwill coming in right at the break was beautiful. I really liked the tone of your voice with the tone of the music too. I didn't listen with the script, but didn't hear anything mispronounced.
    There was something, While you didn't seem particularly rushed, groups of words came out a little muddy, I couldn't exactly hear what your were saying or maybe maybe just sharpen the enucnciation a little bit.. But with a video? Oh man, 100% Nice job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks Nodo for the feedback. I will check out the voice and see where it could be more clear. Appreciate the feedback!

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    It sounded like it should sound. Three thumbs up!

    Peer Feedback:

    Love your voice....loved the read thank you

    Peer Feedback:

    I really enjoyed this read. I felt like I was in school watching a video in class. I did detect a bit of muddieness as NODO24 called it that competed with the music just a touch, but again, this read had me exactly where I suspect the author wanted me. attentive and anticipating.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Jim Babbitt. Made me curious about New Zealand.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks to everyone for your encouragement! I appreciate hearing your feedback.

    Will have to check into the muddiness question.

    All the best,

    Scott

    Peer Feedback:

    Just want to weigh in here again... Scott, don't read too much into the comment. It's hard to define and as S.pointed out, it's probably a juxtaposition of the music and the phrases... Like I said, I didn't listen with a script, and hey, it's 99.9 percent fine. Really good man!

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    Dublin

    Script:

    James Joyce once said that he wanted to create a picture of Dublin so complete that if the city one day disappeared, it could be reconstructed entirely from his book Ulysses. He succeeded. The spirit of James Joyce is evident everywhere in bustling, booming modern Dublin, from the bronze statue of him leaning casually on his walking stick at the intersection of busy O’Connell Street and Earl Street to such famous landmarks as St. Stephen’s Green, University College, and the Martello Tower in the nearby suburb of Sandycove. With a bit of imagination and some good walking shoes, you can virtually step into the pages of Ulysses to follow Leopold Bloom on his fictional 18-hour odyssey through Dublin on June 16, 1904.

    43 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear SODay's recording

    Any feedback welcome, thanks! Just a practice recording from my phone.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-141797/script-recording-101842.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Beautiful read. I would have emphasized/de-emphasized a word or two different than you but probably a personal choice so I’m not going to call them out. Very nice!

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    Earthquake

    Script:

    Pulled and pushed by forces deep within the planet, the Pacific plate is sliding northwest past North America at an average of about 2 inches a year - roughly the same rate as fingernails grow.
    But movement along the fault usually occurs in bursts. Along most of the fault, the colder, more rigid rocks near the earth's surface resist the plate motions. Eventually, enough strain develops along a segment of the fault to overcome the resistance. Then, in geologic terms, that stretch of the fault "breaks," "fails," or "ruptures" and a segment of the crust riding the Pacific plate surges north, creating an earthquake.
    In the magnitude 7.7 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which killed more than 3000 people...............................

    107 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Yakkity-Yak's recording

    New mic, new interface, new voice, etc...........

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-83898/script-recording-97316.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The mic is good.....try to edit out the parts where you seem to take a deep breath. It is very noticible. The voice is good for the genre. Also find points within the text to emphasize or change your tone. Thanks for the post and good luck.

    Peer Feedback:

    There are times to edit out breaths and times to leave them for a natural reading flow. For commercial reads, breaths are almost always edited out to keep to short time constraints. For narration...not so much. For audiobooks especially. But if you're narrating a video...the breaths are going to be eliminated because there's often a music bed to cover the edits etc. This is a narration for a video program. Editing those breaths would be advisable, but leave space for video to pass underneath so the read doesn't feel/seem crammed together or rushed.

    Peer Feedback:

    Being new to this business, your comments and critiques are appreciated. tsaulsberry, and TxTom, I shall do a better editing job on breaths. Especially on commercial reads. Your comments are important as I am working toward my demo.

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    Earthquakes - Low Volume Read

    Script:

    All around the world, mountains are on the rise. And it doesn’t happen more swiftly, than in highly populated Southern California, where shifting tectonic plates cause periodic catastrophe. Each earthquake raises the mountains a few inches, sometimes feet, which makes the place a Mecca for geothermologists like Dr. Frank Wireick.

    But the mountains here are falling, as fast as they are rising. Days of rain sometimes trigger a disaster called a rotational slide, because it moves along a subsurface plain, like jelly sliding from a spoon. In this small town along the coastline, most residents were warned of the dangers before moving in, but chose to live here anyway due to the panoramic view.

    66 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear sterng66's recording

    Trying a new genre, what do you think?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-118662/script-recording-101701.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Let's get recording quality out of the way first. I'm not sure if you've started thinking about your home studio setup yet, but I heard a significant amount of echo and background noise in the recording itself -- mainly what appeared to be a constant hissing/humming (fan noise?). Fine for the feedback forum, but obviously something to watch out for once you go pro.

    Onto the performance itself, I think you have a good timbre and a warm overall sound, but I feel like you could stand to vary your tempo a bit, particularly in that third sentence in the first passage. Near commas, try adding a half-second pause in order to break up the various clauses.

    Good work, and keep at it! :)

    Peer Feedback:

    I challenge you to find the important words in the sentence or phrase and hit those. I think you mis-inflected at least 4 or 5 times. Example. "....mountains are on the RISE"..hit Rise, don't throw it away. Mountains RISING?! that's unexpected and amazing! play to that.

    "Each earthquake raises the mountains a few inches, sometimes feet..." Again, I would hit 'inches' and 'feet' because they amplify or even juxtapose each other.

    there are others. Remember that inflection is like adding spice to the recipe - less is more, so use it correctly and sparingly.
    Script interpretation and self direction are the hardest parts to getting started.

    others already mentioned the recording quality - get that fixed asap. There is lots of info online and plenty you can do DIY and cheap to get started. Do a recording in your full clothes closet as a starter.

    hope at least some of that is helpful.
    DS.

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    Earthquakes - National Geographic

    Script:

    Pulled and pushed by forces deep within the planet, the Pacific plate is sliding northwest past North America at an average of about 2 inches a year - roughly the same rate as fingernails grow. But movement along the fault usually occurs in bursts. Along most of the fault, the colder, more rigid rocks near the earth’s surface resist the plate motions. Eventually, enough strain develops along a segment of the fault to overcome the resistance. Then, in geologic terms, that stretch of the fault "breaks," "fails," or "ruptures" and segments of the crust riding the Pacific plate surge north, creating an earthquake.

    31 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Addiction2Diction's recording

    Hello Edgers, I'm coming off a private session with Noelle Romano and was assigned, as homework, to work on this copy. My weakness during the session was that I was too choppy during the read, so this time around I've worked to make it sound smoother. Let me know what you think. Comments or advice about the sound quality would also be much appreciated as I really don't know what I'm doing with my setup. Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-56236/script-recording-60548.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    yeah, I have to agree with the choppy critique. Your pace is so uniform, that when you pause to breathe, it's VERY noticeable. If you altered your pacing during the read as you would when talking to someone face to face, it would lose some of that uniformity and the way the pauses stand out.

    Sound quality. Well...sound. Quality isn't there. You've mastered your sound to +.02db and as a result you have over a thousand clipped samples on the left and almost 500 on the right....why the difference is a good question. Unless you're reading into a stereo setup, those sides should match.

    Master your sound to -3db so you won't clip and you'll be in line with what is a de facto standard on the forum here and all the VO sites as well.

    Peer Feedback:

    You should investigate some breathing exercises so that you can string more than 3 or 4 words together before you have to take a breath - and shallow ones at that.

    I am a classically trained singer. I have been singing for over 40 years. So breathing as a singer breathes is second nature to me. Therefore it is difficult to describe in writing precisely how it's done. It's called diaphramatic breathing and isn't something that can be learned overnight. It takes months, if not years, to train your body to do properly.

    All of that said, try this exercise. Take a big. deep breath and read something until you run out of air. Mark that spot. And try again. This time aiming for further down the line. Don't worry about interpretation or inflection or anything like that. This is just to help you gain more stamina and breath control.

    After you've gone as far as you can go, without passing out, try to read just one sentence or complete thought on that one breath and add in all of the inflection and interpretation you can. You may discover that you can get further that you thought and in the process, lessen the choppiness of your reads.

    Peer Feedback:

    I've had the choppy disease, too, and I think I can tell you're working on it and making progress. I think the breathing advice is great and will help a lot. I also think there's a reading quality to this (the uniformity Tom mentions) and once you get more conversational it will help make the pauses sound more natural. Lots to like with your voice, and the clarity, and the fact that you're not getting sing-songy, and you color some words in an understated way that's working for me. Sometimes the breathing thing works itself out as you train more, too. It can be tough early when you're trying to remember a million rules and suddenly you realize you've forgotten how to breathe. That problem, to some extent, just went away for me after the first 50 hours of practice or so.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you all for the very helpful words.

    TxTom, you're right about the pacing. Listening to it again, it doesn't have the ebb and flow of a natural conversation. I'll work on that and keep it in mind during reads. On the mastering, would you happen to have any online references for basic equalizing or mastering methods?

    Jamesromick, I took vocal lessons also and I should have remembered to do those. I try to remember to breathe from my diaphragm but end up falling into bad habits. I'll try those exercises you suggested before my next read and maintain consistency.

    Tonia, thanks for noticing my emphasis on certain words, I was trying to read certain lines in a different way. I do agree that remembering the rules impacts performance, but as you say, practice only helps.

    Thanks all!

    Peer Feedback:

    The Tech-Talk call on the first Sunday of the month is often very helpful, but EQ is going to be something that will depend greatly on your recording space....does your recording space add anything to your voice that needs fixing? Does it take away from your voice and that needs to be replaced? Are you simply trying to add impact? Compression is also something that is done to practically every vocal track to some degree.

    I would suggest searching YouTube for beginner's home studio techniques and such. There's a few guys doing vlogs on the site that are extremely helpful. We try to be helpful here as well, but can you trust our advice? LOL

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    Earthquakes - National Geographic

    Script:

    Earthquakes - National Geographic
    Pulled and pushed by forces deep within the planet, the Pacific plate is sliding northwest past North America at an average of about 2 inches a year - roughly the same rate as fingernails grow. But movement along the fault usually occurs in bursts. Along most of the fault, the colder, more rigid rocks near the earth’s surface resist the plate motions. Eventually, enough strain develops along a segment of the fault to overcome the resistance. Then, in geologic terms, that stretch of the fault "breaks," "fails," or "ruptures" and segments of the crust riding the Pacific plate surge north, creating an earthquake. In the magnitude 7.7 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which killed more than 3,000 people, a 270-mile-long segment of the San Andreas fault from south of San Juan Bautista to Cape Mendocino surged northward as much as 21 feet in a few seconds. Half a century earlier in 1857, during a similar but little known 7.8 quake, much of coastal , southern California drifted north.

    21 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear lahnkd's recording

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8353/script-recording-28689.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I like your voice very much. I am a total National Geographic Channel nerd, so I could totally envision your voice in this kind of programing! One technical critique... Your pronunciation of the letter, "S" was really coming through hard, it was really hissing! Not sure if it's a production thing or a pronunciation thing on your end, but just wanted to mention it so you are aware!

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    Egypt 2

    Script:

    Egypt has always been a land of mystery and magic -- a land different from all others, difficult to understand, apart and alien, yet strangely fascinating. It was the most self-contained of all the countries of the ancient world; it lived its own life, practiced its own religion, and made up its own government with hardly any outside interference either from or upon other civilizations.

    119 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Mike Brunner's recording

    Hey guys, it's been a while since I posted. I've been practicing and developing my character voices but need to go back and practice my narration skills. I just set up my Kaotica Eyeball which has helped eliminate a lot of background sound. There are still some settings I need to change to make it sound better. This recording is on the Male Narrator preset on Adobe Soundbooth CS5. I would appreciate some suggestions from all you techies. Regarding the performance, how would you suggest to read the last bit? Thanks!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8457/script-recording-79236.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Still sounds a little echo-y to me, maybe? I'm not on headphones, so might be my end.

    For the ending, I don't think I would have hit "other" I would have hit "from" and (especially) "upon" moreso. They're talking about Egypt's pretty unique ability to thrive without fear of attack, or without imposing attacks on others. Isolated for millenia, they really just worked on themselves until the Greeks came in.

    Peer Feedback:

    Don't know a whole lot about CS5 or the presets, but it the quality sounds pretty good. There are a lot of pros and cons about the Eyeball, but it seems to be doing the trick for you. Not detecting any room echo or excess noise.

    That little pause after "Egypt" seemed a little odd. For my sensibilities, that partial sentence flows better as one thought. What I heard was a period - or at the very least a long comma - after the word and thought the next part was an incomplete sentence. Like "Egypt" was the title and the word "It" was missing from the next part. And consider "mystery and magic" as two parts of a whole without the pause. It's very alliterative with both words starting with M.

    A few muddled things along the way. "...difficult ta unerrstran..." - "Ihwuzuh mose self-containn..." - "innerference". The rest is very articulate, so for consistency sake, a little more elocutionary effort might in order.

    The subdued quality was very nice - that "voice under" quality that Nancy Wolfson talks about.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback!

    Peer Feedback:

    So I'd like to comment on performance. To my ear, and maybe this comes from watching too much History Channel, your delivery needed a bit more of an authoritative sound. What I mean by that is you had the echo effect in play and your delivery had a sense of mystic to it. (To me.) Which I suppose is just as viable an approach as any, including authoritative, History Channel-ish. From my perspective though, listening to your voice, I could definitely hear you sounding powerful by putting your voice in that character of knowledge, wisdom and expertise. I liked what you did but with that slight change up I'd have been completely hooked.

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    Email Virus Documentary

    Script:

    Yesterday, millions of people were seduced by an offer of love online. Today, the cyber promise was a joke -- with a new e-mail offering humor. But for those who responded, the joke was on them. The e-mails contained a destructive computer program -- referred to as a worm, which is a type of virus. The so-called love bug was first detected in Asia and rapidly spread through electronic mail across the globe. Experts believe it may have started in the Philippines by a 23-year old computer hacker nicknamed "Spider."

    15 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear peter.ayer89's recording

    This is my second attempt at this script. My main goal this time around was to eliminate those pesky mouth and breathing noises. I really tried to edit my recording much more precisely and professionally this time. Please let me know how I did!

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8943/script-recording-30920.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Sounds very clean to me, with the exception of the very beginning and the ending, where the final phrase repeats.

    I noticed you used a touch of reverb. Or is that room tone? I thought it would make your edits around the breaths more noticeable, but I couldn't hear any.

    I especially like your delivery of the second sentence: "was a joke!" Nice job.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you for the feedback Bill. Yeah that was room tone that you heard there. For some reason I'm still getting a teeny bit of an echo. I'm trying to figure out what that is. And wow, I didn't even realize that Garageband had added that repeat of the final phrase on me. I have no idea when it could have done that haha. I'll be sure to be much more careful the next time I post. Thank you again for the feedback.

    Peer Feedback:

    got that little edit issue at the end...and your pronunciation of 'electronic' is definitely not the norm. I hear the room as well...thought it was reverb.

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm pretty sure that Garageband adds a slight reverb if your input is set for Male Voice.

    Peer Feedback:

    All the choices except for "No Effects" have something done to the vocal on GarageBand.

    Peer Feedback:

    Ooooooh ok. That explains it. It's not the room. Garageband is what did it when I set it to male voice for the recording. Wow thank you so much for pointing that out. You just saved me a ton of hassle.

    Peer Feedback:

    I do try to help. ;-)

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    Email Virus

    Script:

    Yesterday, millions of people were seduced by an offer of love online. Today, the cyber promise was a joke -- with a new e-mail offering humor. But for those who responded, the joke was on them. The e-mails contained a destructive computer program -- referred to as a worm, which is a type of virus. The so-called love bug was first detected in Asia and rapidly spread through electronic mail across the globe. Experts believe it may have started in the Philippines by a 23-year old computer hacker nicknamed "Spider."

    18 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear peter.ayer89's recording

    This is my first post on the feedback forum. So this is basically the first shot I've taken at doing a recording by myself, so I'd like any type of feedback you can give me. How the microphone sounds, how I sound, anything and everything is fair game haha.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8943/script-recording-30530.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The sound is good. No problem there. I like your voice. But your delivery is choppy,
    with audible mouth noises. Great for a first time!

    Peer Feedback:

    Are you adding some ambiance to the recording? In the beginning it sounds like that but then gets less as the read goes on. No opinion as to whether its good or bad, just that it's noticed.
    The read is very good, but your intent also seems to change halfway thru. In the beginning it really sounded like you were going towards sarcasm, but then you got serious, so it sounded like two different reads put together. If you were attempting to change from "happy go lucky" to "woops what a mistake" I think it needs to be more subtle.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you both so much for your feedback. Yeah I would have added some ambience or music if I could have, but I'm still familiarizing myself with Garageband. So I'm not sure how to do it yet. I'm probably going to give Audacity a try.
    I'm going to take all of your advice and give this script another try. I would love it if you guys could let me know if I improve. Thank you again.

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    Enigma

    Script:

    By mid-1940, the German Army had conquered all of Western Europe ... Hitler was
    tightening the noose around Britain ... German U-Boats were decimating Allied convoys, threatening to cut off Britain's only lifeline. But Churchill had a 'secret weapon,' the
    strangest military establishment in the world!
    Crossword fanatics, chess champions, mathematicians, students and professors,
    American and British all came together with one common aim: to unlock the secret of
    "Enigma," the machine that concealed Germany's war plans in seemingly unbreakable code. Many had never seen a code before; yet it was their job to crack "Enigma."
    If "Enigma" could be penetrated, everything Hitler plotted would be known in advance!
    At Bletchley Park there unfolded one of the most astonishing exploits of the Second World War! Everything they did remained classified for 30 years!

    Script from Edge Studio's 4,851 Practice Script Library > English Adult > Narration > Documentary

    25 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Daniel.f.purcell's recording

    Coming back after a brief break. Please let me know what you think.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Enigma.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This thing is loaded with exclamation points!!!!

    My opinion? I think the writer got a little carried away. But, in a session, we (the voice actor) would never, ever say anything like that - out loud, that is.

    However, there are other ways to express the excitement that the author seems to be after without raising vocal pitch and volume. There is also a hushed, almost whispered excitement. Same energy and intensity, just less volume and almost no pitch at all. A sense of awe and amazement, like a wide-eyed, breathless child. Remember, we're talking about codes and secrets here. And how would you excitedly tell someone a secret?

    Peer Feedback:

    James,

    thank you so much. Your comments have just caused a light bulb to go off and will cause me to take a whole new approach!

    Peer Feedback:

    I like this for the most part. I hear lots of nice space that's friendly towards whomever edits and matches the video to audio. I like the slight sly tone when you bring up Churchill's secret weapon. I think I hear a little echo...? Couple spots sound over-the-top as you tried to honor the exclamation points, and James gives great advice. Nancy Wolffson in a lecture says something about it being a voice like you're in a movie theater and oh, crap, you've lost your wallet somewhere. It's urgent, you're excited, but you have to keep your voice down.

    It's a great script for practicing our documentary voices on. I might post my own "hushed excitement" version at some point.

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    56 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear raithrovers1's recording

    Better or worse? Pulled back a bit on the inflections and lowered the music bed.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113255/script-recording-92783.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Yep. I'd watch this documentary with interest. Really nice adjustment.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey Raith, really nice man! I can picture the WWII black and white video of infantry, tanks, etc. The VO w less inflection is great. Don

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback guys. Your input is valuable in getting me to where I want to be - the next David Attenborough!!!!!!!!! I can only dream!!

    Peer Feedback:

    It's definitely something (someone) to aspire to.

    Can't tell you how many auditions I've gotten that want that kind of delivery - specifically mentioning Attenborough by name.

    Peer Feedback:

    Only negative was when you said If enigma couldbe penetrated.... you combined could and be. Otherwise it was an outstanding read and delivery!!! Great job!!!

    Peer Feedback:

    Very well read ... dramatic! ... which obviously fits the script :-) ... well done.

    Peer Feedback:

    Love this. Excellent delivery, and choice and blend of music. Narration is definitely your niche. Rock on!

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    78 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear raithrovers1's recording

    Just wanted to know if this was too intense. When I read the copy it seemed to ask for that kind of read in my mind. Thanks

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-113255/script-recording-92762.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    The impression I got was that you weren't actually intense enough. Too wide ranging in your inflections where a serious ...almost monotone or very narrow range of inflection would be better to serve the copy.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey raith,
    The music bed and your voice really go well together for this type of read. Made me think of History Channel, Nat Geo, etc.
    Agree w Tom on this. The voice is def in your face, due to the inflections, where it draws away from images--assuming this is a VO for video--that need a compliment to them.
    Good work...keep it up.
    Don

    Peer Feedback:

    First of all, kudos to you! Great opening, I'm a fan.

    After the opening, possibly consider lowering the mix on the background orchestra, then bring back at the end.

    Peer Feedback:

    I mentioned this on one of your previous recordings.

    IMHO, you're working the words too hard. This may be what TxTom is getting at when he mentions that you're "too wide ranging in your inflections."

    Remember that in documentary narratives like this, the VO (or the voice artist) is not the star, the visuals and the story are.

    If, on the other hand, this were an action passage in an audiobook (with no visuals or music), you may need to "goose it up" a little with inflection, volume and pacing to move the story along.

    There is a technique that some call the "hushed whisper" (not actually a whisper though) that has intensity and energy without being full throated loud or roller coaster like in pitch and inflection. It's rather flat in dynamic pitch range and volume, but still driving and energized.

    Listen to David Attenborough. He has a quiet delivery, but it is still intense, full of wonder and exciting.

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    Entertainment in Wartime

    Script:

    Entertainment In Wartime
    It was farewell to all the worries and cares of the day. When the Paramount Theatre opened its doors, we forgot about names like Hitler and Mussolini. It was time instead to unwind and dream a little. The Paramount introduced new young singers like Frank Sinatra, and showed films with big stars like Clark Gable and Betty Hutton. These were the times that tried mens’ souls, but the glitz and glamour of Hollywood kept us distracted and entertained. We retained our perspective, and most importantly, allowed ourselves to hold on to a national sense of humor.

    19 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Scott Martin's recording

    Hello! Is this read too choppy or does it sound right to you? Trying new system to suppress the room noise. Did it work? Thanks for your comments and suggestions.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-8309/script-recording-28172.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Scott, I like your voice. It has a real nice tone to it.

    The performance was good, but the line with Hitler and Mussolini; at Mussolini you made it sound like a question. The pace could have been a little better because at some parts it seemed uneven.

    I also have problems at times with pitching and pacing, but I'm working on it to the best of my ability. As far as the sound quality, didn't hear any background noise.

    I can't say that this was choppy; I just think you need to revise it a tad bit. Also, heard some of your other work and really enjoyed it.

    Looking forward to your next read, best of luck, LCW.

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    Excerpts from Five Scripts

    Script:

    As we celebrate Chopin’s 200th Anniversary we follow a young pianist as he sets out to discover who put the song in to Chopin…

    So I’m going to go back to the job order that we created in the last lesson of the “Senior.Net Web Developer” by going to my navigation history and opening that specific job in our Max Hire record.

    This tool is called an oscillating spindle sander. It has so many uses it is definitely the most important tool in my shop. Her it is removing the saw blade marks and smoothing out the edges of the body.

    The Food Service team at Six Flags Magic Mountain get’s everyone in to the act and they quickly turn lunch time in to play time. The “Moose Muffle Shuffle” could be the new L.A. dance craze.

    Brainshark allows you to log in over the web, upload content such as PowerPoint’s, documents, photos, or existing video clips and using our patented technology add audio by phone, microphone, or MP3 upload and instantly transform your content in to voice enriched video presentations.

    24 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Glenn Cockrell's recording

    The following represents highlights or excerpts from five recorded scripts. This is a sampling of materials I am considering for my upcoming Demo Project. In addition to recording quality and performance I am soliciting feedback on the variety of the material in the presentation. No Music or sound effects at this time. I am also trying to tweak my new microphones and recording system to provide quality product.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/Cockrell Narrative Sample One.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    I'm quite impressed. The tone you took in the developer screencast was uncannily conversational. I edit out all my breath sounds because they bug me, but they don't seem to be a problem in your recording. I'm sorry but I can't find anything to criticize.

    Peer Feedback:

    I have no criticisms for the recording quality. It is excellent: There is plenty of room between the signal and the noise floor, no reflections could be easily picked up, and your voice is strong and clear.

    As for performance, your voice is strong, diction is clear, and the read seemed pretty natural overall.

    Just something to note, however: since this includes excerpts from five different scripts, a little extra space between the different reads would help the listener recognize when a transition from one excerpt to the next is taking place. Otherwise, the whole read would confuse someone who wasn't aware of the fact.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thank you both...I appreciate the feedback. I agree the spaces between the reads are narrow. I think if I wasn't worried about the 60 second time limit I would have stretched it out a bit more. But a good note for submitting multiple items.

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    Extinction 2012

    Script:

    The Maya, an ancient South American culture predicted that time would end in a violent apocalypse on December 21, 2012. they created and elaborate astronomical calendar called "The long Count" which stops abruptly in 2012. This date, which is also the winter equinox, coincides with and incredibly rare galactic alignment that happens once every 26,000 years,

    91 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear michellemittelstedt's recording

    New to V.O. Practicing tone and pace.

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-143892/script-recording-104800.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Michellem,

    May I be the first to say, that for being new to V.O. you clearly belong in this field! Not only does your voice flow smoothly - it seems as though with ease - you also have great articulation. One thing that I personally have to work on is being able to look at a script as a whole, meaning, what is the message of the script.. what pace and tone does it deserve, what is the emotion, the mood of it... all these things contributing to a great read. You read very well, but perhaps the mood of a 2012 extinction reveals "mystery", or "suspense". An upbeat tone may take a bit away from that mood. You have amazing potential Michelle, and I want to encourage you to continue on in voice over! I have much to learn, as I'm new to V.O. myself, but I truly appreciate being able to work together with you and this community to better our skills. Thanks, and keep up the Excellent work!

    Peer Feedback:

    too much inflection for this type of historical read. If I were the director, I would have you go again with a much flatter take.

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    Faces of Clay, Echoes of Africa

    Script:

    Video Documentary/Book: "Faces of Clay, Echoes of Africa"

    The remarkable story of the last Africans to be enslaved on the plantations of South Carolina.

    “Faces of Clay, Echoes of Africa” is a gripping account of the last slaves illegally smuggled into South Carolina. In 1858, long after the slave trade was abolished, a group of Southern planters secretly outfitted the pleasure yacht, Wanderer, transforming it from luxury cruiser into secret slaver, and sailed it from New York to the shores of West Africa.

    On the return journey, The Wanderer had more than than 400 Congolese Africans shackled in its belly. In the dark, cramped hull of the slave ship were boys and girls, Congo Kings, Princesses and their subjects--even entire tribes. The stories of these survivors had been lost to the pages of history until one jug bearing the face of their dark continent was found. More than 150 years later, like a key into a door of the past, this “face jug” unlocks the real story of the Wanderer and its survivors.

    39 people have played this

    Audition Recording:

    Click to hear Elton E. Jones's recording

    Hello, Michael. I was invited by Edge to send a demo for this project called "The Wanderer" Although it is pro bono, I thought it would give me a chance to get out of my comfort zone with a new challenge. The script calls for an African accent. I thought it came off pretty well (my hard-to-please wife was very impressed). I've already sent it to Anne in the Studio to forward to the client since it is due on 01/13/11. I look forward to your critique. BTW, if I am chosen, since this is pro bono work, what should I ask for in return? A letter of recommendation? anything else? Your advice would be greatly appreciated. Take care! Elton

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-3505/script-recording-26112.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Wow, Elton....nice! I like the read a lot. I'm not SURE about 'r' sound being done as spanish does...but I am definitely not experienced in african dialects. I guess I should pull up some video of Bishop Tutu or something along those lines? But dude, great work.

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks, Tom! This was different and fun to do. I listened to a couple of YouTube cuts to pick up the dialect. It sounded like there was a slight rolling "r" sound - not as heavy as the Spanish, but it seems to be there.

    E

    Peer Feedback:

    Very good Elton! I loved the accent as it fit the script perfectly. I can clearly visualize watching this and hearing your voice for the narration. Great job!

    Peer Feedback:

    Nice work Elton. You might also ask for a copy of the finished product for purposes of testimonial. Here's to your success.

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    22 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear JGARZA's recording

    ANY FEEDBACK WOULD BE APPRECIATED - PARTICULARLY SOUND QUALITY. THANKS AND GOD BLESS.,. JGARZA

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-1784/script-recording-29974.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    This has a nice warm quality. I did have some trouble understanding the heavy accent - perhaps it could be lightened a bit.

    Peer Feedback:

    This read really takes me back home:-) Nice voice and read, but I do agree with kdfishman, the accent is kinda strong and some words aren't very clear. I'm quite a newbie, but I do think the music should end about 30sec. sooner. Overall, your voice sounds very hospitable and friendly.:-) Best wishes JGARZA!

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    FATS WALLER

    Script:

    ats Waller
    Thomas “Fats” Waller began his jazz career early, learned fast, rose quickly, lived hard, and died young. A child prodigy, who was playing piano at age six, his life was a furious burst of energy –and it was all reflected in his music. Welcome to the world of Fats Waller: Joe Louis, Legs Diamond, George Gershwin –he knew them all; Harlem, Hollywood, Paris, London –he saw it all; Sex, fame, success, money –he had it all. His incredible gusto made him one of a kind. Fats was a giant, and he might just live, through his music, forever.

    27 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear dltittley1@gmail.com's recording

    Added some music on this. Do the vocals sound too low? How's the flow?

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-14418/script-recording-45259.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Where are you from? You have a distinct accent. You'll need to neutralize that.

    Peer Feedback:

    Hey man, I liked this a lot. Especially the way you said, "his incredible gusto." It just sounded so natural and real. The rest was good, but it somehow felt a little artificial. You have a very good voice, and the music you chose for this was perfect.

    Peer Feedback:

    I agree with Javier, the delivery was good and the music fit perfectly. Well done!

    Lenny

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks for the feedback! Really appreciate it. TXTom..I am from NYC ..working on the neutralizing part...any tips on how to accomplish that?

    Peer Feedback:

    I have to suppress the Tx part of my reads. But my natural delivery is only slightly SoMo. Edge has a dialect coach who is supposed to be quite good. I guess a good way to work on it without going to a coach might be to listen to some really good reads from VO's who don't deliver a regionalism and then record the same thing and compare. Seems reasonable for at least practicing. Believe me....keeping it out sometimes is hard.

    Peer Feedback:

    I liked this one alot.....good job!

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    Film Institute Documentary

    Script:

    Film, even from its silent days in the 1920s, has proven to be an art form particularly suitable for handling intimate psychological subjects. It is a medium of observation, the almost clinical recording of human behavior, with every nuance of expression and gesture enhanced in the close-up. As a highly controlled flow of images, film is uniquely able to reflect the flux of mental and emotional experience. Madness, which raises basic questions about the nature of these experiences, has been a very popular subject for filmmakers. For the film artist, madness is a subject that probes the darkest and most hidden side of our being.

    26 people have played this

    Practice Recording:

    Click to hear Kate's recording

    This is my first upload to the Edge website and frankly one of my first recordings. Yes I am a neewbie so all feedback very welcome. Thanks

    /sites/default/files/script-recordings/user-7330/script-recording-30490.mp3

    Peer Feedback:

    Welcome here Kate, I am new as well. I have difficulty commenting on the read as my English heritage but American ear listens with to someone speak in the mother tounge. My comment is thus focussed on the breath and mouth sounds. I'd encourage you to listen carefully with headphones on for the sounds between the words and work to eliminate those. An issue I deal with as well.

    Peer Feedback:

    Welcome to Edge Kate.....you are off to a good start. A few things to think about...first I'm loving the "mother tongue" it is charming. But you need to sound less mechanical and more conversational. You are reading words- but need to be expressing thoughts. So, break your sentences into phrases and speak them as you would to someone sitting next to you. I didn't have my headset handy, but picked up on several breaths. The short, less obvious ones are ok...but you might try to edit out the more noticeable ones. Other than that....very nice quality and pace.....send more please....thanks for sharing!

    Peer Feedback:

    Thanks so much for the helpul feedback. Keeping it convesational is key, I totally agree. Plus breaths are very distracting so will figure out how to edit those out. Kate

    Peer Feedback:

    You got into it near the end. Maybe you were feeling it. Your voice opened up.
    I suggest you back away from the microphone a little, and off to the side to avoid picking up the breaths and mouth noises. Then use your full voice. Experiment!

    Peer Feedback:

    Kate - your voice took me home to England - lovely and clear! Couple of suggestions - you sounded a bit too careful in your reading - just relax a bit and imagine you're talking to a few people as you record, rather than reading the script. I did hear a kind of rushing sound in the background, not sure what that was, perhaps the technical folks can let you know what that could be. Keep working on the mouth noises and breaths - the bane of my existence too! - otherwise great first recording!

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