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The Voice Over Practice Script Library

Script Genres > English Children > Narration > Documentary

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Animal Heroes

Not all heroes are human. Sometimes heroes bark, meow, or even grunt. They may be covered with fur, have curly tails, or live in an alley. We’re about to meet some real-life animal heroes.. Each one of these heroes has performed an amazing rescue. Sometimes they even put themselves in danger to help others. We’ll meet a dog who rescues stray cats. A brave cat who saved her five kittens from a fire. A pig who got help for her owner who was having a heart attack. And a guide dog who led his owner down 71 flights of stairs when the World Trade Center was attacked.

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Ghosts

The dead is meant to move smoothly from the land of the living to their proper place among the spirits. If this transition wrong, the spirit is stranded, neither one thing nor the other. Ghosts having the benefit of hindsight and experience may also give guidance to the living. The novelist, harles Dickens, had seen ghosts himself and they played central roles in his fiction. In one of Dickens’ most popular works, a Christmas Carol, ghosts teach Scrooge the error of his ways and change his wretched life before it is too late.

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Koalas

The Koala is perhaps the best-loved of all Australia’s marsupial, or pouched, mammals. Extra thick fur, especially on the neck and shoulders, helps protect the Koala from even the worst weather (Koalas do not build nests). Opposable thumbs and toes allow for a tight grip when climbing. The Koala cools itself by licking its arm and stretching out as it rests in the trees (Koalas have no sweat glands). The Koala spends most of its time shuffling around the topmost branches of the Eucalyptus, or “gum” trees, hanging on tight with its four grasping feet. It sleeps during the day, curled up in a tree-fork and at night on the leaves and shoots of a few species of Eucalyptus. An adult will eat 500g of leaves a day. The name “koala” means “no drink” and rarely does so. It occasionally comes down to the ground, either to eat soil, which is thought to aid digestion, or to move to another tree.

Koala is the only mammal which can survive on a diet of eucalyptus leaves. Koala seldom drinks water obtaining it from the eucalyptus leaves, which are 50% consisting of water. Although, they drink water if due to drought the leaves water content is reduced. Koalas have a slow metabolic rate due to their high-fiber, low nutrient diet. Because they store little or no fat, koalas must adopt strategies that conserve energy. Sleeping is one of them. Koalas sleep for up to 16 hours per day in order to conserve energy. Koalas spends 75% of its time sleeping. Eucalyptus foliage is very fibrous and low in nutrition, and to most animals are extremely poisonous. Koalas are not drugged out on gum leaves. Koalas digestive system is especially adapted to detoxify the poisonous chemicals in the leaves.

Koalas breed once a year. Mating normally occurs from September to March. The baby Koala, “joey” is blind, hairless, less than one inch long and weighs less than 1 gram. It then crawls into its mothers pouch completely unaided, relying on its sense of smell, strong forelimbs and claws. If a female does not reproduce each year, the young koala stays with her longer and has a greater chance of survival.

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Nature's Recyclers -- Discovery Kids

Did you know that mold and bacteria and higher level organisms like beetles, centipedes and, of course, earthworms are all busy recyclers? By breaking down organic matter -- stuff like dead plants, poop, and decaying animals -- they create valuable nutrients necessary for rich and fertile soil. Take it from me, a worm who knows, we are doing you a big favor.

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Ocean Floor -- Discovery For Kids

Sea slugs live on the ocean floor. They wear pink to say "stay away! We're dangerous!" Katydids are most active at night. They use long 'feelers' called antennae to find their way around in the dark.

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Prehistoric Planet -- Discovery Kids

The whole oligocene is an age of extremes - even the weather. You've got a long, brutally dry summer followed by a long, dry earth-soaking rainy season.

This is our baby dinosaur's first dry season, and the first lesson is water holes like this are gonna be scarce. Plus, they'll be no shortage of fierce competition.

So, beware of the bear dog. Sure, they're only a foot high but every inch is Grade-A vicious predator. Like the name says they're related to bears and dogs. They live in caves or other natural enclosures called dens. A habit that modern bears also picked up. And, right now, this bear dog is defending a den full of her pups. Watch it!

Our mega baby motors back to mom as fast as he can. Get too nosey - you might lose your nose!

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Prehistoric Planet -- Discovery Kids 2

Our prehistoric story includes more then just big dinos. That's right - there were some pretty cool looking mammals, just like you and me. These strange beasts roamed the earth alongside dinosaurs, but are often overlooked.

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Sharks - Animal Planet For Kids

And here they come. 5 tiger sharks are lingering in the water around the cage. We’ve run out of bait, and they’re still hovering. This is going to get REALLY interesting. Now, they’re looking at me as a potential food source!

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Sharks - Animal Planet For Kids

And here they come. 5 tiger sharks are lingering in the water around the cage. We’ve run out of bait, and they’re still hovering. This is going to get REALLY interesting. Now, they’re looking at me as a potential food source!

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SKIN - DISCOVERY KIDS

What keeps all those gushy liquids and solids inside of you? Skin! It's the coating that keeps the insides in and the outside - like germs - out Skin is downright cool! For more information check DiscoveryKids.com

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Skin -- Discovery Kids

What keeps all those wonderfully gushy liquids and solids inside of you? Skin! It's the coating that keeps the inside in and the outside -- like germs -- out. Skin is downright cool! For more information check Discovery Kids.com.

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The Heart

The heart is a beating muscle that pumps blood and nutrients to the body’s cells, however it also needs these life sustaining nutrients to function. The heart receives blood via the coronary arteries. Coronary means crown and the coronary arteries crown or surround the hearts muscles.

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Titanic

People all over the world were shocked to hear that the Titanic had sunk. Only 705 people out of 2,208 passengers and crew were saved.
Why had the ship gone down? they asked.
Why had so many died?
Both the British and the Americans studied the tragedy. They said the Titanic had been going too fast. The captain should have been more careful because fo the ice, and he should have held lifeboat drills. They also said many third-class passengers were warned of danger after the other passengers.

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Tyrannosaurus Rex – Discovery For Kids

Tyrannosaurus rex was 40 feet long, weighed in at 6 tons and stood 15 feet high. Enormous, powerful legs could have stepped over a car in a single stride. Four-foot jaws, raggedly studded with 7-inch teeth could crush bone and consume 500 pounds in a single bite. Clearly this was the ultimate predator — the undisputed master of its Cretaceous world.

Or not. One of the world's top paleontologists says T. rex was not a hunter at all. The fiercest giant of dinosaur lore was but a well-designed scavenger that had much more in common with buzzards and hyenas than with lions and tigers.

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