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The Voice Over Practice Script Library

Script Genres > English Adult > Narration > Biography

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A Tribute the Armed Forces

A Tribute to the Armed Forces
This is a tribute to the heroism, loyalty and valor of our armed forces… and their families,

author unknown.

The night before the burial of her husband, 2nd Lt. James Cathey, United States Marine Corps, who’d been killed in Iraq, Katherine Cathey refused to leave the casket, instead, asking to sleep next to his body one final time. The Marines made a bed for her, tucking in the sheets below the flag. Before she fell asleep, she opened her laptop computer and played songs that reminded her of "Cat"… one of the Marines asked if she wanted them to continue standing watch as she slept, or to retire to just outside the door…
"I think it would be kind of nice if you kept doing it" she said.
"I think that's what he would have wanted".

I’m Not sure what is more honorable: Being married to this faithful wife to the end or the Marine attentively standing next to the casket… watching over them both.

Always remember, Freedom is not free. It’s paid for in blood
IN HONOR OF OF OUR ARMED FORCES

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A Tribute to the Armed Forces

This is a tribute to the heroism, loyalty and valor of our armed forces… and their families,

author unknown.

The night before the burial of her husband, 2nd Lt. James Cathey, United States Marine Corps, who’d been killed in Iraq, Katherine Cathey refused to leave the casket, instead, asking to sleep next to his body one final time. The Marines made a bed for her, tucking in the sheets below the flag. Before she fell asleep, she opened her laptop computer and played songs that reminded her of "Cat"… one of the Marines asked if she wanted them to continue standing watch as she slept, or to retire to just outside the door…
"I think it would be kind of nice if you kept doing it" she said.
"I think that's what he would have wanted".

I’m Not sure what is more honorable: Being married to this faithful wife to the end or the Marine attentively standing next to the casket… watching over them both.

Always remember, Freedom is not free. It’s paid for in blood
IN HONOR OF OF OUR ARMED FORCES

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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln rose from his chair and advanced toward the podium. He was now at the height of his power, with the Civil War nearly won. In one hand he held a single sheet of paper, typeset and printed in double columns. The foreboding clouds threatened another downpour. Then, reported Noah Brooks, journalist and friend of the president, the strangest thing happened: “Just at that moment the sun, which had been obscured all day, burst forth in its unclouded meridian splendor and flooded the spectacle with glory and light. Every heart beat quicker at the unexpected omen…so might the darkness which had obscured the past four years be now dissipated.” The president’s text was brief – just 701 words.

“Fondly do we hope – fervently do we pray – that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away… With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan – to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations.”

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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was a genius, and one of the greatest physicists of all time. His famous Theories of Relativity, which describe the relationship between mass and energy, and between space and time, were published in 1905 and 1916. Einstein was born of Jewish parents in Ulm, Germany. He spent many years in Switzerland, becoming a Swiss citizen in 1901, and gaining his Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1905 from Zurich University. It was while employed as a patent clerk in Berne that he published his first Theory of Relativity. This contained his famous equation: E=mc2, which explains the relationship between mass and energy.

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Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart dared to go where no one had gone before. The public adored the pioneering pilot. And news reels of the day captured her every move. Yet the private side of Amelia would always remain an enigma.

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Amelia Earhart 2

On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart and Fred Newman disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean, during their attempted around the world flight. The U.S. Government’s official conclusion was that the fliers were unable to locate their destination of Howland Island, ran out of fuel, crash landed into the water, and sank to the bottom of the deep ocean. Seventeen thousand feet below the surface. But the government’s conclusion did not satisfy some researchers and enthusiasts. Since there was no physical evidence to support it, alternate theories began to emerge.

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Amelia Earhart 3

Some say things can’t be done. Others do them, proving that with the right combination of bravado and talent, there’s no telling what you can accomplish. Nicknamed “Lady Lindy”, Amelia Earhart was not only the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, she held women’s speed and distance records that earned her place as the first woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross. As a nurse during World War I, Earhart developed an early concern for her fellow man that helped her champion human rights around the world. Her memorable accomplishments in the air moved her to pen three best-selling books.

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Amelia Earhart 4

A warm summer's day. A young woman's life is radically changed in a matter of hours. 20 hours and 40 minutes to be exact. The time it took Amelia Mary Earhart to become the first woman to fly across the Atlantic . . . as a passenger on a flight toward destiny. On June 18, 1928, Amelia Earhart went from living a rather ordinary life as a social worker to becoming a demi-goddess unable to go anywhere in the world without being worshipped as though an angel from the heavens.

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Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams, more than any other individual, brought Yosemite and the national park idea to the American people. His photographs, his letters, his lobbying of Congress, presidents and the National Park Service, spanned seven decades. They served, and still serve, to make millions aware of Yosemite’s beauty and to call attention to the dangers it faces. A craggy-faced man with a sharp nose bent slightly to the left, Ansel Adams was gracious, warm, and welcoming. He made close friends and kept them; he welcomed new friends into his life. He was focused, energetic, and filled with good humor – a master of the pun. He cared about people, he cared about his friends, and he cared passionately about Yosemite.

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Ansel Adams "The Silver Light "

Ansel Adams - "The Silver Light"
I was climbing the long ridge west of Mount Clark. It was one of those mornings where the sunlight is burnished with a keen wind and long feathers of cloud move in a lofty sky. The silver light turned every blade of grass and every particle of sand into a luminous metallic splendor; there was nothing, however small, that did not clash in the bright wind, that did not send arrows of light through the glassy air. I was suddenly arrested in the long crunching path up the ridge by an exceedingly pointed awareness of the light. The moment I paused, the full impact of the mood was upon me; I saw more clearly than I have ever seen before or since the minute detail of the grasses ...the small flotsam of the forest, the motion of the high clouds streaming above the peaks... I dreamed that for a moment time stood quietly, and the vision became but the shadow of an infinitely greater world -- and I had within the grasp of consciousness a transcendental experience.

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Ansel Adams "The Silver Light"

I was climbing the long ridge west of Mount Clark, It was one of those
mornings where the sunlight is burnished with a keen wind and long feathers of cloud move in a lofty sky.

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Ansel Adams - "The Silver Light"

I was climbing the long ridge west of Mount Clark. It was one of those mornings where the sunlight is burnished with a keen wind and long feathers of cloud move in a lofty sky. The silver light turned every blade of grass and every particle of sand into a luminous metallic splendor; there was nothing, however small, that did not clash in the bright wind, that did not send arrows of light through the glassy air. I was suddenly arrested in the long crunching path up the ridge by an exceedingly pointed awareness of the light. The moment I paused, the full impact of the mood was upon me; I saw more clearly than I have ever seen before or since the minute detail of the grasses ...the small flotsam of the forest, the motion of the high clouds streaming above the peaks... I dreamed that for a moment time stood quietly, and the vision became but the shadow of an infinitely greater world -- and I had within the grasp of consciousness a transcendental experience.

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Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth’s presence still looms over Yankee Stadium ... he set countless marks that still stand unchallenged. The crowds loved him, and for 22 years, he gave them more than their money’s worth. He hit the most home runs with a life total of 714. He received the most bases on balls of any man in baseball, 2,056. And he struck out the most times, too, 1,330. His total of 60 home runs in one season, made in 1927, stood for 34 years until in 1961, Roger Maris of the New York Yankees pooled 61 homers, but in a longer playing season. The Babe’s lifetime batting average of .342 is among the highest seven in baseball history.

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Bad Bad Ed O'Hare

The speckles in the Pacific night sky were bombers. Nine twin-engine Japanese bombers, in formation, on course to their target: the aircraft carrier Lexington.

Butch O’Hare could see them all clearly from the cockpit of his Grumman Wildcat F4F. He was their lone-wolf pursuer, tagging along in the darkness. If he did not seize the opportunity now to attack from the rear, his home base, the carrier Lexington, would be obliterated-sent to the ocean floor in fragments of twisted steel.

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Baldoon Castle’s Ghost

Baldoon Castle’s ghost became the subject of a novel by Sir Walter Scott—“The Bride of Lammermuir.” Forced by her parents to abandon the man she loved, the bride married David Dunbar but went insane and stabbed him on her wedding night. Ever since that terrible night in the 17th century, the bride is reputed to roam the castle dressed in white, blood-spattered garments, most often sighted on the anniversary of her death.

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Barbara Stresiand

The memorable motion picture "The Way We Were" brought her a 1973 Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. The very successful "A Star Is Born," released in 1976, was the first movie to benefit from her energy and insight as a producer and won six Golden Globes. The soundtrack album topped the charts and has been certified quadruple-platinum.

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Barbara Walters

Barbara was born 73 years ago to a nightclub owner and article producer Lou Walters and his wife Dena. The couple had already lost a son and had an older daughter who was mildly retarded. The family bounced back and forth from Boston to Miami to New York, where they lived in penthouses until her father lost his fortune in the mid 1950's. Barbara, who'd just graduated from Sarah Lawrence College, helped support her parents with her income from a secretarial job. By 1964 she'd become a "Today girl" - her job was essentially to make the male anchor look good, and to look good herself. Eventually, she became the cohost. A couple of dozen pre-Oscar interviews later, Walters signed on as cohost of 20/20. In 1997 she also became co-executive producer of the View- a responsibility she'll keep when, after 25 years, she gives up her weekly 20/20 gig.

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Beach Boys

The American rock group, The Beach Boys, are known for their rich vocal harmonies and for songs about cars, love, and surfing in the California sun. The band was formed in 1961 by three brothers from Hawthorne, California - Brian, Carl, and Dennis Wilson, their cousin Mike Love, and a friend Al Jardine. The Beach Boys moved quickly from local to national fame with a run of hit songs during the mid-1960’s, including “Surfin’ U.S.A.” (1963), “Fun, Fun, Fun,” (1964), “I get Around” (1964), “Help me, Rhonda” (1965), and “California Girls” (1965). Based largely on an ideal of California adolescence, the group’s records helped define a style known

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Beethoven

Of all the hundreds of symphonies that have been composed, none can rival in popularity or emotional interest the nine great symphonic works that Beethoven wrote. Beethoven took music off the pedestal of formal beauty, where Haydn and Mozart had left it, and immersed it in the whirlpool of life. He roughened it up until it began to do what he expected it to do ... to express problems, evoke emotions, move and struggle exuberantly. More people can respond at once to a Beethoven symphony than to any other. Many have written fine symphonies, but Beethoven’s remain in a class by themselves, as invaluable a part of our heritage as are Shakespeare’s plays.

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Beethoven

Beethoven
Of all the hundreds of symphonies that have been composed, none can rival in popularity or emotional interest the nine great symphonic works that Beethoven wrote. Beethoven took music off the pedestal of formal beauty, where Haydn and Mozart had left it, and immersed it in the whirlpool of life. He roughened it up until it began to do what he expected it to do ... to express problems, evoke emotions, move and struggle exuberantly. More people can respond at once to a Beethoven symphony than to any other. Many have written fine symphonies, but Beethoven’s remain in a class by themselves, as invaluable a part of our heritage as are Shakespeare’s plays.

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Ben Franklin

Ben Franklin preached the joy of work and practiced what he preached. As a young man, he sometimes worked all night to finish a promised job on time. When he bought paper for his printing shop, he was not too proud to trundle it home himself in a wheelbarrow. On his first journey to Philadelphia, though he had paid his passage, he volunteered to help row the boat down the Delaware, and proved himself to be so useful, that the boatmen didn’t want to take his money. “Diligence is the mother of good luck,” he wrote, “and God gives all things to industry.”

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Bert Wheeler And Robert Woolsey

Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey were loved by literally millions of movie fans around the entire world in the 1930's. They did 21 feature films together and saved RKO Studios from bankruptcy. They were also RKO's biggest moneymakers when the RKO stable included Cary Grant, Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers, Kathryn Hepburn, Barbara Stanwyck, and a host of other greats.

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Betty Crocker

Betty Crocker is an imaginary person. Nonetheless, in a 1945 survey she was named the second-best-known woman in America, after Eleanor Roosevelt. She was “born” in 1921 during a Gold Medal flour promotion in which users completed a puzzle to win a pin cushion. Company executives decided to use the signature of “Betty Crocker” on the prize letters--Betty because the name had a warm approachable feel, and Crocker after an early company director, William G, Crocker. The fictional Ms. Crocker became so popular that she soon had her own products and recipe books, many of which still exist today.

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Betty Crocker

Betty Crocker is an imaginary person. Nonetheless, in a 1945 survey she was named the second-best-known woman in America, after Eleanor Roosevelt. She was “born” in 1921 during a Gold Medal flour promotion in which users completed a puzzle to win a pin cushion. Company executives decided to use the signature of “Betty Crocker” on the prize letters--Betty because the name had a warm approachable feel, and Crocker after an early company director, William G, Crocker. The fictional Ms. Crocker became so popular that she soon had her own products and recipe books, many of which still exist today.

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Beyonce Knowles

A Houston native, Beyoncé Knowles is a founding member and chief songwriter of Destiny's Child, one of the biggest selling female acts of all time. With many of the group's hit songs co-written and co-produced by Beyoncé, Destiny's Child has sold more than 33 million records worldwide. When Beyoncé won the 2001 ASCAP Pop Songwriter Of The Year Award, she became the first African-American woman -- and the second woman ever -- to receive that honor.

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Bill

He was six feet two inches in height, at least that what he claimed. But he actually appeared to be a full inch taller. Dark hair, blue eyes and usually a somewhat stern face. Due to his normal countenance, some people thought he was probably a hard man. He seldom smiled, but when he did, it was such a wide smile that even the most skeptical could be put at ease. He had large hands, rough and calloused from his years of farming with a team of mules. A light shirt and bib overalls were his normal attire, and if he were going to town, a brown Stetson would certainly be his head covering. A very unassuming man, so when someone happened to call him sir, he would quickly reply, “You can just call me Bill.”

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Bill Cosby Biography

With numerous awards to his credit, Bill Cosby is one of the top names in comedy. As an actor, comedian, writer, and producer, he helped break down racial barriers on television in the 1960s with “I Spy” and later with “The Cosby Show”. Cosby grew up in Philadelphia's Germantown neighborhood as the oldest of four boys and attended Temple University. While at Temple, Cosby landed a job as a bartender at a coffee house. He told jokes there, and eventually started filling in for the house comedian from time to time at a nearby club. Soon, Cosby started performing in New York City and, in 1963, he made an appearance on The Tonight Show, which helped introduce him to a national audience.

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Bill Gates

Born in Seattle, Washington, on October 28, 1955, William Henry Gates III is the only son of the three children of Mary and William Henry Gates, Jr. A bright and active child, Bill began cutting classes to hang out at all hours at his private school’s computer center. When he was only 16, he and friend Paul Allen sold their computer-run system to monitor highway traffic and reportedly earned $20,000 -- but business fell off when customers found out that the entrepreneurs were still in high school.

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Biography: Hemingway, By Kenneth S. Lynn, Page 592

Around seven o’clock on Sunday morning, Hemingway arose from his bed, went to the kitchen, got the key, opened the storeroom, selected a twelve-gauge, double-barreled English shotgun he had bought at Abercrombie & Fitch, pushed two shells into it, walked upstairs to the foyer, turned the gun against himself and fired. The explosion blew away his entire cranial vault. Whether he had placed the gun barrels in his mouth or pressed them to his forehead is impossible to say.

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Bix Beiderbecke

Bix Beiderbecke - one of the great jazz musicians of the 1920's. Mainly self-taught, he was influenced by recordings of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and by the music of King Oliver and Louis Armstrong. A sensitive, lonely man driven by artistic ambition, his troubled life and beautiful tone on the cornet made him a legend in the history of jazz.

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Boris Yeltsin

For Yeltsin, it must seem a long time since the glory days of 1991, when the anti-Communist rebel easily won his country’s first democratic election. That August, he also became the brave hero who, as tanks encircled the parliament, stood atop one of them and exhorted thousands of civilians to resist the attempted military coup against Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev. If successful, the coup would also have ended Yeltsin’s career--and possibly his life--but he kept his power and became even more popular.

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Carl Sandburg

“What Sandburg knew and said was what America knew from the beginning and said from the beginning and has not yet, no matter what is believed of her, forgotten how to say”, notes Archibald MacLeish in his introduction to the collected poems of Carl Sandburg. Carl Sanburg, the son of Swedish immigrant parents, was born in Galesburg, Illinois, on January 6, 1878. Until he was thirty-six he was virtually unknown to the literary world, but in 1914 a group of his poems appeared in Poetry magazine, and the following year, with the publication of Chicago Poems, he embarked on a literary career that brought him international fame as a poet, novelist, biographer, historian, journalist, and musician.

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Cary Grant

Cary Grant’s classy film persona and peerless timing are so ingrained in our collective psyche that we tend to confuse the man with the myth. So good was he at playing the icon known as Cary Grant that it was often said he always played the same part--himself. The truth is that he was an underrated actor who brought depth and dimension to his characters, and he never played himself. Of all the roles he created, Cary Grant was his greatest invention.

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Cary Grant 2

Cary Grant was one of the most debonair figures in American film history. Only Fred Astaire could compare. Everything about Grant’s screen persona suggested wealth and good breeding: his exquisite clothes; his perpetually suntanned face; his distinctive, indeterminate accent; his easy, confident stride; his impeccable manners; his somewhat aloof demeanor. Those qualities held true offscreen as well, but his real life was far less perfect and far more complex than his image. Though he was the personification of the romantic leading man, Grant had checkered, sometimes turbulent relationships with women.

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Charles Lindbergh

Just after 10 p.m. on May 21, 1927, a small silver-nosed airplane circled the Eiffel Tower, then headed northeast over Paris. In the cockpit, the weary young pilot swept his flashlight over the instrument panel to check that the readings were normal. Then he fastened his seat belt and descended toward Le Bourget Aerodrome, where, unbeknownst to him, 100,000 people awaited his arrival. As the plane rolled to a stop, a roar went up from the crowd: “Lindbergh! Lindbergh! Vive Lindbergh!” Charles Lindbergh, an obscure 25-year-old airmail pilot from Minnesota, had just become the first person to fly nonstop 3,600 miles across the Atlantic Ocean--solo, no less.

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Charlie Chaplin

Charlie Chaplin is the comic artist of our time. He pioneered the development of film comedy from anarchy to art in just a few short years, and created a screen character whose worldwide impact has never been equaled. Unlike most of his colleagues in the film world, he knew he special. He received international acclaim within months of his film debut, and after just one year, won not only an enormous salary, but complete control of his work. He was an artist who worked at his own pace and in his own style at at time when few other filmmakers enjoyed those luxuries. What set Charlie Chaplin apart from the rest?

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Christopher Plummer

Throughout his career, the consummate Actor Christopher Plummer has been a reluctant film star, eschewing the blockbuster movie for roles in such films as 1978’s International Velvet and 1994’s thriller Delores Claiborne.

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Christopher Reeve

The whole world held its breath when Christopher Reeve struggled for life on Memorial Day, 1995. On the third jump of a riding competition, Reeve was thrown headfirst from his horse in an accident that broke his neck and left him unable to move or breathe. In the years following the accident, Reeve raised much awareness and money for spinal cord research. And in 1998, he penned the heartbreaking, funny and courageous autobiography, "Still Me". As we look back, you'll hear from the Man of Steel himself through interview footage as he talks about his early success on Broadway opposite the legendary Katherine Hepburn, and later the adventure of filming Superman on the streets of New York, and how the movie made him a star. With dignity and sensitivity, he describes the journey he has made - physically, emotionally, spiritually. This is the determined, passionate story of one man, a gifted actor and star.

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Claude Debussy

The notes you are hearing...changed the way we listen to music...not only classical...but contemporary as well. Claude Debussy, he heard things differently. He wasn't very fond of rules and had no respect for the musical status quo. His influences still linger in the jazz music of today.

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Coldplay -- Behind The Music

The band Coldplay, formed in January of 1998. Their self-financed demo sessions produced the release of their first EP that May. One of the tracks called "Bigger Stronger', earned the band excellent notices in the UK press. However, they didn’t get signed by a major label until late 1999. [After some touring with new band members and breakthrough hits like "Yellow" and "Shiver," they released their chart-topping debut album, Parachutes, in July of 2000.

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Countess Elizabeth Bathory

Could there have been a female vampire? Hungarian Countess Elizabeth Bathory, known as the Blood Countess, was accused of killing a number of young girls and bathing in their blood. She was convicted and confined to her castle until her death in 1614.

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Courtney Love

Courtney Love. The girl with the most cake. The girl with the loudest mouth and the fiercest guitar. The girl of many talents – not least among them the power to shock. Not since Madonna declared that she was like a virgin has someone in the public spotlight so consistently challenged the notion of what it means to be female – and what it means to be well behaved.

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Dalai Lama

He is known in his homeland by many poetic titles--the Ocean of Wisdom, Holder of the White Lotus, and Protector of the Land of Snows. Millions of followers around the globe worship him as Tibet’s Living Buddha and its Wish-Fulfilling Gem, the reincarnation of Bodhisattva Chenrezig, the Lord of Compassion. Here in the West, we know him as Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama, spiritual and political leader of 6 million Tibetans. As the exiled head of the Vajrayana branch of the Buddhist religion, he toiled in near obscurity for almost three decades before winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. A charismatic man, as quick to laugh and joke as he is to hold forth on a serious political issue, the Dalai Lama has since become the most unlikely of celebrities.

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Daniel Moynihan

Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who is retiring from the United States Senate after twenty-four years in office, spent his afternoons during the winters of 1942 shining shoes in front of the Wurlitzer Building, on Forty-second Street between Sixth Avenue and Broadway. He was fourteen years old and lived in a small Upper West Side apartment with his mother. He would set up his kit after school each day, and work through the rush hour. A shine cost a nickel; the goal was to bring home a dollar.

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David Hockney

David Hockney was born on July 9, 1937 in the industrial town of Bradford, in Yorkshire, England, to a working-class but politically radical family. Although his father, Kenneth, ran an accounting business, he was also an antiwar activist who wrote letters of protest to world leaders. David was the fourth of five children. His mother, Laura, was a shop assistant and a strict vegetarian.

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Edward Abbey

Edward Abbey

When Edward Abbey died in 1989 at the age of sixty-two, the American West lost one of its most eloquent and passionate advocates.

Through his novels, essays, letters, and speeches, Edward Abbey consistently voiced the belief that the West was in danger of being developed to death, and that the only solution lay in the preservation of wilderness.

Abbey authored twenty-one books in his lifetime, including Desert Solitaire, The Monkey Wrench Gang, The Brave Cowboy, and The Fool's Progress.

His comic novel The Monkey Wrench Gang helped inspire a whole generation of environmental activism.

A writer in the mold of Twain and Thoreau, Abbey was a larger-than-life figure as big as the West itself.

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Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt brought a breezy informality and bustle of activity to the White House. At the inaugural buffet, the President waited his turn to be served like anyone else, and Mrs. Roosevelt helped with the serving. She also horrified chief usher “Ike” Hoover by insisting immediately on operating the elevator herself. “That just isn’t done, Mrs. Roosevelt,” he protested. “It is now,” she said, slipping in alone and closing the door. During Mrs. Roosevelt’s first day at the White House, a woman reporter telephoned and asked for Mrs. Roosevelt’s secretary Malvina Thompson. “Miss Thompson isn’t in,” a voice replied. “May I help?” “Who is this?” asked the reporter. “Mrs. Roosevelt,” was the reply.

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Ellen (Nellie) Cashman

With thousands of other desperate Irish Catholic immigrants, Nellie Cashman came to Boston with her mother and sister about 1860. They then moved west, making their home in San Francisco in 1869. It was there that Nellie and her mother contracted mining fever and they soon left for the silver camps of Nevada, stopping in Virginia City, the Comstock, and Pioche. In 1872 the Cashmans opened the Miner’s Boarding House in Pioche, a venture that marked the beginning of Nellie’s lifelong pattern of operating a small business to support her mining ventures. After only a year in Pioche, Nellie, with an otherwise all-male party of 200 Nevada prospectors, headed for the remote Cassiar gold-mining district of northern British Columbia. There, she later told reporters, she “alternately mined and kept a boarding house for miners,” which she ran through the summer of 1873. In the fall she relocated in Victoria, where she intended to winter in the milder climate of the coast.

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Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson loved words ardently. Her feeling about them amounted to veneration and her selection of them was ritualistic. In one poem she states “A Word that breathes distinctly has not the power to die.” As artist, she conceived of brevity, not as a way to sketch in miniature, but as a means of achieving the single moment of intensity. Dickinson knew she could not pierce through to the unknowable, but she insisted on asking the questions.

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Ernest Hemingway

For over twenty years, Ernest Hemingway spent virtually every fall and winter at Sun Valley, Idaho. Although his legendary haunts were Italy, France, Switzerland, Spain and Cuba, Idaho was his true home. The wild mountain crags, the sunny meadows were his nirvana. The hunting and fishing were always good there. The canoe trip down the Silver Creek or a trek up a pass of the Pahsimeroi (Paw-sim-er-roy) Range unfailingly yielded fresh game for the table. Papa and his fiction thrived on the alternating sessions of high adventure and novel writing.

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Ernest Hemingway 2

Across more than half a century, the life and work of Ernest Hemingway have been at the center of a critical controversy. For that, Hemingway himself was largely responsible. From the moment he embarked upon his career as a writer, he presented himself to the world as a man’s man, and in both his published work and his very public behavior he established a heroic image of himself as an athlete and sportsman, a worldly-wise reporter, a battle-scarred soldier, an aficionado of the Spanish bullfight, and a hard-drinking bon vivant.

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Fats Waller

Thomas “Fats” Waller began his jazz career early, learned fast, rose quickly, lived hard, and died young. A child prodigy, who was playing piano at age six, his life was a furious burst of energy –and it was all reflected in his music. Welcome to the world of Fats Waller: Joe Louis, Legs Diamond, George Gershwin –he knew them all; Harlem, Hollywood, Paris, London –he saw it all; Sex, fame, success, money –he had it all. His incredible gusto made him one of a kind. Fats was a giant, and he might just live, through his music, forever.

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Florence Nightingale

If you think of Florence Nightingale as a beatific, selfless nurse who spent her life gently tending to the sick and wounded--think again. The real Florence Nightingale spent only three of her 90 years as a nurse. After that, she was a semi-invalid who clung to Victorian mores, actively lobbying against treating nursing as a profession and dismissing women who fought for equality. And the woman considered the founder of modern nursing adamantly refused to recognize the discoveries of modern science. Nevertheless, Nightingale--nicknamed “the lady with a lamp”--managed to make sweeping improvements in health care, setting new standards for sanitation and cleanliness in the treatment of disease and becoming an inspiration for millions.

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Frank Lloyd Wright, By Spencer Hart

American architect Frank Lloyd Wright has been called the greatest single influence on twentieth-century design. His 70-year career spanned an era of enormous change in the nation and the world, and he was in the vanguard of those who sought to make architecture relevant to the social and cultural dynamic of their time. After his marriage to Catherine Tobin in his early 20's, and the rapid growth of their family to six children, Wright used his own Oak Park home as a template for his burgeoning ideas on an architecture in which form not only followed function, but became one with it.

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Gandhi

Reared in a deeply religious home, Gandhi received an indifferent formal education in India, and in 1888 began law studies in England. In quest of clerical work, he went to South Africa in 1893, and was shocked at the racial discrimination there. He became an advocate for his fellow Indians in South Africa, and undertook a series of challenges to the government that led to jail. After thorough soul-searching, he entered politics in India in 1919, to protest British sedition laws. He emerged as the head of the Indian National Congress, and advocated a policy of non-violent, non-cooperation to achieve Indian independence.

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George Eastman

George Eastman set to work on simplifying the apparatus of photography and came up with the famous Kodak camera. The Eastman story was the stuff of legend. He was the poor widow’s son who started off as a $3 a week clerk, and by dint of hard work and phenomenal determination rose to vast fame and wealth. But he was a decidedly different kind of industrial giant. He had to overcome fierce competition and embarrassing failures as he struggled to make photography easy and affordable for everyone. In the process, he forever changed the way people see their world.

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George Gershwin

It’s very clear. His songs are here to stay. He is one of the Country’s most beloved and prolific composers, and artist whose seemingly facile way with a tune call up images of starry Manhattan skylines, a top hat and tails, the perfect martini. Whether collaborating with brother Ira which he did much of the time until his death at thirty-nine-or other legends, George Gershwin was the consummate crossover artist, a songwriter whose sophisticated and accessible amalgams of jazz, swing, pop, and classical music still percolate in our collective unconscious.

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Georgia O'Keeffe

Georgia O'Keeffe revolutionized modern art, both in her time and in the present. And if we understand O'Keeffe's emotional response to nature and her need to create an equivalent in art, we hold the key to her work. In the 1920s she explored this theme in her magnified paintings of flowers, meant to convey that Nature, in all its beauty, was as powerful as the widespread industrialization of the period. After spending her first summer in New Mexico, she began to paint the colorful yet barren landscape, expansive skies and bleached bones that would capture her imagination, and her heart, for the rest of her life.

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Georgia O’keefe

Georgia O’Keefe’s rather ordinary childhood on a dairy farm in southern Wisconsin suggested little of the extraordinary life the future American painter would lead. Born November 15, 1887 in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin – a town of 900 near Madison -- O’Keefe and her 6 siblings helped with chores on the large, prosperous farm every day after school. Their mother read to the children until they could read themselves……

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Gertrude Bell

Turning away from the privileged world of the “eminent Victorians,” Gertrude Bell explored, mapped, and excavated the world of the Arabs. Recruited by British intelligence during World War I, she played a crucial role in obtaining the loyalty of Arab leaders. After the war, she played a major role in creating the modern Middle East and was, at the time, considered the most powerful woman in the British Empire. In this masterful biography, Janet Wallach shows us the woman behind these achievements – a woman whose passion and defiant independence were at odds with the confined and custom-bound England she left behind. Gertrude Bell emerges at last in her own right as a vital player on the stage of modern history, and as a woman whose life was both a heartbreaking story and a grand adventure.

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Gertrude Bell

Gertrude Bell
Turning away from the privileged world of the “eminent Victorians,” Gertrude Bell explored, mapped, and excavated the world of the Arabs. Recruited by British intelligence during World War I, she played a crucial role in obtaining the loyalty of Arab leaders. After the war, she played a major role in creating the modern Middle East and was, at the time, considered the most powerful woman in the British Empire. In this masterful biography, Janet Wallach shows us the woman behind these achievements – a woman whose passion and defiant independence were at odds with the confined and custom-bound England she left behind. Gertrude Bell emerges at last in her own right as a vital player on the stage of modern history, and as a woman whose life was both a heartbreaking story and a grand adventure.

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Gustave Flaubert

Gustave Flaubert lived most of his life in his country estate of Croisset, near Rouen, in Normandy. He followed a strict regimen of work over many years and produced, slowly and painfully, eight novels of which two or three are masterpieces (Madame Bovary, L’Education Sentimentale), and a volume of three stories (Trois Contes). Flaubert looked upon himself as a romantic. He manifested the romantic’s scorn for the morality and the customs of the bourgeoisie. From the second generation of romantic writers, from Gautier and the Art for Art’s Sake movement, he inherited the scrupulous care for the technique, for the perfection of the written sentence.

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Harry Houdini

Houdini was the son of a rabbi who emigrated from Hungary to the United States and settled in Appleton, Wisconsin. He became a trapeze performer in circuses at an early age, and after settling in New York City in 1882, he performed in vaudeville shows there without much success. From about 1900, Houdini began to earn an international reputation for his daring feats of extrication from shackles, ropes and handcuffs, and from various locked containers ranging from milk cans to coffins to prison cells. In a typical act he was shackled with chains and placed in a box that was locked, roped, and weighted.

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Helen Keller

Helen Keller had an ageless quality about her ... inherent even in her looks ... in keeping with her amazing life story. Blind, deaf, and mute from early childhood, she rose above her triple handicap to become one of the best known characters in the modern world, and an inspiration to both the blind and seeing everywhere. When she visited Japan after World War II, boys and girls in remote villages ran to greet her, crying “Helen Keller, Helen Keller!” Her name had penetrated jungles even before the days of radio or motion pictures. Although warmed by this human reaction, she had no wish to be set aside from the rest of mankind.

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Hilary Swank

It’s no trick to see why Hilary Swank, having won the Oscar for her fearless, inspired, gender-melting performance in Boys Don’t Cry, should choose The Affair of the Necklace as her follow-up vehicle. Set amid the decadent French monarchy on the eve of the Revolution, the film allows Swank to cast her image back to an era when men and women occupied roles as corseted as their clothing; its her not-so-subtle attempt to reassert her femininity in a “prestige” chick flick.

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HIlary Swank

It’s no trick to see why Hilary Swank, having won the Oscar for her fearless, inspired, gendermelting performance in Boys Don’t Cry, should choose The Affair of the Necklace
as her follow-up vehicle.

Set amid the decadent French monarchy on the eve of the Revolution, the film allows
Swank to cast her image back to an era when men and women occupied roles as corseted as their clothing; it's her not-so-subtle attempt to reassert her femininity in a “prestige” chick flick.

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Hillary Clinton

Though the self-described “nice Republican girl” had campaigned for Barry Goldwater, Hillary began to develop a more liberal outlook at Wellesley College, where she was Student Body President of the class of 1969. She went on to Yale Law School, at the time a hotbed of student protest, but she felt the best path to social change was working within the system. She planned to focus on improving public education and protecting the rights of women and children, especially those in poverty.

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History of LSD

In 1938, a Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann synthesized LSD for the first time while studying ergots, a type of fungus. Though the pharmaceutical company that he worked for, Sandoz, didn't have any interest in the compound, Hofmann found himself inexplicably drawn to it. Five years later, in the spring of 1943, he synthesized it again, noticing that it seemed to have unusual properties: After accidentally absorbing small amounts through his fingertips one day in the lab, Hofmann had to leave work early, under the effects of what he called "a not unpleasant intoxicated-like condition." A few days later, he experimented with taking what he thought was a small dose of LSD, about 250 micrograms (a common dose now is more on the order of 100 micrograms), and proceeded to trip out of his mind, an experience he describes in his book LSD: My Problem Child.

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Hogarth’s World

William Hogarth who lived from :1697 – 1764, was an artist and engraver. He specialized in satire, which would be referred to these days as, heavy handed moralizing on the wages of sin. His plates were so popular that they were actually pirated. Leading Parliament to pass the Hogarth Act of 1735, to protect copyright. The plates provide us with an invaluable look at life in Georgian London. His eight plate series ,The Harlot's Progress, traces the life of a country lass from her arrival in London to an imprisoned whore. In The Rake's Progress, the debauched protagonist is seen at one stage being entertained in a Russell Street tavern by a bevy of prostitutes, one of whom strokes his chest while the other relieves him of his pocket watch.

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Howard Carter

During the short winter season, some of the wealthier foreigners dabbled in archaeology driven by scientific curiosity and inquisitiveness. But the ultimate – an intact tomb of the Pharaoh had not yet been found. One man hoped to change that. Howard Carter, the sickly son of an English painter, had first come to Egypt as an artist at the age of 17. He fell in love with the ancient ruins and proved a capable archaeologist despite a difficult personality.

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Intro to "Lincoln: The Untold Stories

In the years following his violent death, Abraham Lincoln became the most revered President in American history. But as time passed, what would happen to the story of the real man behind the myth?

Lincoln’s friend, William Herndon, wanted to leave an accurate and personal record. He spent thirty years documenting the most confidential memories of Lincoln’s closest friends and family. But for more than a century, these recollections were buried in a disorganized and nearly illegible collection of papers filed away in the Library of Congress.

Now, Herndon’s documents are surfacing for the first time and what they reveal is a portrait of Lincoln as an earthy, fallible and often troubled man. Join us as we go in search of history to discover -- Lincoln: The Untold Stories.

(Performance notes: introduction ran 1:00m on air.)

Submitted by TxTom

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Jacqueline Kennedy

Soon after Jacqueline’s husband was elected President of the United States in 1960, she confessed, “I feel as though I had just turned into a piece of public property”, And yet, however daunting the prospect of becoming a national icon, Mrs. Kennedy embraced her role with winning enthusiasm and supreme political savvy.

Throughout her husband’s political career, Jackie proved his perfect match in wit and finesse. Early on in his 1960 presidential campaign, her uncommonly chic wardrobe caught the attention of the press, all but eclipsing her less stylish rival, Pat Nixon. In response to a particularly sensational article claiming that she spent $30,000 a year to support her addiction to Parisian Couture, Mrs. Kennedy quipped, “I couldn’t spend that much unless I wore sable underwear”.

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Jerry Seinfeld

The move to New York meant returning to his roots for Seinfeld, who was born April 29, 1954, in Brooklyn and raised in the Long Island town of Massapequa (which he has always joked was an old Indian name meaning “by the mall”). After graduating from Queens College, Seinfeld appeared at New York comedy spots while supporting himself with odd jobs, including selling lightbulbs over the phone and waiting tables at Brew and Burger. As his act grew more polished, he honed the wry observational style that was to become his trademark.

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Jim Carrey

Famous for screen roles featuring rubber-jawed antics, bodily contortions, and bathroom humor, comic star Jim Carrey has been called Jerry Lewis on speed, Dick Van Dyke on acid, and Mr. Slapstick. In 1998, however, the critical commentary about his latest film was in a very different vein. Words like “breakthrough” and “revelation” and “career expanding” were used, as well as a term not previously applied to his cinematic efforts: “possible Oscar”.

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John F. Kennedy, Jr.

The story of John F. Kennedy Jr., heir to America’s most famous and star-crossed political family, begins with the marriage of his parents in 1953. Jack Kennedy was the junior senator from Massachusetts – a handsome young man, who had inherited the Kennedy family’s political ambitions when his older brother Joe was killed in World War II. Kennedy’s bride, Jacqueline Bouvier, was one of America’s most beautiful debutantes. She had worked as an inquiring photographer for the Washington Times Herald, and had met Jack the year before at a Washington dinner party. Their wedding was the social event of the year.

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John Glenn

When the U.S. Manned Space Program began in 1958, John Glenn was selected to be one of the original seven Mercury astronauts. When Glenn successfully piloted his “Friendship 7” spacecraft three times around Earth in just less than five hours on February 20, 1962, he became an instant national hero. In fact, he may have become too heroic for his own good--although Glenn was anxious to go up again, President Kennedy reportedly pulled him from flight status, worried what would happen if a figure of such adulation should perish in a future flight.

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John Irving

Hollywood producers have long turned to the printed page for material; and there is an especially large number of film adaptations right now. One writer with a lot of experience seeing his creations come to life on the screen is John Irving, four of his 10 novels have been made into movies. His highly praised 1978 bestseller, “The World According to Garp,” became a film in 1982, a dark comedy directed by George Roy Hill and starring Robin Williams. The novelist himself played a very minor role in “Garp” -- as a wrestling referee. Two years later, director Tony Richardson took Irving’s story of a family of innkeepers, “ Hotel New Hampshire,” to the screen. Simon Birch -- released in 1998 -- was loosely based on Irving’s novel, “A Prayer for Owen Meany.” and “ the Cider House Rules” is in theaters now. Irving spent 14 years getting this novel to the screen. The 57-year old Irving chronicled his experiences in the film industry in a book titled “My Movie Business,” which was published late last year.

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John Jasper

John Jasper was a noted slave preacher who became a significant community leader in Richmond, Virginia, following the Civil War. Born and raised on a plantation in Fluvanna County, Virginia, Jasper at the age of 13 was hired out to work in tobacco factories in Richmond and later in the coal mines of Chesterfield County. Self-educated and devoutly Christian, Jasper became a very popular slave preacher, in great demand particularly for his funeral orations.

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John Muir Quote

In God's wildness lies the hope of the world - the great fresh unblighted, unredeemed wilderness. The galling harness of civilization drops off, and wounds heal ere we are aware. From the unpublished journals of John Muir.

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John Singer Sargent

Although an American, John Singer Sargent did not even see the United States until he was 20. He was born in Florence on January 12, 1856. His mother, an amateur artist, had persuaded her doctor husband, that her sickly constitution required the healing climes of Europe. Her son remained an expatriate for the rest of his life, making only ten trips to the United States. The young Sargent learned to speak French, Italian, and German as the family flitted to southern European cities to escape the cold, and to resorts in the Alps and the Pyrenees to escape the heat.

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John Wilkes Booth

As war raged across the country, John Wilkes Booth became a star. In 1862, he performed in St. Louis, Chicago, Baltimore, New York, Boston, Louisville, Lexington, and Cincinnati. He was Hamlet, McBeth, Othello, and Romeo. Appearing 167 times, Booth played 18 different roles in the course of a single year.

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Leni Reifenstahl

Visionary – the images she created on film proved she was a genius at making motion pictures. She hasn’t directed a movie in more than 50 years, but remains the most famous woman filmmaker in history, and the most despised. Leni Reifenstahl was called “Hitler’s director.” Some contend she was also Hitler’s lover, which she disputes, but there is no disputing the influence of her movies – especially Triumph of the Will, perhaps the most powerful propaganda film ever made. In her hands, a movie camera became a magnifying glass, capable of enlarging Adolf Hitler into a giant. Reifenstahl claims she never uttered an anti-Semitic word, and never knew what Hitler was doing. But many others insist she was a war criminal, and her weapon wasn’t a rifle or poison gas, but her films.

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Libby Larsen

Libby Larsen is a composer committed to the idea of modern music that is accessible to a broad audience. And although she earned her doctorate in composition, she makes her living solely on commissioned works.

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Lincoln: The Untold Stories

On the night of April 14, 1865, an actor named John Wilkes Booth quietly worked his way through the halls of Ford’s Theater in Washington D.C. President Abraham Lincoln was enjoying one of the first moments of restful entertainment he had experienced since the Civil War began. Then, shortly after 10 P.M. Wilkes slipped into the unguarded presidential box.

Firing one shot at close range, Wilkes killed the President. A nation went into mourning over the loss of the remarkable man who had reunited a divided country. In the days following Lincoln’s death, his former law partner, William Herndon grieved as he watched thousands of Americans pay their final respects to their fallen leader.

For seventeen years, Herndon sat across from Lincoln in a series of law offices in Springfield, Illinois -- one of which still exists across the street from the old state capitol.
But as Herndon perceived the public’s desire to mythologize his former partner, he felt a need to search for the facts and truths of Lincoln’s life...not fictions...not fables.

Submitted by TxTom

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Lorraine Hansberry

Lorraine Hansberry was a playwright, born in Chicago. She is best known as the author of A Raisin in the Sun. A Broadway success and later a movie, the novel explored the struggles of a black family to escape from the ghetto. Hansberry died prematurely in 1965, before she was able to fulfill her promise as an eloquent spokesperson for African-Americans’ trials and aspirations.

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Louisa May Alcott

Writer. Born November 29, 1832, in Germantown, Pennsylvania, the second of four daughters of Amos Bronson Alcott, a noted transcendentalist philosopher and educator, and Abigail May, a descendant of one of Boston's more prominent families.

Though she produced adult novels and stories as well, Alcott is most celebrated for her children's fiction, which includes the eight novels grouped under the Little Women series. Autobiographical in nature, Alcott's Little Women books were modeled after her parents and sisters as well as friends and neighbors in her native New England, and she is credited with being a pioneer in the creation of realistic fiction for children. Her novels are noted for their perceptive and highly entertaining accounts of childhood, for her portrayal of children as multi-dimensional, thinking individuals, and for her lively and warm depictions of family life. Alcott enjoyed widespread popularity in her lifetime as a children's author, while today books like Little Women and Little Men—which have been translated into numerous foreign languages—are still read and appreciated by children around the world.

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Lucky Man

Lucky Man – A memoir by Michael J. Fox

Chapter One - A Wake-up Call
Gainseville, Florida – November 1990

I woke to find the message in my left hand. It had me trembling. It wasn’t a fax, telegram, memo, or the usual sort of missive bringing disturbing news. In fact, my hand held nothing at all. The trembling was the message.


I was feeling a little disoriented. I’d only been shooting the movie in Florida for a week or so, and the massive, pink-laquered, four-poster bed surrounded by the pastel hues of the University Center Hotel’s Presidential Suite still came as a bit of a shock each morning.


It was Tuesday morning, so while I couldn’t recall the exact details of the previous night’s debauchery, it was a pretty safe bet that it had something to do with Monday Night Football. In those first few seconds of consciousness, I didn’t know what time it was, but I could be fairly certain that I hadn’t overslept. If I was needed on set, there would have been a phone call from my assistant, Brigette.

If I had to leave the hotel at 10:00 A.M., let’s say, she would have called at 9:30, again at 9:40, then finally at 9:50 she would have taken the elevator from her floor up to mine, let herself into my room, propelled me to the shower, and slipped into the kitchen to brew a pot of coffee.

None of this having transpired, I knew I had at least a few minutes.
Even with the lights off, blinds down, and drapes pulled, an offensive amount of light still filtered into the room. Eyes clenched shut, I placed the palm of my left hand across the bridge of my nose in a weak attempt to block the glare.

A moth’s wing—or so I though—fluttered against my right cheek. I opened my eyes, keeping my hand suspended an inch or two in front of my face so I could finger-flick the little beastie across the room. That’s when I noticed my pinkie. It was trembling, twitching, auto-animated. How long this had been going on I wasn’t exactly sure. But now that I noticed it, I was surprised to discover that I couldn’t stop it.
Weird—maybe I slept on it funny. Five or six times in rapid succession I pumped my left hand into a fist, followed by a vigorous shaking out. Interlocking the fingers of each hand steeple-style with their opposite number, I lifted them up and over behind my head and pinned them to the pillow.


Tap. Tap. Tap. Like a moisture-free Chinese water torture, I could feel a gentle drumming at the back of my skull. If it was trying to get my attention, it had succeeded. I withdrew my left hand from behind my head and held it in front of my face, steadily, with fingers splayed—like the bespectacled X-ray glasses geek in the old comic book ad. I didn’t have to see the underlying skeletal structure; the information I was looking for was right there in the flesh; a thumb, three stock-still fingers, and out there on the lunatic fringe, a spastic pinkie.

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Lucky Man Part 2

If I had to leave the hotel at 10:00 A.M., let’s say, she would have called at 9:30, again at 9:40, then finally at 9:50 she would have taken the elevator from her floor up to mine, let herself into my room, propelled me to the shower, and slipped into the kitchen to brew a pot of coffee.

None of this having transpired, I knew I had at least a few minutes.
Even with the lights off, blinds down, and drapes pulled, an offensive amount of light still filtered into the room. Eyes clenched shut, I placed the palm of my left hand across the bridge of my nose in a weak attempt to block the glare.

A moth’s wing—or so I though—fluttered against my right cheek. I opened my eyes, keeping my hand suspended an inch or two in front of my face so I could finger-flick the little beastie across the room. That’s when I noticed my pinkie. It was trembling, twitching, auto-animated. How long this had been going on I wasn’t exactly sure. But now that I noticed it, I was surprised to discover that I couldn’t stop it.

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Mae West

Mae West was the daughter of a boxer and a corset model, who became a vaudevillian at the age of fourteen. At thirty three, in 1926, she wrote, produced and directed a Broadway show called 'Sex', and landed in jail on obscenity charges. After wowing Broadway in 'Diamond Lil', she signed with Paramount in 1932 and moved to Hollywood. Her risque 1930s comedies were ground-breaking, in terms of both sexual content and roles for women. Her films included 'Night After Night' and 'She Done Him Wrong', which was the film version of 'Diamond Lil', and broke all existing box-office records, credited with saving Paramount from having to sell out to its rival, MGM.

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Mariah Carey

That stunning voice--no one can deny its power. It's one of the reasons why fans have made Mariah Carey the only artist to have a hit single every year of the '90s. Now known as one of pop's most powerful performers, it took 20 years for the girl from Long Island to become a pop princess--and even less time to watch as some of the luster faded from her glittery life. Born to an opera-singing mother and a Venezuelan father, Carey struggled with identity issues as a young woman. While living in Manhattan trying to jumpstart her music career, Carey took on a series of odd jobs, including singing backup for Brenda K. Starr. But it was a chance meeting with Tommy Mottola, the president of Columbia Records, that would change her life. Mottola quickly signed Carey to her first record contract, and the two later married. To outsiders, it seemed a perfect end to the fairy tale. But in 1997, the fairy tale ended when divorce hit. She dropped Columbia for a multimillion-dollar deal with Virgin. And then, with the less-than-stellar performance of her new single and her first starring role in the movie Glitter, Mariah Carey found herself in a hospital recuperating from exhaustion.

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Mary Pickford

Forget Julia Roberts—Mary Pickford was America’s first sweetheart. Audiences couldn’t get enough. When she took Hollywood by storm in 1909, at 17 years old, Mary appeared in 51 movies. In her first year, she made 51 films, that’s almost one a week!

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Moe Howard: Not Such A Stooge

Moe was the business-minded one of the group. He knew that Curly liked to spend his money on partying and women, and Larry liked to spend his at the racetrack. So, he drew up an agreement where Larry and Curly turned over a certain percentage of their salaries to him. He, in turn, invested it for them. The result was that, while Larry and Curly were not as wealthy as Moe was (he invested far more of his own money in real estate and was quite well off), he ensured that their spendthrift habits did not result in their being broke when their careers ended.

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Monet

What Monet found in Venice, according to Mirbeau, was a chance to renew himself by tackling the preconceived images of Venice. He no longer hoped to conquer the light, only to "glide" on the surface of the canvas, in the same way that light glides over things or in the same way that "the most intelligent dancer translates a feeling." Monet’s Venise was celebrated, almost unanimously, as one of the great feats in the history of painting. Up to that point, Monet had never been so unreservedly lauded. The irony is that soon after World War I these much praised Venetian images fell into oblivion, no longer eliciting the sort of praise they had obtained when first exhibited.

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Motown 25

Motown's 25th anniversary was one of Michael Jackson's first public acts as a star outside and beyond the Jacksons, and it was clear that he was not only one of the most thrilling live performers in pop music, but that he was perhaps more capable of inspiring an audience's imagination than any single pop artist since Elvis Presley. There are times when you know you are hearing or seeing something extraordinary, something that captures the hopes and dreams popular music might aspire to, and that might unite and inflame a new audience, and that time came that night, on TV screens across the nation – the sight of a young man staking out his territory, and just starting to lay claim to his rightful pop legend.

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Mozart

Born with absolute pitch, infallible rhythm, and a natural comprehension of harmony, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had come into this world with a complete gift. This is how, at the age of four, the child began to play the clavier, and at five, picked up a violin and, reading at sight, staggered through six trios with his father and a friend. The child read and wrote musical notes before he could do as much with letters. Compositions dating from his sixth year are recognizable from the opening bars as the music of Mozart, and nobody else. Graceful and sure, spirited, precise, and brave, they are the work of a unique stylist and a great soul.

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Neil Armstrong

Astronaut Neil Armstrong developed a fascination with flight at an early age and earned his student pilot's license when he was 16. In 1947, Armstrong began his studies in aeronautical engineering at Purdue University on a U.S. Navy scholarship.

His studies, however, were interrupted in 1949 when he was called to serve in the Korean War. A U.S. Navy pilot, Armstrong flew 78 combat missions during this military conflict. He left the service in 1952, and returned to college. A few years later, Armstrong joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), which later became the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). For this government agency he worked in a number of different capacities, including serving as a test pilot and an engineer. He tested many high-speed aircraft, including the X-15, which could reach a top speed of 4,000 miles per hour.

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Nero - Intro

He was a perverse cross-dressing exhibitionist who had an incestuous relationship with his mother and married his step sister. He murdered members of his own family in fits of jealous rage. His cruelty, violence, and grotesque appetite for self-indulgence brought the Roman empire to the brink of financial and political ruin. And he viscously persecuted the christians. They would remember him as the ultimate embodiment of evil ... the anti-christ.

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Norman Rockwell

Norman Rockwell did 322 covers for the weekly magazine the Saturday evening post over nearly half a century. All of them, along with the original oils that became the covers and ads, are part of the first comprehensive exhibition of the artist's work since his death in 1978 -- now on display at Washington’s Corcoran gallery of art. There are images commissioned for boy scout calendars and advertisements -- each capturing a slice of American life.

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Nostradamus

Nostradamus. His name has resounded through the centuries; shadowed in legend and mystery. Who was this amazing 16th century mystic who accurately predicted future world events more than 400 years before they actually happened? These unbelievable predictions include the French Revolution, the rise and fall of Napoleon, the rise of Adolph Hitler, the Kennedy assassinations and man’s walk on the moon!

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Pablo Picasso

A woman is a woman, according to history. But to Pablo Picasso, a woman was something else again. A combination of lines, forms, and colors. Picasso changed the combination to suit his moods, and his result was seldom Eve-like. The woman may have elephant ears, crossed eyes, two noses. In the name of art, Picasso transformed natural appearances for well over half a century. People who don’t like unconventional art say he spoofed the public, and the public itself often scoffed at his works. When his chief masterpiece, Guernica, was first shown, many thought it looked like a jigsaw puzzle. But a multitude of artists now following in his footsteps believe Picasso was liberating art from age-old academic tradition.

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Pat Benatar

Pat Benatar was born Patricia Andrzejewski in New York on January 10, 1953. In the 1980s, Pat reigned supreme as the biggest solo female rocker in the US and possibly the world. It could be said that Pat came from meager beginnings in Long Island, New York. Her dad was a sheet metal worker and her mom was a cosmetologist. Pat's earliest jobs included working at a Friendly's restaurant and a bank. She began signing and practicing her vocals while young. After singing in New York during the late 70s, Pat was discovered at the "Catch A Rising Star" club and soon had a major record label deal in 1978 with Chrysalis Records.

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Patty Hearst

Finally, after all the bizarre communiqués, cryptic messages and life on the run, Patty Hearst confronts reality...... Yet her parents had new fears. Patty, who drove the getaway car in the fatal Carmichael Park robbery could face murder charges. Her parents reached out to protect her and they got the best lawyer money could buy. F. Lee Bailey.

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Pillsbury Doughboy Dead At 81

Pillsbury Doughboy Dead at 81
The Pillsbury Doughboy died Monday of a severe yeast infection and complications from repeated pokes to the belly. He was 81.
Doughboy was buried in a lightly greased coffin.
Dozens of celebrities turned out, including Mrs. Butterworth, Hungry Jack, Betty Crocker, The Hostess Twinkies, and Cap’n Crunch. The California Rasins Choir sang The Loafs's Prayer.
The grave site was piled high with flours as longtime friend Aunt Jemima delivered the eulogy, describing Doughboy as a man who, "never knew how much he was kneaded".
Doughboy rose quickly in show business but his later life was filled with many turnovers. He was not considered a very smart cookie, wasting much of his dough on half-baked schemes.
Despite his being a little flaky at times, and even crusty as an old man, he was considered a roll model for millions.
Toward the end it was thought he'd rise once again, but he was no tart.
His second wife, Play Dough, survives Doughboy. They have two children and one in the oven. Mrs. Dough said of their 60 year relationship, "It was a piece of cake."
The funeral was held at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes. May he rest in yeast, I mean peace.

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Pillsbury Doughboy Dead at 81

The Pillsbury Doughboy died Monday of a severe yeast infection and complications from repeated pokes to the belly. He was 81.

Doughboy was buried in a lightly greased coffin.

Dozens of celebrities turned out, including Mrs. Butterworth, Hungry Jack, Betty Crocker, The Hostess Twinkies, and Captain Crunch. The California Rasins Choir sang The Loafs's Prayer.

The grave site was pilled high with flours as longtime friend Aunt Jemima delivered the eulogy, describing Doughboy as a man who, "never knew how much he was kneaded".

Doughboy rose quickly in show business but his later life was filled with many turnovers. He was not considered a very smart cookie, wasting much of his dough on half-baked schemes.

Despite his being a little flaky at times, and even crusty as an old man, he was considered a roll model for millions.

Toward the end it was thought he'd rise once again, but he was no tart.

His second wife, Play Dough, survives Doughboy. They have two children and one in the oven. Mrs. Dough said of their 60 year relationship, "It was a piece of cake."

The funeral was held at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes. May he rest in yeast, I mean peace.

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Prince William

Prince William may still be a schoolboy at Eton, but he’s already a presence on the international stage. Since the death of his mother, Princess Diana, William has begun to replace her as the star of the Royal Family. When Diana died, he behaved with a grace and dignity beyond his years, impressing millions of television viewers as he marched solemnly behind her coffin en route to the funeral.

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Queen Elizabeth I

Elizabeth I, daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife Anne Boleyn, ruled England from 1558 to 1603 during what is known as the Elizabethan Age. Elizabeth’s reign was a time of great prosperity and achievement, and her court was center for poets. Elizabeth I, one of England’s greatest sovereigns, had her grandfather’s frugality and care and her father’s imperious manner and his ability to charm and overwhelm. She had a sense of what people wanted and would allow, and she had the judgement to pick able and devoted ministers.

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Rasputin - The Mad Monk

St. Petersburg, for over 200 years, the capitol of imperial Russia. In 1916, with the empire locked in a disastrous war and on the verge of a shattering revolution, St. Petersburg teemed with rumors about a man they called “Temnyi” - “The Dark One.” Grigori Rasputin.

They said he was a lustful, mad monk. A holy devil who preached the word of God and practiced every form of corruption. They said he had hypnotized the mighty Tzar and seduced his wife, the Tzarina. In fact, Raspuitn was allowed even into the bedrooms of the Tzar’s children.

Of the reason for his presence was a closely guarded secret. He, and he alone, could soothe and heal the desperately sick child who was the heir to the Romanov throne.

Even while he was alive, legend replaced reality in stories about Rasputin. His bizarre death only confirmed his reputation as the very embodiment of evil...a reputation which endures to this day.

The truth about the rise of Grigori Rasputin is stranger, more powerful and more moving than the legend of the satanic mad monk.

--submitted by TxTom

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Sean Connery

He was born Thomas Sean Connery in Fountainbridge, Scotland, on August 25, 1930, the son of Joe, a truck driver, and Euphamia, a 20-year-old housewife. The neighborhood was known as “the street of a thousand smells” for the stench of the local rubber mill and several breweries that always filled the air. Connery’s home was a two-room flat in “tenement land”, where the infant slept in a bureau drawer because his parents couldn’t afford a crib.

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Shell Silverstien Interview

I would hope that people, no matter what age, would find something to identify with in my books, pick up one and experience a personal sense of discovery. That's great. I think that if you're creative person, you should just go about your business, do your work and not care about how it's received. I never read reviews because if you believe the good ones you have to believe the bad ones too. Not that I don't care about success. I do, but only because it lets me do what I want. I was always prepared for success but that means that I have to be prepared for failure too. I have an ego, I have ideas, I want to be articulate, to communicate but in my own way. People who say they create only for themselves and don't care if they are published... I hate to hear talk like that. If it's good, it's too good not to share. That's the way I feel about my work. So I'll keep on communicating, but only my way. Lots of things I won't do. I won't go on television because who am I talking to? Johnny Carson? The camera? Twenty million people I can't see? Uh-uh. And I won't give any more interviews.

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Sherlock Holmes

Good evening, and welcome to Masterpiece Theatre. I’m your host for this evening’s production, which returns us to the shadowy and intriguing world of London’s legendary detective, Sherlock Holmes. Holmes, speaking about his diabolically clever adversary, Professor Moriarty, once told his friend and colleague Dr. Watson: “He is the Napoleon of crime, Watson. He is the organizer of half that is evil and of nearly all that is undetected in this great city.”

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Sheryl Crow

Long before she was a roots rock sensation, Sheryl Crow honed her skills by singing backup for Don Henley and Michael Jackson and jamming with other L.A.-based musicians in the Tuesday Night Music Club. But by the time her catchy single "All I Wanna Do" stormed the radio and earned her three Grammys in '94, it was clear she'd make it as a solo singer/songwriter.

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Sir Alec Guinness

Sir Alec Guinness was born in London in 1914, began his professional acting career in 1933, and soon established himself as one of the outstanding stage and screen actors of his generation. (SFX: Whistling "Kwai Theme' under) His many films include Oliver Twist, Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai (for which he won an Oscar), and the Star Wars Trilogy (SFX: "The Force will be with you, Always")

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Spice Girls

The Spice Girls burst onto the British music scene in 1996, earning both the adoration and derision that accompany nearly instant fame. From the start, they’ve been almost universally derided in the music industry as a synthetic, mass-marketing tool. Unlike the “Fab Four” Beatles, who had spent years songwriting and playing in clubs before they were discovered, the Spice Girls were essentially manufactured, and thus dubbed by critics as the “Pre-fab Five”.

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Steven Foster

Steven Foster was perhaps the first American composer to support himself with his music. He wrote many songs for the minstrel shows that were popular at the time, especially the christy minstrels. Altogether, Steven Foster wrote over 200 songs including “Oh Susannah,” “My Old Kentucky Home” (the state song of Kentucky), “Swanee River” (the state song of Florida), “Camptown Races,” “Jeannie with the Light Brown Hair,” and “Beautiful Dreamer.”

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Stevie Nicks -- Vh1 – Behind The Music

In the spring of 1987, Stevie Nicks checked herself into the Betty Ford clinic to end more than a decade of cocaine abuse. After undergoing a 30-day treatment, she was released. Stevie was determined to stay clean and anxious to continue her demanding career. She immediately went into the studio to record Tango in the Night with Fleetwood Mac. It would be their last album together for more than a decade. (music cue – “Seven Wonders”) By early 1988, Stevie Nicks was running out of steam. She was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. After four months on the Tango in the Night tour, her final few shows had to be canceled.

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Ted Turner Inc Magazine

Plucking at his mustache, his eyes glancing this way then that, the old lion slips inside the door of a faceless meeting room in an upscale downtown Atlanta hotel, the better to reconnoiter his latest field of battle. The chandelier-lit room brims with young people, male, female, black, white and brown. Almost all of them too young to remember what television news was like before Ted Turner and CNN arrived on the scene more than four decades ago.

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The Answer is Blowin’ in the Wind

The Answer is Blowin’ in the Wind of Emails

My instruments of physics
were algebra, calculus, and my primordial internet.
That internet was powered by my hyper-global network of 65,536 computers.
I wanted to broaden mathematics
from the blackboard
to the motherboard.
I broadened it when I solved
the largest algebraic equations
—not on the blackboard—
but on and across 65,536 computers
that uniformly encircled a hyper-globe.
I broaden it again
when I solved those 65,536 challenging problems
at the fastest rates
of arithmetical computations.
The codes for solving my equations were emailed
across a record 1,048,576 email wires.
I emailed 65,536 codes
into my record 65,536 computers.
Moving my algebraic problem
from the blackboard
to the motherboard was like moving it
from the practical
to the precious.
I visualized my hyper-global network
of 65,536 computers
as my mathematics machine
that I could use to solve partial differential equations
of calculus.
But that machine is also my instrument of physics.
The reason is that my partial differential equations
are powerful mathematical expressions
that encoded the motions of air and moisture.
The physical answer
is the winds, pressure, and temperatures
across Earth’s atmosphere.
My quest included the search for the same answers
for the motions of water
in rivers, lakes, and oceans.
And, finally, for the motion of oil, water, and gas
inside petroleum reservoirs.

I visualized my answers in the winds
blowing via emails
across a global network of computers
that encircled the Earth.

I continued visualizing that blowing wind
as the motion of electronic messages
across my primordial internet
that was outlined, defined, and powered
by 65,536, or 64 binary thousand, computers.
Those emails travelled to and from each computer.
They travelled
along the sixteen orthogonal directions
of my hyper-global network of
1,048,576, or one binary million, email wires.

As a computer arithmetician,
I anchored all my computations
on the laws of physics.
When a mathematician loses his way
on his around-the-world quest
for the deepest understanding of global warming
the laws of physics serve as signs
pointing back to his original path.
The Second Law of Motion,
in physics,
became my compass
with needles that always pointed
toward the North,
or the eternal truth .
The laws of physics are my timeless truths
even after I have left my storyboard
for my blackboard and motherboards
and arrived at my primordial internet.

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The Big Apple

In the early years of the nineteenth century, refugees from war-torn Europe began arriving in New York.

Many were remnants of the crumbling French aristocracy, forced to seek refuge abroad from the dreaded guillotine.

Among these was a Madamoiselle Evelyn Claudine de Saint-Evremond, who arrived in 1803.

Daughter of a noted courtier, wit, and litterateur, and herself a favorite of Marie Antoinette, Evelyn was by all accounts beautiful, vivacious, and well-educated and soon became a society favorite.

For reasons never disclosed, however, a planned marriage the following year to John Hamilton, son of the late Alexander Hamilton, was called off at the last minute.

Soon after, with support from several highly placed admirers, Evelyn established a salon (which apparently was an elegantly furnished bordello) in a substantial house that still stands at 142 Bond Street, then one of the city's most exclusive residential districts.

Evelyn's establishment quickly became known as the most entertaining and discreet of the city's many bordellos, known for its elegant dinners, high-stakes gambling, and witty conversation.

When New Yorkers insisted on anglicizing her name to "Eve," Evelyn apparently found the biblical reference highly amusing, and referred to the temptresses in her employ as "my irresistable apples."

The young men about town soon referred to their amorous adventures as "having a taste of Eve's Apples."

The rest is etymological history, and the city is now often called "The Big Apple."

Contributed by Richurd

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The Kennedy Children

Forty-three year old Jack Kennedy, two-term senator from Massachusetts, was the youngest President ever elected. His wife, 31-year old Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, a former New York debutante, was the youngest first lady.
Baby John junior and his three year old sister Caroline, were conspicuously missing when their father was sworn in as the 35th President of the United States on January 21st, 1961. John and Caroline stayed at home with their nanny. Jackie, who grew up with an alcoholic father, was determined to give her kids as normal a childhood as possible – even in the White House.
Outsiders were warned to keep a proper distance from John junior and Caroline. Jackie made sure that even the secret service were not to pamper these kids. She’d say she didn’t want grown men picking up after her children. She’d tell the secret service “when we’re at the beach, drowning is my responsibility – I’ll take care of them”.

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The King's Speech

After the death of King George V and the abdication of King Edward VIII, Bertie who has suffered from a debilitating speech impediment all his life, is suddenly crowned King of England. With his country on the brink of war and in desperate need of a leader, he arranges to see an eccentric speech therapist, Lionel Logue. After a rough start, the two delve into an unorthodox course of treatment and eventually form an unbreakable bond. With the support of Logue, his family, and his government, the King will overcome his stammer and deliver a radio-address that inspires his people and unites them in battle.

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The Lake Isle of Innisfree

THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE (W.B.YEATS)

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee;
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight's all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
And evening full of the linnet's wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day
I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,
I hear it in the deep heart's core.

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The Three Stooges - A& E Biography

Almost everyone is familiar with the screen characters of Moe, Larry and Curly, and most people know Shemp, Joe Besser and Curly Joe. These six men formed the world’s most loved comedy team, The Three Stooges.This is the other side of the story, the men behind the mayhem. Believe it or not, Moe was not always the leader of The Three Stooges, in fact when they first started, the boys were practically interchangeable. The development of their screen characters is an evolution which took years of refinement.

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The Yardbirds

Led Zeppelin began as an offshoot of the Yardbirds, the famed British band that launched guitar legends Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck. In 1966, Jimmy Page had taken over as lead guitarist. But the Yardbirds were already falling apart. When the Yardbirds finally imploded, Page was only too keen. He set about rounding up a new band.

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Thomas Edison

Shuffling about his laboratory at Menlo Park, New Jersey, a shock of hair over one side of his forehead, sharp blue eyes sparkling, stains and chemical burns on his wrinkled clothing, Thomas Edison never looked like a man whose inventions had revolutionized the world in less than a lifetime. Certainly, he never acted like it. Once, when a visiting dignitary asked him whether he had received many medals and awards, he said, “Oh, yes, Mom’s got a quart of them up at the house.” “Mom” was his wife. Yet every day he demonstrated what a giant among men he was. Great were his contributions to mankind. He patented a record 1,093 inventions in his lifetime.

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Thomas Jefferson

One of our greatest Presidents of the past was born at the foot of the Blue Ridge, near Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1743. Thomas Jefferson set the real American standard of living when at only 33, he penned the Declaration of Independence. “I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.” Unlike Washington, he was never in battle. He was a civilian hero. Though he could not free the slaves, he tried to, and succeeded as nearly as possible without destroying the new nation by a civil war. Jefferson shoulders his way to a place with Lincoln and Washington on the strength of moral greatness and manifold genius.

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Tiger Woods

Professional golfer, born Eldrick Woods on December 30, 1975, in Orlando, Florida. Early on, Tiger’s parents introduced their only child to the sport he has come to dominate, giving him a sawed-off putter to practice with as soon as he could stand up on his own. At the age of 8, he won the first of six Optimist International Junior World Titles. After perhaps the most remarkable amateur career ever—he won the U.S. Junior Amateur Championships in 1991, 1992, and 1993, and the U.S. Amateur title in 1994, 1995, and 1996—and two years at Stanford University, where he won the NCAA title, Woods turned pro in the summer of 1996.

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Timothy Mcveigh—History Channel

That hate is fueled at Ruby Ridge where federal agents launch a raid on the remote cabin of Randy Weaver- killing his wife and son, a federal agent also dies. A few months later, still feeling lost, living at home, McVeigh reconnects with his Second Amendment soul mate and army buddy, Terry Nichols- visiting from Michigan. By early 1993 McVeigh decides to abandon New York and sets out in search of what he calls a "free state" where he plans to step up his involvement with survivalists and gun rights activists.

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TLC-- Vh1 - Behind The Music

Sickness, arson, and bankruptcy threatened to silence TLC forever. But when faced with the type of adversity that has ripped other groups apart, Tionne, Lisa, and Chili closed ranks. It seems as if the odds have been stacked against the members of TLC their entire lives. Long before they ever shared a stage, each endured poverty, the pain of a broken home, and the resolve to rise above it.

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Tony Curtis

Tony Curtis was born Bernard Schwartz on June 3, 1925, in the Bronx, the son of Hungarian immigrants. As a young man he joined the Navy and after being wounded in Guam in World War II, took up acting in New York City. In the late 1940s, Universal Studios signed Curtis and launched him on a feature-film career that included roles as varied as Houdini, the Boston Strangler, and, in one of his most memorable performances, a cross-dressing musician who courts Marilyn Monroe.

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Virginia Woolf

Born Adeline Virginia Stephen, on January 25, 1882, in London, England.

One of the most notable and prolific Modernist writers, Virginia Woolf wrote nine novels, one play, over five volumes of essays, portraits, memoirs, and reviews, more than fourteen volumes of diaries and letters, and forty-six short stories. In her novels, Woolf evolved a way of writing that demands engagement from a reader with a novel's structure as well as with its content. From the moment she began writing, Woolf had a literary career plan: to reshape the novel as it was then known. Each of her novels exists as a testament to Virginia Woolf's self-conscious evolution as an experimental writer.

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Wallace And Edward

“God Bless W.E.”, the note reads, on a piece of slightly crumpled stationery from Belton House. “W.E.” as in Wallace and Edward, soon to be together at last, trapped for all time in the long, sad aftermath of the century’s number one celebrity love affair.

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Whitney Warren

In 1903, a competition was announced for the design of a new Grand Central Terminal.

All the great NewYork firms proposed plans, but architect Whitney Warren had the inside track. He was a cousin and social acquaintance of William Kissam Vanderbilt, or "Willy K" as his friends called him.

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Who was this man?

From 1921 to 1925, he won first place in 91 of the 137 races he ran. He placed second or third in 34 more of them.
In 1922, he ran the 100 metre in 9.7 seconds - a British record that lasted 35 years.
He was first considered a traitor, then a great hero to his country.
He knew the meaning of complete victory and complete surrender.
He became world famous for what he would not do. He then went on to do what no one thought he could do.
His life has been celebrated in a film (Chariots of Fire) that won the honor of Best Picture.Who was this man?

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Who Was Winston Churchill?

Born to an aristocratic family in 1874, Winston Churchill served in the British Army before earning election to Parliament in 1900. After becoming prime minister in 1940, Churchill helped lead a successful Allied strategy to defeat the Axis powers and craft post-war peace.

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William Shakespeare

What does Shakespeare say to an era that feels that the times are out of joint? He does not renounce the world or wallow in self pity. He is the poet of this worldliness. Shakespeare distills his experiences into common sense and uncommon wisdom. In the hands of lesser playwrights, nobility often rests on the splendor of the language, but beautiful lines alone may rest no further than the ear. Shakespeare speaks to the soul. He could do anything he wanted with language. The way he talks of a thing conjures up the thing itself. He packed worlds into single syllables. “To be or not to be,” is man’s largest question put in man’s smallest and simplest words.

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Winston Churchill

The last of the great statesmen, Winston Churchill, a man of multiple genius, will be fondly remembered as one of the most exasperating figures in history. Before moments of British crisis, he was so frequently right that his ability to foresee future events became a burden to his countrymen. His voice was the voice of Britain’s conscience, the court of last appeal in time of danger. Yet to the day of his retirement, he remained impish, mischievous, and remarkably boyish. Even his appearance seemed to change little over the many years. Churchill’s must be considered the most independent spirit of modern times.

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Zora Neale Hurston

When aspiring writer, Zora Neale Hurston, entered Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue Restaurant on May 1, 1925, she found the air crackling with excitement. More than 300 well dressed women and men circulated through the room, exchanging gossip, laughing, and nervously sipping cocktails.

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“Jack The Ripper”

The denizens of London’s East End; Jack London called them the people of the abyss, “poor miserable human beings clinging to the garbage heap of life.” Against this backdrop would be played one the most provocative unsolved crimes of the 19th century. Investigations continue to this day with growing evidence that while Jack the Ripper’s victims were from England’s lowest class, his deeds directly affected many of the most powerful people in the world.

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“Pink” -- Behind The Music

There was a time when Pink thought Madonna was her mother. Right before her first album came out, Pink said she didn't talk to her real, non-Madonna mom for almost a year when she was younger because she was convinced she was adopted. And while she has since accepted that she was not born of a pop star royal, she just might become one on her own, without the benefit of special blood. She made some noise on the scene in 2000 with her debut, "Can't Take Me Home," which introduced the world to a fiery, neon-haired "white girl who sings like a black girl." It was when she put on garters and a top hat for the smash remake of "Lady Marmalade," though, that people started to say her name at the dinner table. And now that she's got everyone's attention, she's ready to show them what she's got — and that doesn't include a large collection of booty shorts.

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