Voice Over Education Blog

June 6, 2013

by edgeadmin

Things you may not know about Edge Studio

Some people are so enthused with training at Edge Studio that they see no need to learn more about us ... or they’re too busy. And some prospective students may be so jaded by some other schools or the world in general that they assume we’re not quite what we claim to be. So here are some interesting things -- and some important things -- we’d like you to know....

Our Founder David Goldberg is himself a voice-over coach. In fact, he was our first. Did you know Edge Studio has been around for a quarter century? David founded Edge Studio for music recording, and over the years Edge Studio helped capture and shape the sound of many well-known groups and singers. But David also recorded spoken voice, soon being asked by clients to coach them in voice over performance. In 1991, he wrote the first edition of our Voice Over Guidebook, and David still coaches and directs voice-over performers today -- in our studio locations, over the phone, and via the Internet (using Skype, etc.). In addition, David is industry-recognized for providing practical guidance on special auditions and demos. To schedule a session with David call 888-321-3343 or email training@edgestudio.com. He works equally enthusiastically with beginners and established voice over pros.

Incidentally, although Edge Studio hasn’t produced a music album since the year 2000, we still produce music for all sorts of clients, including Disney/Pixar, Marvel Comics’ X-Men, and other films, videos, telephony systems, eLearning, and more.

Read the rest of Things you may not know about Edge Studio.. . .

May 28, 2013

by edgeadmin

Home studios allow you to record auditions and voice over jobs from home, in your pajamas, on your own time-clock, with as many takes (attempts) as you want, without anyone listening over your back. Sounds good.

But what if you are constantly on the go?

Many voice actors juggle more than one job, and a portable recording studio may be a better option. Like home studios, portable studios allow you to obtain work that you otherwise would not be able to obtain.

With certain equipment, some home studios can be portable enough to take with you -- allowing you take your studio with you on vacation (why loose a client if you can spend 15-minutes in your hotel room recording a quick job)?

An even simpler alternative would be a portable vocal booth. There are many quality vocal booths out there from the PortaBooth by Harlan Hogan to the mobile sound-proof sound booths offered by VocalBoothToGo.

They are completely mobile, easy to assemble and disassemble, tool-free, and can fit just about anywhere. Both are great for voice over recording and noise control.

This flexibility allows you to audition, work, and keep your clients, no matter where you are.

For more information on Harlan Hogan:
Visit their website at: http://www.harlanhogan.com/index.shtml
Email them at: harlan@harlanhogan.com
Call them at: 312-HARLAN-H (427-5264)

For more information on VocalBoothToGo:
Visit their website at: http://www.vocalboothtogo.com/
Email them at: support@vocalboothtogo.com
Call them at: 301-371-0775

. . .

April 17, 2013

by edgeadmin

Here at Edge Studio, we cast, record, and audition a LOT of voice actors. We are shocked at the number of voice actors who don’t follow instructions. As a result, many voice actors lose work from us and/or our clients.

In this series, we’ll highlight common mistakes made in our studio and give you friendly reminders to increase your voice over work.

PART II

Take Direction Well

It is essential to follow instructions that your client gives you. But many voice talent get too involved in their client's role ... sometimes to innocently provide constructive criticism, sometimes to show-off their writing/directing/engineering ability ... regardless this sometimes rubs clients the wrong way.

Rule of thumb: If you have any doubt as if you're going too far, then don't say it. Rather feel it out, make subtle hints, tell the office manager about your concern and let them address the client.

DOUBLE TIP: Do what you can to ensure that the client thinks that you think they are smart. The client will like you and is therefore more open to hiring you again.

Remember: when you are hired for a job, you imply that you’ll deliver what the client wants. Whether or not their direction makes sense is irrelevant. We have seen countless clients stop working with voice actors because the voice actor didn’t follow the client’s direction.

So suck it up, smile along, go for it... When someone is paying you, it's your job to do it their way. Just like hiring a painter: You hire the best painter, but still instruct them as to which walls to paint which colors. And they do so, whether or not it would be their first choice.

. . .

March 25, 2013

by edgeadmin

Here at Edge Studio, we cast, record, and audition a LOT of voice actors. We are shocked at the number of voice actors who don’t follow instructions. As a result, many voice actors lose work from us and/or our clients.

In this series, we highlight common mistakes made in our studio and give you friendly reminders to increase your voice over work.

PART III

--YOUR SLATE--

A slate is… your introduction to your audition, recording, etc. It could be as simple as your name, and as detailed as name, date, title of script, and more. It is imperative that you slate as you are told. If you are only asked for your name, do not add anything extra. Though you may think you are being cute or more interesting by adding things, ultimately you are not following instructions. This will immediately turn off the casting director. Also, if asked to slate your name, that does not mean you say, “Hi there, my name is Jane Smith.” It simply means you say, “Jane Smith,” pause and start reading the script.

Also… your name needs to represent you. While you are not reading the script yet, the slate is just as much part of the audition as the copy. If you say your name confidently and then continue with a great read, you are likely to get noticed “positively.” If you mutter your name under your breath, but still have a great read, the impression given by your slate will stay in the casting director’s mind, and you probably won’t get that job.

In conclusion… Your audition represents you as a whole, from the moment you open your mouth to “thank you” at the end. Make sure to follow directions all the way through. And remember that it is possible to slate the way you are asked, yet still convey a sense of you.

. . .

March 14, 2013

by edgeadmin

PART II

--Take Direction Well--

It is essential to follow instructions that your client gives you. But many voice talent get too involved in their client's role ... sometimes to innocently provide constructive criticism, sometimes to show-off their writing/directing/engineering ability ... regardless this sometimes rubs clients the wrong way.

Rule of thumb: If you have any doubt as if you're going too far, then don't say it. Rather feel it out, make subtle hints, tell the office manager about your concern and let them address the client.

DOUBLE TIP: Do what you can to ensure that the client thinks that you think they are smart. The client will like you and is therefore more open to hiring you again.

Remember: when you are hired for a job, you imply that you’ll deliver what the client wants. Whether or not their direction makes sense is irrelevant. We have seen countless clients stop working with voice actors because the voice actor didn’t follow the client’s direction.

So suck it up, smile along, go for it... When someone is paying you, it's your job to do it their way. Just like hiring a painter: You hire the best painter, but still instruct them as to which walls to paint which colors. And they do so, whether or not it would be their first choice.

. . .

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Call us 888-321-3343
Email us training@edgestudio.com

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